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[About making up for manpower resource of paramedical personnel].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112667
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2013 Mar-Apr;(2):38-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
I I Grekova
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2013 Mar-Apr;(2):38-40
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allied Health Personnel - education - supply & distribution
Education, Medical - methods
Emergency Medical Technicians - education - supply & distribution
Female
Health Manpower - organization & administration
Health Resources - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Abstract
The article deals with the analysis of quality of training of paramedical personnel in the medical colleges of Kursk oblast during last ten years. It is established that during last decade the number of graduates of the Kursk medical college has a tendency to decrease. If in 2001 the college graduated 169 medical nurses, 44 feldshers, and 30 midwives (243 in total) then in 2011 graduated 121 medical nurses, 64 feldshers (185 in totals). The number of college entrants with 11th grade is decreasing against the background of increasing of number of college entrants with 9th grade. Basically, the educational institutions are completed with graduates of rural schools whose resources are limited. The graduates from urban schools have no intent to acquire the profession of medical nurse. Hence, in Kursk oblast under annual decrease of number of paramedical personnel concurrently decreases number of graduates of medical colleges. This situation makes quite problematic the making up of manpower resource both in nowadays and in near-term outlook.
PubMed ID
23808043 View in PubMed
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"A chance to show yourself" - how do applicants approach medical school admission essays?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131055
Source
Med Teach. 2011;33(10):e541-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Jonathan S White
Jean-Francois Lemay
Keith Brownell
Jocelyn Lockyer
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Canada. jswhite1@ualberta.ca
Source
Med Teach. 2011;33(10):e541-8
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical - methods
Educational Status
Humans
Pilot Projects
Qualitative Research
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Medical
Tape Recording
Test Taking Skills - methods - psychology
Writing
Abstract
Although essay questions are used in the admissions process in many medical schools, there has been little research on how applicants respond to essay questions.
The purpose of this study was to explore how applicants to medical school approach essay questions used in the selection process.
Qualitative analysis was conducted on 240 randomly selected essays written by individuals applying to a single Canadian medical school in 2007 using a modified grounded theory approach to develop a conceptual framework which was checked in interviews with applicants.
Three core variables were identified: "balancing service and reward," "anticipating the physician role," and "readiness." We described the overall approach of applicants as "taking stock," writing about their journeys to the selection process, their experiences of the process itself, and about their anticipated future in medicine.
Our findings suggest a disconnect between the approach of the applicants (to "show themselves" and be selected as individuals) and the stated intent of the process (to select applicants based on "objective" criteria). Our findings raise important questions about how applicants represent themselves when applying for medical school and suggest that it is important to understand the applicant's point of view when developing questions for selection processes.
PubMed ID
21942490 View in PubMed
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An approach to integrating interprofessional education in collaborative mental health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124943
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2012 Mar 1;36(2):91-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2012
Author
Vernon Curran
Olga Heath
Tanis Adey
Terrance Callahan
David Craig
Taryn Hearn
Hubert White
Ann Hollett
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada. vcurran@mun.ca
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2012 Mar 1;36(2):91-5
Date
Mar-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cooperative Behavior
Curriculum
Education, Medical - methods
Faculty
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Interprofessional Relations
Mental health services
Newfoundland and Labrador
Patient care team
Problem-Based Learning - methods
Students, Medical
Universities
Abstract
This article describes an evaluation of a curriculum approach to integrating interprofessional education (IPE) in collaborative mental health practice across the pre- to post-licensure continuum of medical education.
A systematic evaluation of IPE activities was conducted, utilizing a combination of evaluation study designs, including: pretest-posttest control group; one-group pre-test-post-test; and one-shot case study. Participant satisfaction, attitudes toward teamwork, and self-reported teamwork abilities were key evaluative outcome measures.
IPE in collaborative mental health practice was well received at both the pre- and post-licensure levels. Satisfaction scores were very high, and students, trainees, and practitioners welcomed the opportunity to learn about collaboration in the context of mental health. Medical student satisfaction increased significantly with the introduction of standardized patients (SPs) as an interprofessional learning method. Medical students and faculty reported that experiential learning in practice-based settings is a key component of effective approaches to IPE implementation. At a post-licensure level, practitioners reported significant improvement in attitudes toward interprofessional collaboration in mental health care after participation in IPE.
IPE in collaborative mental health is feasible, and mental health settings offer practical and useful learning experiences for students, trainees, and practitioners in interprofessional collaboration.
PubMed ID
22532196 View in PubMed
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Source
Educ Health (Abingdon). 2006 Mar;19(1):117-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006

Application of business case analysis in planning a province-wide telehealth network in Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198712
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2000;6 Suppl 1:S87-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
L. Weaver
D. Spence
Author Affiliation
TecKnowledge Healthcare Systems Inc., Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. linda.weaver@tecknowledge.ca
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2000;6 Suppl 1:S87-9
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Education, Medical - methods
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Health Plan Implementation
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Humans
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Radiology - methods
Rural Health Services - standards
Telemedicine - organization & administration
Abstract
A strategy for implementing telemedicine throughout Alberta was developed. The model was based on a comprehensive evaluation of the four clinical specialties chosen as representative telemedicine services--radiology, psychiatry, emergency services and continuing education. The goals of the telemedicine network were to improve access to health services, provide support for rural health-care providers and increase the efficiency of specialized services. The findings showed that the success factors in a national telemedicine programme depend on a clear organizational structure, with appropriate technical standards and support.
