Skip header and navigation

Refine By

66 records – page 1 of 7.

The academic half-day in Canadian neurology residency programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177008
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2004 Nov;31(4):511-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Colin Chalk
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Centre for Medical Education, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2004 Nov;31(4):511-3
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel
Adult
Canada
Education, Medical - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internship and Residency - organization & administration
Neurology - education
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Teaching - methods
Abstract
The academic half-day (AHD) appears to have become widespread in Canadian neurology residency programs, but there is little published information about the structure, content, or impact of the AHD.
A written questionnaire was sent to the directors of all active Canadian adult and child neurology residency programs.
All 21 program directors responded. An AHD was operating in 15/15 adult and 5/6 child neurology programs. The AHD typically lasts three hours, and occurs weekly, 10 months per year. Most of the weekly sessions are lectures or seminars, usually led by clinicians, with about 90% resident attendance. Course-like features (required textbook, examinations) are present in many AHDs. There is a wide range of topics, from disease pathophysiology to practice management, with considerable variation between programs.
Almost all Canadian neurology programs now have an AHD. Academic half-days are broadly similar in content and format across the country, and residents now spend a substantial portion of their training attending the AHD. The impact of the AHD on how residency programs are organized, and on the learning, clinical work, and professional development of residents merits further study.
PubMed ID
15595258 View in PubMed
Less detail

AIDER: a model for social accountability in medical education and practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115994
Source
Med Teach. 2013 Aug;35(8):e1403-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Gurjit Sandhu
Ivneet Garcha
Jessica Sleeth
Karen Yeates
G Ross Walker
Author Affiliation
Postgraduate Medical Education, Faculty of Health Sciences, 70 Barrie Street, Queen’s University, Kingston,ON K7L 3N6, Canada. sandhug@queensu.ca
Source
Med Teach. 2013 Aug;35(8):e1403-8
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Canada
Disabled Persons
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Physicians
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Sex
Sexism
Social Justice
Socioeconomic Factors
Total Quality Management
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Social accountability in healthcare requires physicians and medical institutions to direct their research, services and education activities to adequately address health inequities. The need for greater social accountability has been addressed in numerous national and international healthcare reviews of health disparities and medical education.
The aim of this work is to better understand how to identify underserved populations and address their specific needs and also to provide physicians and medical institutions with a means by which to cultivate social accountability.
The authors reviewed existing literature and prominent models focusing on social accountability, as well as medical education frameworks, and identified the need to engage underserved stakeholders and incorporate education that includes knowledge translation and reciprocity. The AIDER model was developed to satisfy the need in medical education and practice that is not explicitly addressed in previous models.
The AIDER model (Assess, Inquire, Deliver, Educate, Respond) is a continuous monitoring process that explicitly incorporates reciprocal education and continuous collaboration with underserved stakeholders.
This model is an incremental step forward in helping physicians and medical institutions foster a culture of social accountability both in individual practice and throughout the continuum of medical education.
PubMed ID
23444886 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alberta's Rural Physician Action Plan: an integrated approach to education, recruitment and retention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206424
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Feb 10;158(3):351-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1998
Author
D R Wilson
S C Woodhead-Lyons
D G Moores
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Feb 10;158(3):351-5
Date
Feb-10-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Education, Medical - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Health Plan Implementation - economics - organization & administration - trends
Humans
Internship and Residency - economics
Physician Incentive Plans - economics - trends
Program Evaluation - trends
Retrospective Studies
Rural Health Services - economics - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This paper describes the development and characteristics of a comprehensive, integrated and sustained program for the education, recruitment and retention of physicians for rural practice in Alberta--the Rural Physician Action Plan. The participation of key stakeholders (including government, the provincial medical association, the licensing authority, faculties of medicine, practising rural physicians and regional health authorities) and a sustained program budget have been key organizational issues for success. Critical to the effectiveness of this program has been the focus on professional and lifestyle issues targeting 3 distinct groups: physicians in training, physicians in practice, and rural communities and health authorities. Substantial program funding since 1991-92 of up to $3 million per year has increased rural-based activities significantly. For example, 87% of medical students and 91% of residents in family medicine in Alberta now experience 4 weeks or more of rural practice. The authors believe that the historic issues and recent trends militating against recruitment and retention of rural physicians will continue unchecked without comprehensive and sustained approaches such as Alberta's Rural Physician Action Plan.
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 1992 Sep 1;147(5):617-231521207
Cites: J Contin Educ Health Prof. 1990;10(3):237-4310124693
Comment In: CMAJ. 1998 May 19;158(10):1269; author reply 1269-709614816
Comment In: CMAJ. 1998 May 19;158(10):1269; author reply 1269-709614817
PubMed ID
9484262 View in PubMed
Less detail

