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The current status of medical genetics instruction in US and Canadian medical schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163942
Source
Acad Med. 2007 May;82(5):441-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Virginia Carol Thurston
Paula Sue Wales
Mary Alice Bell
Laura Torbeck
James Joseph Brokaw
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA. vthursto@iupui.edu
Source
Acad Med. 2007 May;82(5):441-5
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Curriculum - standards - trends
Data Collection
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - standards - trends
Faculty, Medical
Genetics, Medical - education
Humans
Indiana
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical - trends
United States
Abstract
Relatively little is known about how medical genetics is being taught in the undergraduate medical curriculum and whether educators concur regarding topical priority. This study sought to document the current state of medical genetics education in U.S. and Canadian accredited medical schools.
In August 2004, surveys were sent from the Indiana University School of Medicine to 149 U.S. and Canadian medical genetics course directors or curricular deans. Returned surveys were collected through June 2005. Participants were asked about material covered, number of contact hours, year in which the course was offered, and what department sponsored the course. Data were collated according to instructional method and course content.
The response rate was 75.2%. Most respondents (77%) taught medical genetics in the first year of medical school; only half (47%) reported that medical genetics was incorporated into the third and fourth years. About two thirds of respondents (62%) devoted 20 to 40 hours to medical genetics instruction, which was largely concerned with general concepts (86%) rather than practical application (11%). Forty-six percent of respondents reported teaching a stand-alone course versus 54% who integrated medical genetics into another course. Topics most commonly taught were cancer genetics (94.2%), multifactorial inheritance (91.3%), Mendelian disorders (90.3%), clinical cytogenetics (89.3%), and patterns of inheritance (87.4%).
The findings provide important baseline data relative to guidelines recently established by the Association of American Medical Colleges. Ultimately, improved genetics curricula will help train physicians who are knowledgeable and comfortable discussing and answering questions about genetics with their patients.
PubMed ID
17457062 View in PubMed
Less detail

[History and current situation of medical schools in Finland].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179790
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(8):971-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004

Long-term outcomes for surgeons from 3- and 4-year medical school curricula.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122031
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):S163-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Jocelyn Lockyer
Claudio Violato
Bruce Wright
Herta Fidler
Robert Chan
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Continuing Medical Education and Professional Development, University of Calgary, 3280 Hospital Dr. NW, Calgary, AB. lockyer@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):S163-70
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Career Choice
Clinical Competence
Competency-Based Education
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Graduate - standards - trends
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - standards - trends
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Schools, Medical - standards - trends
Self-Assessment
Students, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Time
Young Adult
Abstract
New approaches are needed to ensure that surgical trainees attain competence in a timely way. Traditional solutions have focused on the years spent in surgic al training. We sought to examine the outcomes of graduates from 3-year versus 4-year medical schools for differences in surgeon performance based on multisource feedback data.
We used data from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta's Physician Achievement Review program to determine curricular outcomes. Data for each surgeon included assessments from 25 patients, 8 medical colleagues and 8 nonphysician coworkers (e.g., nurses), and a self-assessment. We used these data to compare 72 physicians from a 3-year school matched with graduates from 4-year schools. The instruments were assessed for evidence of validity and reliability. We compared the groups using 1-way analysis of covariance and multivariate analysis of covariance, with years since graduation as a covariate, and a Cohen d effect size calculation to assess the magnitude of the change.
Data for 216 surgeons indicated that there was evidence for instrument validity and reliability. No significant differences were found based on the length of the undergraduate program for any of the questionnaires or factors within the questionnaires.
Reconsideration might be given to the time spent in medical school before surgical training if training in the specialty and career years are to be maximized. This assumes that students are able to make informed career decisions based on clerkship and other experiences in a 3-year setting.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22854154 View in PubMed
Less detail

Needs assessment of undergraduate education in otolaryngology among family medicine residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153283
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2008 Oct;37(5):668-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Jordan T Glicksman
Michael G Brandt
Jennifer Parr
Kevin Fung
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Schulich School of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario.
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2008 Oct;37(5):668-75
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - standards - trends
Family Practice - education
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Otolaryngology - education
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the adequacy of otolaryngology teaching in undergraduate medical education (UME) and to determine the general level of comfort of family medicine residents in managing and assessing diseases affecting the ears, nose, and throat.
Cross-sectional survey.
A sample of family medicine residents at the University of Western Ontario (N = 68) completed a questionnaire inquiring into their exposure to topics in otolaryngology during their UME. They were also asked to comment on their present comfort with knowledge and skills specific to otolaryngology.
Family medicine residents suggest that there is generally little otolaryngology training in UME; 66.7% of respondents who received UME in Canada suggested that they received very little classroom instruction and 75.6% received very little clinical otolaryngology instruction. Residents identified specific otolaryngologic conditions with which they felt particularly uncomfortable.
This study demonstrated that students receive very little exposure to otolaryngology in UME and highlighted specific conditions and procedures that family medicine residents lack confidence in managing and performing.
PubMed ID
19128674 View in PubMed
Less detail

[What every doctor should learn from psychiatry].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177277
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(17):2095-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004

7 records – page 1 of 1.