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The 15-Minute Family Interview as a learning strategy for senior undergraduate nursing students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117158
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2013 May;19(2):230-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Lorraine Holtslander
Jessica Solar
Nicole R Smith
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. lorraine.holtslander@usask.ca
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2013 May;19(2):230-48
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - methods
Family Nursing - education - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Models, Nursing
Students, Nursing
Abstract
Nursing care of families continues to be a challenge within complex and demanding health-care systems. Educational strategies to bridge the theory-practice gap, connecting classroom learning with clinical experiences in undergraduate nursing education, enable students to develop the skills required to form meaningful partnerships with families. This article describes how undergraduate nursing students complete a 15-Minute Family Interview in a clinical practice setting, and document the interview process in a reflective major paper. Students integrate research and theory and identify ways to improve the care of families in the clinical setting while building communication skills and confidence in interacting with families in everyday practice. The implementation of the assignment and the evaluation of the process, including quotes from 10 student papers and 2 clinical faculty members, are discussed. Implications for education and ongoing research are offered.
PubMed ID
23329627 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
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Academic dishonesty in nursing schools: an empirical investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149336
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2009 Nov;48(11):614-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Donald L McCabe
Author Affiliation
Rutgers Business School, 111 Washington Street, Newark, NJ 07102, USA. dmccabe@andromeda.rutgers.edu
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2009 Nov;48(11):614-23
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Deception
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - ethics - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - ethics - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Plagiarism
Professional Misconduct - ethics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Schools, Nursing - ethics - organization & administration
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
Academic dishonesty, whether in the form of plagiarism or cheating on tests, has received renewed attention in the past few decades as pervasive use of the Internet and a presumed deterioration of ethics in the current generation of students has led some, perhaps many, to conclude that academic dishonesty is reaching epidemic proportions. What is lacking in many cases, including in the nursing profession, is empirical support of these trends. This article attempts to provide some of that empirical data and supports the conclusion that cheating is a significant issue in all disciplines today, including nursing. Some preliminary policy implications are also considered.
PubMed ID
19650608 View in PubMed
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Addressing the spiritual dimension in Canadian undergraduate nursing education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182952
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2003 Sep;35(3):94-107
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Joanne K Olson
Pauline Paul
Lillian Douglass
Margaret B Clark
Jane Simington
Nancy Goddard
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, 3rd Floor, Clinical Sciences Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G3, Canada. Joanne.olson@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2003 Sep;35(3):94-107
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Curriculum
Data Collection
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Holistic Nursing - education
Humans
Religion and Medicine
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to identify the extent to which the spiritual dimension is addressed in Canadian university undergraduate nursing curricula. An exploratory descriptive design was used to gather data from faculty members at Canadian university schools of nursing. Eighteen (62%) of the 29 eligible schools participated. The findings indicate that conceptual confusion exists and that the spiritual dimension is rarely defined or included in curricular objectives. However, they also indicate that the spiritual dimension is more frequently evident in course objectives and that a number of creative methods are used to address it. Testing in this area is sporadic and limited. The results indicate that greater attention could be given to this dimension.
PubMed ID
14603573 View in PubMed
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Adjusting to future demands in healthcare: Curriculum changes and nursing students' self-reported professional competence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280083
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2016 Feb;37:178-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Kersti Theander
Bodil Wilde-Larsson
Marianne Carlsson
Jan Florin
Ann Gardulf
Eva Johansson
Christina Lindholm
Gun Nordström
Jan Nilsson
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2016 Feb;37:178-83
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Self Report
Students, Nursing
Sweden
Abstract
Nursing competence is of significant importance for patient care. Newly graduated nursing students rate their competence as high. However, the impact of different designs of nursing curricula on nursing students' self-reported nursing competence areas is seldom reported.
To compare newly graduated nursing students' self-reported professional competence before and after the implementation of a new nursing curriculum. The study had a descriptive comparative design. Nursing students, who graduated in 2011, having studied according to an older curriculum, were compared with those who graduated in 2014, after a new nursing curriculum with more focus on person-centered nursing had been implemented.
A higher education nursing program at a Swedish university.
In total, 119 (2011 n=69, 2014 n=50) nursing students responded.
Nursing students' self-reported professional competencies were assessed with the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) scale.
There were no significant differences between the two groups of nursing students, who graduated in 2011 and 2014, respectively, with regard to age, sex, education, or work experience. Both groups rated their competencies as very high. Competence in value-based nursing was perceived to be significantly higher after the change in curriculum. The lowest competence, both in 2011 and 2014, was reported in education and supervision of staff and students.
Our findings indicate that newly graduated nursing students - both those following the old curriculum and the first batch of students following the new one - perceive that their professional competence is high. Competence in value-based nursing, measured with the NPC scale, was reported higher after the implementation of a new curriculum, reflecting curriculum changes with more focus on person-centered nursing.
