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10 years of perioperative nursing certification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170776
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 2005 Dec;23(4):18-9, 24-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005

Advanced cardiac life support: a survey of interprofessional attitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233123
Source
Heart Lung. 1988 May;17(3):254-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1988
Author
R W Swanson
V R Ramsden
Author Affiliation
Advanced Cardiac Life Support Sub-Committee, Canadian Heart Foundation, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.
Source
Heart Lung. 1988 May;17(3):254-5
Date
May-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Education, Medical, Continuing - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Life Support Care - education
Questionnaires
Resuscitation - education
Saskatchewan
Abstract
A questionnaire survey was conducted of physicians and nurses who had participated in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS)-Provider courses during a 5-year period. Both physicians and nurses believed that a conjoint physician-nurse ACLS-Provider course was a good learning experience and an excellent exercise in interprofessional communication. On the basis of these data, we suggest that a conjoint ACLS-Provider course be maintained, rather than establishing different modules for different professions.
PubMed ID
3366594 View in PubMed
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An educational intervention for district nurses: use of electronic records in leg ulcer management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78585
Source
J Wound Care. 2007 Jan;16(1):29-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Lagerin A.
Nilsson G.
Törnkvist L.
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Centre for Family and Community Medicine (CeFAM), Huddinge, Sweden. Annica.Lagerin@sll.se
Source
J Wound Care. 2007 Jan;16(1):29-32
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Clinical Competence - standards
Data Collection - methods
Documentation
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Leg Ulcer - nursing - ultrasonography
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - utilization
Middle Aged
Nursing Assessment - methods
Nursing Audit - methods
Nursing Education Research - methods
Nursing Evaluation Research - methods
Nursing Records
Program Evaluation
Public Health Nursing - education - organization & administration
Skin Care - nursing
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate district nurses' management of leg ulcer patients and the effects of an in-service education programme led by district nurses as local educators at primary health-care centres. METHOD: Data were collected from electronic patient records (EPRs), both before and after the educational intervention. Nineteen district nurses undertook a one-day course focusing on four themes: Doppler assessment and measurement of ankle brachial pressure index; compression treatment; patient education; nursing documentation. Fourteen acted as in-service educators; 12 educators completed the intervention.The EPRs were scrutinised with an audit tool. RESULTS: The documentation on the selected key areas for the management of patients with leg ulcers was generally sparse, although the educational intervention resulted in statistically significant effects on documentation in three areas. CONCLUSION: Further improvements in care are necessary, as are qualitative and quantitative studies to explore the large discrepancies between guidelines and everyday clinical practice in this field.
PubMed ID
17334143 View in PubMed
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An educational program to transition oncology nurses at the Norwegian Radium Hospital to an evidence-based practice model: development, implementation, and preliminary outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259743
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2014 Jun;29(2):224-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Marie Bruheim
Kendra V Woods
Sigbjørn Smeland
Monica W Nortvedt
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2014 Jun;29(2):224-32
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Evidence-Based Practice - education - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Plan Implementation
Humans
Medical Oncology - education
Models, Educational
Norway
Nursing Faculty Practice - organization & administration
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration - psychology
Patient-Centered Care
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Increasingly, nurses are expected to systematically improve their practice according to principles of evidence-based practice (EBP). In 2009, the Norwegian Radium Hospital, inspired by the EBP nursing model at its sister institution, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, began transitioning its oncology nurses to an EBP model. Norwegian Radium Hospital nursing leaders selected an EBP expert to design an EBP educational program. The program consisted of a 1-semester, 15-credit-hour postgraduate EBP course followed by a clinical practicum during which selected nurses worked in groups to apply principles of EBP to challenging clinical questions. As of this writing, 60 staff nurses have completed the program. Nurses participating in the EBP program have developed 13 evidence-based clinical guidelines, evidence-based clinical procedures, and patient information documents, 9 of which have been adopted as national standards. Participants have demonstrated increased confidence in providing the best available patient care, deeper reflection about their practice, and a sense of being valued by their nurse and physician colleagues. At the institutional level, the EBP project has resulted in higher confidence that patients are receiving patient-centered care based on the best scientific evidence. The project has also resulted in increased collaboration between nurses and other practitioners within multidisciplinary clinical problem-solving teams. This successful EBP program could serve as a model for other cancer hospitals desiring to move to an EBP patient-care model, not only for nursing practice but also, more broadly, for delivery of cancer care by diverse multidisciplinary teams.
PubMed ID
24197689 View in PubMed
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An experience with an online learning environment to support a change in practice in an emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177618
Source
Comput Inform Nurs. 2004 Mar-Apr;22(2):107-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
Janet Curran-Smith
Shauna Best
Author Affiliation
IWK Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. janet.curransmith@iwk.nshealth.ca
Source
Comput Inform Nurs. 2004 Mar-Apr;22(2):107-10
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods - standards
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Emergency Nursing - education - organization & administration
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Humans
Internet - organization & administration
Nova Scotia
Nurse's Role
Nursing Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Online Systems - organization & administration
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Program Evaluation
Social Support
Triage - organization & administration
Abstract
Providing continuing education to support a change in practice for a busy Emergency Department poses a challenge. Factors such as shift work, high patient acuity, and unpredictable patient flow create barriers to traditional methods of delivery of a comprehensive educational experience. This article describes an experience with introducing a change in practice using an innovative Web-based delivery plan. Specific strategies were employed to address presentation of content, application of knowledge, establishment of a shared understanding, and enhancement of communication opportunities. The Web-based learning environment proved to be a successful means of providing nurses with a collaborative learning experience around a new practice issue. This experience also highlighted the need for a new skill set for learners and educators using online learning technologies.
PubMed ID
15520575 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of nursing staff towards nutritional nursing care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61604
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Sep;17(3):223-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Lennart Christensson
Mitra Unosson
Margareta Bachrach-Lindström
Anna-Christina Ek
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing Science, Department of Medicine and Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. lennart.christensson@educ.ltjkpg.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Sep;17(3):223-31
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Dementia - complications - nursing
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Homes
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Nutrition - education
Nutrition Disorders - etiology - nursing
Nutritional Support - nursing
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Efficacy
Sweden
Abstract
Fulfilling nutritional requirements in residents with eating problems can be a challenge for both the person in need of help and for the caregiver. In helping and supporting these residents, a positive attitude is assumed to be as important as practical skill. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that nutritional education and implementation of a nutritional programme would change the attitudes towards nutritional nursing care among nursing staff with daily experience of serving food and helping residents in municipal care. The study was carried out as a before and after experimental design. An attitude scale, staff attitudes to nutritional nursing care (SANN scale), was developed and used. The response on the scale gives a total SANN-score and scores in five underlying dimensions: self ability, individualization, importance of food, assessment and secured food intake. Nursing staff at eight different residential units (n = 176) responded to the attitude scale and, of these, staff at three of the units entered the study as the experimental group. After responding to the attitude scale, nutritional education was introduced and a nutritional programme was implemented in the experimental units. One year later, attitudes were measured a second time (n = 192). Of these, 151 had also responded on the first occasion. Education and implementation of a nutritional programme did not significantly change attitudes. Overall, nursing staff responded with positive attitudes towards nutritional nursing care. Most of the positive attitudes concerned items within the dimension importance of food. In contrast, items within self ability showed the lowest number of staff with positive attitudes.
PubMed ID
12919456 View in PubMed
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143 records – page 1 of 15.