Skip header and navigation

Refine By

129 records – page 1 of 13.

Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
Less detail

Academic dishonesty in nursing schools: an empirical investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149336
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2009 Nov;48(11):614-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Donald L McCabe
Author Affiliation
Rutgers Business School, 111 Washington Street, Newark, NJ 07102, USA. dmccabe@andromeda.rutgers.edu
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2009 Nov;48(11):614-23
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Deception
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - ethics - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - ethics - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Plagiarism
Professional Misconduct - ethics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Schools, Nursing - ethics - organization & administration
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
Academic dishonesty, whether in the form of plagiarism or cheating on tests, has received renewed attention in the past few decades as pervasive use of the Internet and a presumed deterioration of ethics in the current generation of students has led some, perhaps many, to conclude that academic dishonesty is reaching epidemic proportions. What is lacking in many cases, including in the nursing profession, is empirical support of these trends. This article attempts to provide some of that empirical data and supports the conclusion that cheating is a significant issue in all disciplines today, including nursing. Some preliminary policy implications are also considered.
PubMed ID
19650608 View in PubMed
Less detail

Academic learning for specialist nurses: a grounded theory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266326
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2014 Nov;14(6):714-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Lena German Millberg
Linda Berg
Elisabeth Björk Brämberg
Gun Nordström
Joakim Ohlén
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2014 Nov;14(6):714-21
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Education, Nursing, Graduate
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Learning
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Educational
Nurse Clinicians - education
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim was to explore the major concerns of specialist nurses pertaining to academic learning during their education and initial professional career. Specialist nursing education changed in tandem with the European educational reform in 2007. At the same time, greater demands were made on the healthcare services to provide evidence-based and safe patient-care. These changes have influenced specialist nursing programmes and consequently the profession. Grounded Theory guided the study. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire with open-ended questions distributed at the end of specialist nursing programmes in 2009 and 2010. Five universities were included. Further, individual, pair and group interviews were used to collect data from 12 specialist nurses, 5-14 months after graduation. A major concern for specialist nurses was that academic learning should be "meaningful" for their professional future. The specialist nurses' "meaningful academic learning process" was characterised by an ambivalence of partly believing in and partly being hesitant about the significance of academic learning and partly receiving but also lacking support. Specialist nurses were influenced by factors in two areas: curriculum and healthcare context. They felt that the outcome of contribution to professional confidence was critical in making academic learning meaningful.
PubMed ID
25240945 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advanced community nursing practice: Athabasca University meets the challenge of primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210439
Source
AARN News Lett. 1996 Dec;52(11):12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
B A Getzlaf
Author Affiliation
Centre for Nursing and Health Studies, Athabasca University, Alberta.
Source
AARN News Lett. 1996 Dec;52(11):12
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Community Health Nursing - education
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Graduate
Humans
Nurse Practitioners - education
Primary Health Care
PubMed ID
9025340 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advanced practice nursing in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205152
Source
J Clin Nurs. 1998 May;7(3):257-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
M. Lorensen
D E Jones
G A Hamilton
Author Affiliation
Institute of Nursing Science, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Clin Nurs. 1998 May;7(3):257-64
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Models, Educational
Nurse Clinicians - education - organization & administration
Nurse Practitioners - education - organization & administration
Organizational Innovation
Scandinavia
Abstract
Changes in the delivery of health care and changes in population characteristics and health care requirements mandate changing requirements in nursing education. This is necessary to meet patient and family needs and to deliver quality health care. This paper describes the background to nursing education in the Nordic countries and gives an account of an initiative in Norway to prepare advanced practice nurses for clinical practice in this dynamic environment.
PubMed ID
9661389 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alberta: evaluation of nursing retention and recruitment programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126341
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:130-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Arlene Weidner
Carol Graham
Jennifer Smith
Julia Aitken
Jill Odell
Author Affiliation
Research to Action Project, Calgary, AB.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:130-47
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Burnout, Professional - nursing - prevention & control
Data Collection
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Mentors
Middle Aged
Nursing Evaluation Research - organization & administration
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection - statistics & numerical data
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Quality Improvement - organization & administration
Retirement
Retrospective Studies
Work Schedule Tolerance
Workplace
Abstract
Retention and recruitment strategies are essential to address nursing workforce supply and ensure the viability of healthcare delivery in Canada. Knowledge transfer between experienced nurses and those new to the profession is also a focus for concern. The Multi-Employer/United Nurses of Alberta Joint Committee attempted to address these issues by introducing a number of retention and recruitment (R&R) initiatives for nurses in Alberta: in total, seven different programs that were introduced to some 24,000 nurses and employers across the province of Alberta in 2001 (the Transitional Graduate Nurse Recruitment Program) and 2007 (the remaining six R&R programs). Approximately 1,600 nurses participated in the seven programs between 2001 and 2009. Of the seven strategies, one supported entry into the workplace, two were pre-retirement strategies and four involved flexible work options. This project entailed a retrospective evaluation of the seven programs and differed from the other Research to Action (RTA) projects because it was solely concerned with evaluation of pre-existing initiatives. All seven programs were launched without a formal evaluation component, and the tracking of local uptake varied throughout the province. The union and various employers faced challenges in implementing these strategies in a timely fashion, as most were designed at the bargaining table during negotiations. As a result, systems, policy and procedural changes had to be developed to support their implementation after they became available.Participants in the programs indicated improvements over time in several areas, including higher levels of satisfaction with work–life balance, hours worked and their current practice and profession. The evaluation found that participation led to perceived improvements in nurses' confidence, greater control over their work environment, decreased stress levels, increased energy and morale and perceived improved ability to provide high-quality care. However, no formal implementation plan had been developed or made available to assist employers with implementation of the programs. The findings highlight the need for more discipline in communicating, implementing and evaluating initiatives such as those evaluated retrospectively in this project. In particular, key performance indicators, baseline data, monitoring mechanisms and an evaluation plan need to be developed prior to implementation.
PubMed ID
22398489 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of doctoral theses in nursing science produced in Finland in the years 1982-1987].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103383
Source
Hoitotiede. 1990;2(2):158-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A M Pietilä
Source
Hoitotiede. 1990;2(2):158-64
Date
1990
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Collection
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Dissertations, Academic as Topic
Education, Nursing, Graduate
Finland
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Nursing Theory
Research Design
Abstract
Licentiate theses in nursing science produced in Finland in 1982-87 are analysed in terms of their frame of reference, methodology, data collection techniques and analytical methods. The data were gathered by means of a content analysis using a list of themes specially constructed for this purpose and classified qualitatively on the basis of statements appearing in the theses. The majority of the theses were of a descriptive nature, usually employing a survey method. The most common means of data collection was by questionnaire, typically combining a number of such methods within the same work. The material was largely analysed by quantitative methods, with a qualitative approach adopted in only two cases. The theoretical frame of reference consisted of the theories of nursing science and the behavioural sciences, but two theses were found which did not make use of information from nursing science at all in their frame of reference, and three which developed their own theoretical models.
PubMed ID
2361058 View in PubMed
Less detail

