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Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
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Advanced practice nursing in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205152
Source
J Clin Nurs. 1998 May;7(3):257-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
M. Lorensen
D E Jones
G A Hamilton
Author Affiliation
Institute of Nursing Science, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Clin Nurs. 1998 May;7(3):257-64
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Models, Educational
Nurse Clinicians - education - organization & administration
Nurse Practitioners - education - organization & administration
Organizational Innovation
Scandinavia
Abstract
Changes in the delivery of health care and changes in population characteristics and health care requirements mandate changing requirements in nursing education. This is necessary to meet patient and family needs and to deliver quality health care. This paper describes the background to nursing education in the Nordic countries and gives an account of an initiative in Norway to prepare advanced practice nurses for clinical practice in this dynamic environment.
PubMed ID
9661389 View in PubMed
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Alberta: evaluation of nursing retention and recruitment programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126341
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:130-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Arlene Weidner
Carol Graham
Jennifer Smith
Julia Aitken
Jill Odell
Author Affiliation
Research to Action Project, Calgary, AB.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:130-47
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Burnout, Professional - nursing - prevention & control
Data Collection
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Mentors
Middle Aged
Nursing Evaluation Research - organization & administration
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection - statistics & numerical data
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Quality Improvement - organization & administration
Retirement
Retrospective Studies
Work Schedule Tolerance
Workplace
Abstract
Retention and recruitment strategies are essential to address nursing workforce supply and ensure the viability of healthcare delivery in Canada. Knowledge transfer between experienced nurses and those new to the profession is also a focus for concern. The Multi-Employer/United Nurses of Alberta Joint Committee attempted to address these issues by introducing a number of retention and recruitment (R&R) initiatives for nurses in Alberta: in total, seven different programs that were introduced to some 24,000 nurses and employers across the province of Alberta in 2001 (the Transitional Graduate Nurse Recruitment Program) and 2007 (the remaining six R&R programs). Approximately 1,600 nurses participated in the seven programs between 2001 and 2009. Of the seven strategies, one supported entry into the workplace, two were pre-retirement strategies and four involved flexible work options. This project entailed a retrospective evaluation of the seven programs and differed from the other Research to Action (RTA) projects because it was solely concerned with evaluation of pre-existing initiatives. All seven programs were launched without a formal evaluation component, and the tracking of local uptake varied throughout the province. The union and various employers faced challenges in implementing these strategies in a timely fashion, as most were designed at the bargaining table during negotiations. As a result, systems, policy and procedural changes had to be developed to support their implementation after they became available.Participants in the programs indicated improvements over time in several areas, including higher levels of satisfaction with work–life balance, hours worked and their current practice and profession. The evaluation found that participation led to perceived improvements in nurses' confidence, greater control over their work environment, decreased stress levels, increased energy and morale and perceived improved ability to provide high-quality care. However, no formal implementation plan had been developed or made available to assist employers with implementation of the programs. The findings highlight the need for more discipline in communicating, implementing and evaluating initiatives such as those evaluated retrospectively in this project. In particular, key performance indicators, baseline data, monitoring mechanisms and an evaluation plan need to be developed prior to implementation.
PubMed ID
22398489 View in PubMed
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An interdisciplinary rural health course: opportunities and challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188132
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2002 Jul;22(5):387-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
Frances E Racher
Author Affiliation
School of Health Studies, Brandon University, Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. racher@brandonu.ca
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2002 Jul;22(5):387-92
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Nursing - education
Counseling - education
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Education, Professional, Retraining - organization & administration
Humans
Manitoba
Needs Assessment
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Psychiatric Nursing - education
Rural Health
Social Work - education
Abstract
What is the potential of courses designed for nursing students to meet the learning priorities of other disciplines? Who could benefit? Nursing students at Brandon University interested in the 'community as client' concept requested a course that focused on the health of rural residents and the communities in which they live. Questions about (1) measuring the health of rural populations; (2) comparing health status, health resources and health care utilization of rural and urban populations; and (3) determining the health of rural communities emerged. As a result the course, 'Health of Rural Populations and Communities', was created. The Director of the Rural Development Institute examined the syllabus for the new course and asked that Rural Development students be allowed to enroll. This paper focuses on the challenges and opportunities for nursing education to address learning needs of other disciplines by sharing health and nursing knowledge. In doing so the learning of nursing students is also advanced. The development and delivery of a rural health course is used as a case study to illustrate the potential of this approach for nursing and interdisciplinary education.
