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Advancing health care education and practice through research: the University of Toronto, Donald R. Wilson Centre for Research in Education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178281
Source
Acad Med. 2004 Oct;79(10):1003-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Brian Hodges
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine, Donald R. Wilson Centre for Research in Education, University Health Network, 200 Elizabeth Street, 1 Eaton South 565, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4 Canada. brian.hodges@utoronto.ca
Source
Acad Med. 2004 Oct;79(10):1003-6
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Medical - trends
Health Occupations
Humans
Leadership
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Organizational Objectives
Research - organization & administration
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Abstract
The vision of the Wilson Centre for Research in Education at the University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, is "advancing health care education and practice through research." With a core staff of eight PhD researchers, five full-time administrative staff, 150 clinical faculty members, and over a dozen fellows and visiting professors from around the world, the Wilson Centre has become an international leader in health professional education research. Diversity of ideas and research methodologies, a culture of mutual support and mentorship, and strong support from both the university and a major teaching hospital have propelled the Wilson Centre. Challenges such as focusing research priorities, involving the clinical faculty more extensively, and defining productive international collaborations are among the current issues for academic planning.
PubMed ID
15383365 View in PubMed
Less detail

An international survey of death education trends in faculties of nursing and medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209306
Source
Death Stud. 1997 Mar-Apr;21(2):177-88
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Downe-Wamboldt
D. Tamlyn
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Death Stud. 1997 Mar-Apr;21(2):177-88
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Curriculum
Death
Education, Medical - trends
Education, Nursing - trends
Ethics, Medical
Great Britain
Humans
Questionnaires
Social Work - education - trends
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the availability of death education, including teaching and evaluation methods, specific content areas, issues being addressed, and the background and expertise of the faculty members involved in teaching death and dying content. A questionnaire was developed based on the current literature and sent to 80 faculties of nursing and 36 faculties of medicine in Canada and the United Kingdom. The majority of nursing and medical schools that responded to the survey included death education, an integrated approach, through all years of their programs. Despite recent criticisms of Kubler-Ross's model of grieving, the majority of programs reported using her theory most frequently. The findings identify the current status of death education for health professionals in Canada and the United Kingdom, and implications for curriculum changes are discussed.
PubMed ID
10169690 View in PubMed
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Better doctor efficiency is the real key to better productivity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148442
Source
Med Educ. 2009 Oct;43(10):1019
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Farah Manji
Iva Vukin
Barbara Lent
Carol Herbert
Source
Med Educ. 2009 Oct;43(10):1019
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical - trends
Efficiency
Female
Humans
Male
Physician's Practice Patterns
Physicians, Women - trends
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Notes
Comment In: Med Educ. 2010 Apr;44(4):42920444078
Comment On: Med Educ. 2009 May;43(5):442-819422491
PubMed ID
19769652 View in PubMed
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The changing paradigm of contemporary U.S. allopathic medical school graduates' career paths: analysis of the 1997-2004 national AAMC Graduation Questionnaire database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83566
Source
Acad Med. 2007 Sep;82(9):888-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Jeffe Donna B
Andriole Dorothy A
Hageman Heather L
Whelan Alison J
Author Affiliation
Washington University School of Medicine, and director, Health Behavior, St. Louis, Missouri 63108, USA. djeffe@im.wustl.edu
Source
Acad Med. 2007 Sep;82(9):888-94
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Career Choice
Career Mobility
Data Collection
Databases
Demography
Education, Medical - trends
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Primary Health Care - manpower - statistics & numerical data - trends
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical - trends
Specialties, Medical - education - manpower - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
PURPOSE: During the last 15 years, the proportion of U.S. allopathic medical graduates planning to pursue alternative careers (other than full-time clinical practice) has been increasing. The authors sought to identify factors associated with contemporary medical graduates' career-setting plans. METHOD: The authors obtained anonymous data from the 108,408 U.S. allopathic medical graduates who completed the 1997-2004 national Association of American Medical Colleges Graduation Questionnaire (GQ). Using multinomial logistic regression, responses to eight GQ items regarding graduates' demographics, medical school characteristics, and specialty choice were tested in association with three career-setting plans (full-time university faculty; other, including government agencies, non-university-based research, or medical or health care administration; or undecided) compared with full-time (nonacademic) clinical practice. RESULTS: The sample included 94,101 (86.8% of 108,408) GQ respondents with complete data. From 1997 to 2004, the proportions of graduates planning full-time clinical practice careers decreased from 51.3% to 46.5%; the proportions selecting primary care and obstetrics-gynecology specialties also decreased. Graduates reporting Hispanic race/ethnicity or no response to race/ethnicity, lower debt, dual advanced degrees at graduation, and psychiatric-specialty choice were consistently more likely to plan to pursue alternative careers. Graduates selecting an obstetrics-gynecology specialty/ subspecialty were consistently less likely to plan to pursue alternative careers. Being female, Asian/Pacific Islander, Black or Native American/Alaskan, and selecting non-primary-care specialties were variably associated with alternative career plans. CONCLUSIONS: As the medical student population becomes more demographically diverse, as graduates increasingly select non-primary-care specialties, and as dual-degree-program graduates and alternative career opportunities for physicians expand, the proportion of U.S. graduates planning full-time clinical practice careers likely will continue to decline.
PubMed ID
17726402 View in PubMed
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Current political issues facing emergency medicine in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179409
Source
Emerg Med Australas. 2004 Jun;16(3):190-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Brian R Holroyd
Brian H Rowe
Douglas Sinclair
Author Affiliation
Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. bholroyd@ualberta.ca
Source
Emerg Med Australas. 2004 Jun;16(3):190-4
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Certification - organization & administration
Education, Medical - trends
Emergency Medicine - economics - education - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Financing, Government - trends
Humans
Physician's Role
Politics
Abstract
Health care in Canada is universal, accessible, transferable and publicly funded. Each of Canada's provinces has the responsibility for health care funding and delivery through its ministry of health, controlled by the governing provincial party and overseen by a Minister of Health. The Federal Government is responsible for ensuring the provinces conform to the spirit and regulations within the Canada Health Act and for broad programme funding, through the federal Minister of Health. As such, access to emergency health services is available to all Canadians free of direct charge. Some aspects of health care are the direct responsibility of citizens, such as ambulance services, medications (for those who can afford them), and 'non-essential' services. For most Canadians, however, care for acute illness and injury is provided without barriers in EDs while generalists such as family physicians and paediatricians provide primary care.
Notes
Comment In: Emerg Med Australas. 2004 Oct-Dec;16(5-6):387-9315537399
PubMed ID
15228460 View in PubMed
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[Education of medical students in substance abuse]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12204
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Mar 20;110(8):970-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-1990
Author
J M Kvamme
S. Fauske
Author Affiliation
Institutt for allmennmedisin, Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Mar 20;110(8):970-2
Date
Mar-20-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism
Curriculum
Education, Medical - trends
English Abstract
Humans
Norway
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
A substantial amount of resources available to the health services in Norway are spent on alcohol- and drug-related disorders. Physicians play an important role in preventing, diagnosing and treating these disorders. We have reviewed the curricula used at our four Norwegian medical schools for education in this field. The curricula are characterized by lack of specified educational goals and are somewhat limited, seen in relation to the extent of the alcohol- and drug-related problems. With reference to a structured educational programme at Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm, we propose a new Norwegian model for alcohol- and drug related medical education. This model focuses especially on early identification of problems and intervention in harmful alcohol consumption.
PubMed ID
2321229 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Education, working environment and future employment prospects of Icelandic surgeons].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139976
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Oct;96(10):603-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Tómas Gudbjartsson
Halla Vidarsdóttir
Sveinn Magnússon
Author Affiliation
tomasgud@landspitali.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Oct;96(10):603-9
Date
Oct-2010
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Career Choice
Education, Medical - trends
Employment - trends
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Iceland
Licensure, Medical
Male
Middle Aged
Residence Characteristics
Retirement
Schools, Medical
Specialties, Surgical - education - manpower - trends
Universities
Workplace
Abstract
Information about the education, training and future employment prospects of Icelandic surgeons has not been available.
The study included all Icelandic surgeons, in all subspecialties, educated at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Iceland. Information on specialty training, higher academic degrees and in which country these were obtained was collected. Future employment prospects were analysed by calculating supply and demand until the year 2025. Approximations, such as sustained demand for surgeons per capita, were used.
Out of 237 licensed surgeons, two thirds were living in Iceland and 36 were retired. Majority (69.2%) had been trained in Sweden and orthopaedic (26.9%) and general surgery (23.9%) were the most common subspecialties. The average age of surgeons in Iceland was 52 years and 44 years for surgeons abroad. Females were 8% of surgeons in Iceland while being 17.4% among 36 doctors in surgical training overseas. Over 19% had received a PhD degree. Predictions suggest that supply and demand for surgeons in Iceland will be equal in the year 2025, not taking into account the prospects for the working market outside Iceland.
A third of Icelandic surgeons live outside Iceland. The proportion of female surgeons is low but it is increasing. Our predictions indicate a balanced work market for surgeons in Iceland for the next 15 years. However, there are many uncertainty factors in the calculations and they do not predict the prospects for individual subspecialties.
Notes
Comment In: Laeknabladid. 2010 Oct;96(10):59920959676
PubMed ID
20959678 View in PubMed
Less detail