PubMed ID
10793983 View in PubMed
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[Can medical students learn urology at county hospitals? Report from an IT-based developmental project in medical education].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155272
Source
Lakartidningen. 2008 Aug 6-19;105(32-33):2171-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Truls Gårdmark
Johan Heinius
Per-Uno Malmström
Author Affiliation
Kirurgdivisionen, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala. truls.gardmark@surgsci.uu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2008 Aug 6-19;105(32-33):2171-4
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer-Assisted Instruction
Education, Medical - methods
Hospitals, County
Humans
Internet
Learning
Questionnaires
Software
Students, Medical
Sweden
Urology - education
User-Computer Interface
PubMed ID
18780690 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of simulation activities at North American medical schools and teaching hospitals: an AAMC-SSH-ASPE-AACN collaboration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121493
Source
Simul Healthc. 2012 Dec;7(6):329-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Grace C Huang
Heather Sacks
Michael Devita
Robby Reynolds
Wendy Gammon
Michael Saleh
Gayle Gliva-McConvey
Tamara Owens
Julie Anderson
Kristina Stillsmoking
Mary Cantrell
Morgan Passiment
Author Affiliation
Shapiro Institute for Education and Research at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Ave, E/ES-212, Boston, MA 02215, USA. ghuang@bidmc.harvard.edu
Source
Simul Healthc. 2012 Dec;7(6):329-33
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Competence
Computer Simulation - utilization
Data Collection
Education, Medical - methods - statistics & numerical data - trends
Educational Measurement - methods - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Teaching - methods - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Schools, Medical - statistics & numerical data - trends
United States
Abstract
In September 2011, the Association of American Medical Colleges released the results of a survey conducted in 2010 on simulation activities at its member medical schools and teaching hospitals. In this commentary, we offer a synthesis of data and conclude that (1) simulation is used broadly at Association of American Medical Colleges member institutions, for many types of learners, including other health care professionals; (2) it addresses core training competencies and has many educational purposes; (3) its use in learner assessment is more prevalent at medical schools but is still significant at teaching hospitals; and (4) it requires a considerable investment of money, space, personnel, and time. These data confirm general perceptions about the state of simulation in North America for physician training. Future endeavors should include a more granular examination of how simulation is integrated into curricula, a similar survey of other health care-related institutions and professions, and a periodic assessment to characterize trends over time.
PubMed ID
22902605 View in PubMed
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Child and youth telepsychiatry in rural and remote primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139149
Source
Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am. 2011 Jan;20(1):13-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Antonio Pignatiello
John Teshima
Katherine M Boydell
Debbie Minden
Tiziana Volpe
Peter G Braunberger
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, TeleLink Mental Health Program, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am. 2011 Jan;20(1):13-28
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Community Mental Health Services - methods
Education, Medical - methods
Humans
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Primary Health Care - methods
Rural Health Services - supply & distribution
Telemedicine - methods
Videoconferencing
Abstract
Young people with psychological or psychiatric problems are managed largely by primary care practitioners, many of whom feel inadequately trained, ill equipped, and uncomfortable with this responsibility. Accessing specialist pediatric and psychological services, often located in and near large urban centers, is a particular challenge for rural and remote communities. Live interactive videoconferencing technology (telepsychiatry) presents innovative opportunities to bridge these service gaps. The TeleLink Mental Health Program at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto offers a comprehensive, collaborative model of enhancing local community systems of care in rural and remote Ontario using videoconferencing. With a focus on clinical consultation, collaborative care, education and training, evaluation, and research, ready access to pediatric psychiatrists and other specialist mental health service providers can effectively extend the boundaries of the medical home. Medical trainees in urban teaching centers are also expanding their knowledge of and comfort level with rural mental health issues, various complementary service models, and the potentials of videoconferencing in providing psychiatric and psychological services. Committed and enthusiastic champions, a positive attitude, creativity, and flexibility are a few of the necessary attributes ensuring viability and integration of telemental health programs.
PubMed ID
21092909 View in PubMed
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Clarifying the learning experiences of healthcare professionals with in situ and off-site simulation-based medical education: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274665
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(10):e008345
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jette Led Sørensen
Laura Emdal Navne
Helle Max Martin
Bent Ottesen
Charlotte Krebs Albrecthsen
Berit Woetmann Pedersen
Hanne Kjærgaard
Cees van der Vleuten
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(10):e008345
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Computer simulation
Denmark
Education, Medical - methods
Educational Measurement
Female
Health Personnel - education
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obstetrics - education
Patient care team
Pregnancy
Qualitative Research
Abstract
To examine how the setting in in situ simulation (ISS) and off-site simulation (OSS) in simulation-based medical education affects the perceptions and learning experience of healthcare professionals.
Qualitative study using focus groups and content analysis.
Twenty-five healthcare professionals (obstetricians, midwives, auxiliary nurses, anaesthesiologists, a nurse anaesthetist and operating theatre nurse) participated in four focus groups and were recruited due to their exposure to either ISS or OSS in multidisciplinary obstetric emergencies in a randomised trial.
Departments of obstetrics and anaesthesia, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Initially participants preferred ISS, but this changed after the training when the simulation site became of less importance. There was a strong preference for simulation in authentic roles. These perceptions were independent of the ISS or OSS setting. Several positive and negative factors in simulation were identified, but these had no relation to the simulation setting. Participants from ISS and OSS generated a better understanding of and collaboration with the various health professionals. They also provided individual and team reflections on learning. ISS participants described more experiences that would involve organisational changes than the OSS participants did.
Many psychological and sociological aspects related to the authenticity of the learning experience are important in simulation, but the physical setting of the simulation as an ISS and OSS is the least important. Based on these focus groups OSS can be used provided that all other authenticity elements are taken into consideration and respected. The only difference was that ISS had an organisational impact and ISS participants talked more about issues that would involve practical organisational changes. ISS and OSS participants did, however, go through similar individual and team learning experiences.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26443655 View in PubMed
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96 records – page 1 of 10.