PubMed ID
12383738 View in PubMed
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Barriers and supports for development of a clinician scientist role in cerebrovascular nursing: a position paper.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162580
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2007;20(2):69-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Theresa L Green
Joan Tranmer
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. greentl@ucalgary.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2007;20(2):69-79
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cerebrovascular Disorders - nursing
Cooperative Behavior
Diffusion of Innovation
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Evidence-Based Medicine - education - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Mentors
Nurse Clinicians - education - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Nursing Research - education - organization & administration
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Research Personnel - education - organization & administration
Social Support
Abstract
This position paper will: 1. Provide an update on relevant current developments in the education, training and positioning of clinician nurse scientists; 2. Provide and promote a rational argument for the development of the clinician nurse scientist role; and 3. Discuss issues related to capacity building in clinical research in neuroscience nursing, with specific reference to and support for the cerebrovascular (stroke) specialty nursing area.
PubMed ID
17619597 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular nursing in RN and higher education in Swedish universities: a national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70929
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Sep;3(3):255-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Bengt Fridlund
Jan Mårtensson
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Lund University, P.O. Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden. bengt.fridlund@omv.lu.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Sep;3(3):255-9
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiology - education
Cardiovascular Diseases - nursing
Comparative Study
Curriculum - standards - statistics & numerical data
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Diploma Programs - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing
Humans
Needs Assessment
Nurse Clinicians - education
Nursing Education Research
Questionnaires
Schools, Nursing
Specialties, Nursing - education
Sweden
Abstract
Cardiovascular nursing (CVN) is rapidly developing and has accumulated a large amount of evidence to support interventions aimed at reducing suffering and hastening recovery. However, knowledge of the extent and content of CVN training in Sweden is lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to identify and describe CVN in the Swedish RN education as well as in higher education, with reference to type of course and credits, content, area and target group. A nationwide survey was carried out in Sweden at all university level nursing schools (N=26) by means of a 25-item questionnaire, which was analysed by descriptive statistics. The findings show that 69% and 23% of the schools awarded 0-1 credits [0-1.5 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS)] and 2-3 credits (3-4.5 ECTS), respectively for cardiology/CVN in the RN education. Target areas outside the hospital setting reported by 23% and 19% of nursing schools were primary health care and community care, respectively. Special target groups in addition to the general public were the elderly (42%) and women (58%). Advanced courses in CVN comprising 10-40 credits (15-60 ECTS) were held by 27% of nursing schools, but no school had a specialist or Master level education. Important educational implications from the study of the RN education are the establishment of a minimum credit figure and to reach out into primary health care.
PubMed ID
15350236 View in PubMed
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The clinical option course in cancer nursing and palliative care at the University of Saskatchewan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202223
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 1999;9(1):48
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
M. Hills
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan.
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 1999;9(1):48
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Humans
Oncology Nursing - education
Palliative Care
Saskatchewan
Terminal Care
PubMed ID
10232145 View in PubMed
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Consortium approach for nurse practitioner education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196509
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2000 Oct;32(4):825-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
M H van Soeren
M A Andrusyszyn
H K Laschinger
D. Goldenberg
A. DiCenso
Author Affiliation
St Joseph's Health Centre, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2000 Oct;32(4):825-33
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Curriculum - standards
Education, Distance - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Focus Groups
Humans
Job Description
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nurse Practitioners - education - organization & administration - psychology
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Workload
Abstract
In 1995, a 10-university consortium approach to deliver a post-baccalaureate primary care nurse practitioner programme funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health was launched throughout Ontario, Canada. A combination of traditional and distance teaching methods, in English and French, were used. A 5-year research project was initiated to evaluate the entire programme, the effect of nurse practitioners on patient and health-care system outcomes and examine practice patterns. Participants included deans and directors (n = 10), regional co-ordinators (n = 5) and course developers, some of whom were also course professors (n = 8). This article is a report of the evaluation of the consortium programme after the first year from the perspective of groups involved in implementation and delivery. Results of qualitative analyses of participant perceptions from researcher-led focus groups and asynchronous electronic interviews provided the framework for the evaluation, and revealed the rationale for the consortium method, strengths, limitations and recommendations. Sharing ideas, resources and delivery and increased student access in remote areas were perceived as positive outcomes. Limitations included the short time period to develop programme content, identify and plan for distance education resources, and too little communication between universities and students. Researchers concluded that the consortium approach was effective for nurse practitioner education. Key factors identified for programme planning were communication, resources, curriculum and workload. Included among the recommendations was to allow sufficient time for role and course development before beginning a similar programme.
PubMed ID
11095220 View in PubMed
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42 records – page 1 of 5.