An interdisciplinary rural health course: opportunities and challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188132
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2002 Jul;22(5):387-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
Frances E Racher
Author Affiliation
School of Health Studies, Brandon University, Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. racher@brandonu.ca
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2002 Jul;22(5):387-92
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Nursing - education
Counseling - education
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Education, Professional, Retraining - organization & administration
Humans
Manitoba
Needs Assessment
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Psychiatric Nursing - education
Rural Health
Social Work - education
Abstract
What is the potential of courses designed for nursing students to meet the learning priorities of other disciplines? Who could benefit? Nursing students at Brandon University interested in the 'community as client' concept requested a course that focused on the health of rural residents and the communities in which they live. Questions about (1) measuring the health of rural populations; (2) comparing health status, health resources and health care utilization of rural and urban populations; and (3) determining the health of rural communities emerged. As a result the course, 'Health of Rural Populations and Communities', was created. The Director of the Rural Development Institute examined the syllabus for the new course and asked that Rural Development students be allowed to enroll. This paper focuses on the challenges and opportunities for nursing education to address learning needs of other disciplines by sharing health and nursing knowledge. In doing so the learning of nursing students is also advanced. The development and delivery of a rural health course is used as a case study to illustrate the potential of this approach for nursing and interdisciplinary education.
PubMed ID
12383738 View in PubMed
Less detail

129 records – page 1 of 13.