AMWA's role in women's health curriculum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154330
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2008 Dec;17(10):1555
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Janice Werbinski
Author Affiliation
American College of Women's Health Physicians, Inc., Portage, Michigan 49002, USA. drwerb@aol.com
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2008 Dec;17(10):1555
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Curriculum
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Internet - organization & administration
United States
Women's health
Women's Health Services - organization & administration
PubMed ID
19000031 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Nov 15;143(10):1097-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1990
Author
M J Ashley
J M Brewster
Y C Chow
J G Rankin
E. Single
H A Skinner
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto.
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Nov 15;143(10):1097-8
Date
Nov-15-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Curriculum - trends
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Humans
Leadership
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
PubMed ID
2224679 View in PubMed
Less detail

An e-learning course in medical immunology: does it improve learning outcome?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125277
Source
Med Teach. 2012;34(9):e649-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Sondre Boye
Torolf Moen
Torstein Vik
Author Affiliation
Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway. sondreb@stud.ntnu.no
Source
Med Teach. 2012;34(9):e649-53
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergy and Immunology - education
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Educational Status
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Learning
Linear Models
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Statistics as Topic
Students, Medical
Teaching - methods
Abstract
E-learning is used by most medical students almost daily and several studies have shown e-learning to improve learning outcome in small-scale interventions. However, few studies have explored the effects of e-learning in immunology.
To study the effect of an e-learning package in immunology on learning outcomes in a written integrated examination and to examine student satisfaction with the e-learning package.
All second-year students at a Norwegian medical school were offered an animated e-learning package in basic immunology as a supplement to the regular teaching. Each student's log-on-time was recorded and linked with the student's score on multiple choice questions included in an integrated end-of-the-year written examination. Student satisfaction was assessed through a questionnaire.
The intermediate-range students (interquartile range) on average scored 3.6% better on the immunology part of the examination per hour they had used the e-learning package (p = 0.0046) and log-on-time explained 17% of the variance in immunology score. The best and the less skilled students' examination outcomes were not affected by the e-learning. The e-learning was well appreciated among the students.
Use of an e-learning package in immunology in addition to regular teaching improved learning outcomes for intermediate-range students.
Notes
Comment In: Med Teach. 2012;34(12):1087-822931144
PubMed ID
22497322 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in residents' opportunities for experiential learning over time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118774
Source
Med Educ. 2012 Dec;46(12):1189-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Adam D Peets
Henry T Stelfox
Author Affiliation
Division of Critical Care Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Med Educ. 2012 Dec;46(12):1189-93
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Canada
Cohort Studies
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Humans
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Internship and Residency - organization & administration
Problem-Based Learning - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
Learning in the clinical environment is believed to be a crucial component of residency training. However, it remains unclear whether recent changes to postgraduate medical education, including the implementation of work hour limitations, have significantly impacted opportunities for experiential learning. Therefore, we sought to quantify opportunities to gain clinical experience within medical-surgical intensive care units (ICUs) over time.
Data on the numbers of patients admitted and invasive procedures performed per day between 1 July 2001 and 30 June 2010 within three academic medical-surgical ICUs in Calgary, Alberta, Canada were obtained from electronic medical records. These data were matched to resident doctor on-call schedules and residents' opportunities to admit patients and participate in procedures were calculated and compared over time using Spearman's rho.
We found that over a 9-year period, the opportunities afforded to residents (n = 1156) to admit patients (n = 17 189) and perform procedures (n = 52 827) during ICU rotations decreased by 32% (p
PubMed ID
23171261 View in PubMed
Less detail

66 records – page 1 of 7.