Emergency medicine practice and training in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185020
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Jun 10;168(12):1549-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-10-2003
Author
Ivan P Steiner
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine and Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta. ivan.steiner@ualberta.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Jun 10;168(12):1549-50
Date
Jun-10-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical - trends
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - trends
Emergency Medicine - education - manpower
Family Practice - education
Humans
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2002 Oct 15;167(8):869-7012406944
Cites: J Emerg Med. 1994 Jul-Aug;12(4):559-657963406
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2002 May;39(5):510-2711973558
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2002 Jul;40(1):3-1512085066
Cites: Acad Emerg Med. 2003 Jul;10(7):731-712837647
Comment In: CMAJ. 2003 Sep 2;169(5):389; author reply 391-212952792
Comment In: CMAJ. 2003 Sep 2;169(5):389-91; author reply 391-212952793
PubMed ID
12796335 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2003 Nov;49:1440-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Oct;96(10):599
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
María Heimisdóttir
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Oct;96(10):599
Date
Oct-2010
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Career Choice
Education, Medical - trends
Employment
Forecasting
Humans
Iceland
Licensure, Medical
Residence Characteristics
Specialties, Surgical - manpower - trends
Time Factors
Workplace
Notes
Comment On: Laeknabladid. 2010 Oct;96(10):603-920959678
PubMed ID
20959676 View in PubMed
Less detail

32 records – page 1 of 4.