PubMed ID
26703792 View in PubMed
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Advanced practice nursing in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205152
Source
J Clin Nurs. 1998 May;7(3):257-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
M. Lorensen
D E Jones
G A Hamilton
Author Affiliation
Institute of Nursing Science, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Clin Nurs. 1998 May;7(3):257-64
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Models, Educational
Nurse Clinicians - education - organization & administration
Nurse Practitioners - education - organization & administration
Organizational Innovation
Scandinavia
Abstract
Changes in the delivery of health care and changes in population characteristics and health care requirements mandate changing requirements in nursing education. This is necessary to meet patient and family needs and to deliver quality health care. This paper describes the background to nursing education in the Nordic countries and gives an account of an initiative in Norway to prepare advanced practice nurses for clinical practice in this dynamic environment.
PubMed ID
9661389 View in PubMed
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Affective learning in end-of-life care education: the experience of nurse educators and students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153526
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2008 Dec;14(12):610-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Louise-Andrée Brien
Alain Legault
Nicole Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, Université de Montréal, Quebéc, Canada. louise-andree.brien@umontreal.ca
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2008 Dec;14(12):610-4
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affect
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Competency-Based Education - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Learning
Models, Educational
Models, Nursing
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Problem-Based Learning - organization & administration
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Questionnaires
Students, Nursing - psychology
Terminal Care - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
Preparing future nurses to care for dying patients and their families represents a challenge for nursing education. Affective learning, essential to nurture a caring perspective in end-of-life care, can elicit strong emotional reactions in students, to which nurse educators must remain keenly sensitive. This article presents the experience of nurse educators and students with experiential and reflective activities addressing the affective domain of learning, within an intensive 4-week undergraduate course on end-of-life care, developed with a competency-based approach. It stressed the importance of strategic teaching for developing interpersonal competencies in end-of-life care, but revealed difficulties for both nurse educators and students in assessing outcomes derived from affective learning.
PubMed ID
19104478 View in PubMed
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Aims and theoretical frameworks in nursing students' Bachelor's theses in Sweden: A descriptive study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280081
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2016 Feb;37:91-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Marit Silén
Linda Johansson
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2016 Feb;37:91-6
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dissertations, Academic as Topic
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Humans
Models, Nursing
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Theory
Students, Nursing
Sweden
Abstract
Nursing students' independent projects in Sweden not only provide an opportunity to receive a professional qualification as a nurse but also gain a Bachelor's degree in nursing. The aim of these projects is to demonstrate knowledge and understanding within the major field of the education.
This study aimed to describe and analyze the topics as well as theoretical frameworks and concepts in nursing students' independent projects, which lead to a Bachelor's degree, in a Swedish context.
A total of 491 independent projects, written by nursing students in Sweden, were included in the study.
Topics together with theoretical frameworks and concepts in the projects were identified. Similar topics and theoretical frameworks and concepts, respectively, were grouped into subcategories, and similar subcategories were then merged into a main category. The number of entries in each category was counted for descriptive statistics in order to allow for the demonstration of magnitude.
The most common topics concerned experiences and managing when having an illness, experiences of care and of being a caregiver, and healthcare staff's care and knowledge. The nursing theories/models that were most often used were Eriksson's Theory of Caritative Caring, Travelbee's Human-to-Human Relationship Model, and Orem's Self-care Theory. Among the non-nursing theories/models, perspectives and concepts lifeworld, ethical values and principles, existential concepts and quality of life/health-related quality of life, were most often used by these students.
There may be some difficulty in finding a topic for the project that is relevant for both a professional qualification as a nurse, as well as for achieving the requirements of a Bachelor's degree in nursing. The study indicates that there is a need to widen the student's understanding of different nursing theories/perspectives/models/concepts during nursing education so that students are familiar with a broad range of these when conducting their independent project.
PubMed ID
26718541 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Alta RN. 2001 May-Jun;57(3):3-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Richardson
Author Affiliation
slrichar@telusplanet.net
Source
Alta RN. 2001 May-Jun;57(3):3-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Demography
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - statistics & numerical data - trends
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In 2000 more than one-quarter of the Alberta RN labour force was older than 50 years of age, while close to one-half was between 36 and 50 years of age. While this age distribution denotes a mature RN cadre, with considerable valuable practice experience, it also signals a need for an increased number of new RN graduates to replace those soon to be retiring. Although possibly age-related, the proportion of Alberta RNs working regular full-time is less than half--only 45 per cent. Concomitantly, more than half of all Alberta RNs are employed casually and part-time. Especially in a time of RN shortage, reasons for such limited full-time employment warrant examination. As in the past, three-quarters of Alberta RNs work in institutional settings--hospitals and nursing homes--while only eight per cent work in community health. The shift to health promotion and disease prevention has yet to happen in Alberta. In 2000, almost 80 per cent of all Alberta RNs were employed in direct care giving, and less than 10 per cent were employed in management, administration and education. In 2000, almost two-thirds of all Alberta RNs held a diploma in nursing. Of the slightly more than 8,000 Alberta RNs with a baccalaureate degree, the overwhelming majority--85 per cent--worked in direct patient care, and only 13 per cent were employed in administration and teaching. Increasingly, we can expect to see more RNs with baccalaureate degrees at the bedside, in part because of the recent significant shift toward new graduates entering practice with a degree. Since 1997, the number of new RNs entering practice with a degree has been four times greater than the number entering with a diploma. Increased government funding of degree nursing programs aimed at alleviating the current nursing shortage means this trend will continue.
PubMed ID
11899449 View in PubMed
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477 records – page 1 of 48.