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Building the new Northern Ontario Rural Medical School.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189925
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2002 Apr;10(2):112-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
James T B Rourke
Author Affiliation
NORMS Medical Education Design Team, Ontario, Canada. james.rourke@sworm.on.ca
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2002 Apr;10(2):112-6
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
Humans
Medically underserved area
Ontario
Rural Health
Schools, Medical
Abstract
The new Northern Ontario Rural Medical School is to be developed to have a significant impact on the education, recruitment, and retention of physicians in rural and northern Ontario and Canada. It will be a collaborative partnership between Laurentian University, Sudbury and Lakehead University, Thunder Bay (1000 km apart), and will have a network of learning sites throughout Northern Ontario (almost 1,000,000 km2). The curriculum will be patient-centred, clinical problem-based, and systems-organised, with a significant health determinant focus, and Aboriginal health content and context. Small group learning will be used in a distributed learning network with advanced information technology support. The new Northern Ontario Rural Medical School will aim to graduate highly qualified physicians with state-of-the-art medical education, with enhanced knowledge, skills, and interest, in Aboriginal, rural, northern, and under serviced health care.
PubMed ID
12047506 View in PubMed
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"But I see old people everywhere": dispelling the myth that eldercare is learned in nongeriatric clerkships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142491
Source
Acad Med. 2010 Jul;85(7):1221-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Laura Diachun
Lisa Van Bussel
Kevin T Hansen
Andrea Charise
Michael J Rieder
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. Laura.Diachun@sjhc.london.on.ca
Source
Acad Med. 2010 Jul;85(7):1221-8
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Clerkship
Clinical Competence
Cohort Studies
Developed Countries
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
Educational Measurement
Female
Geriatrics - education
Health Care Surveys
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Male
Ontario
Physician-Patient Relations
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Stereotyping
Abstract
To test the assumption that knowledge, attitudes, and skills (KAS) in geriatrics are learned via exposure to elderly patients in nongeriatric clerkships. In the developed world, the proportion of adults > or = 65 years old will soon surpass the proportion of children
PubMed ID
20592520 View in PubMed
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Content in context: medical education and society's needs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202998
Source
Acad Med. 1999 Feb;74(2):143-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
R F Maudsley
Author Affiliation
Division of Medical Education, Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Acad Med. 1999 Feb;74(2):143-5
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Ontario
Physician's Role
Abstract
Many reports have emphasized the need to reform medical education to bring it into harmony with society's needs and expectations. Although much effort has been expended over several decades, many believe that reform initiatives have not successfully modified physicians' behaviors and attitudes. More recently, two major projects--Educating Future Physicians for Ontario and the Medical School Objectives Project--have identified physician roles and attributes necessary to meet societal needs. These efforts have provided a substantial framework upon which the content and conduct of a more relevant kind of medical education can be built. In order to implement real change, however, medical schools must (1) take the long view, making reform part of the entire continuum of medical education; (2) ensure that faculty physicians teach by example; (3) change student assessments to reflect new educational objectives; and (4) reallocate resources to support a changed curriculum.
PubMed ID
10065055 View in PubMed
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Development, implementation, and evaluation of a student-initiated undergraduate medical education elective in HIV care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125825
Source
Med Teach. 2012;34(5):398-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Derek Chew
Denise Jaworsky
Julie Thorne
Meghan Ho
Nisha Andany
Carly Morin
Nikki Hoffman
Christe Henshaw
Sean B Rourke
Mark Fisher
Anita Rachlis
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, ON, Canada. derek.chew@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Med Teach. 2012;34(5):398-403
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Clerkship - methods - organization & administration
Curriculum
Disease Management
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
HIV Infections - psychology - therapy - transmission
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Ontario
Physician-Patient Relations
Program Development
Program Evaluation - methods
Abstract
The literature indicates that medical students require more comprehensive HIV training.
Medical students at the University of Toronto developed and implemented the preclerkship HIV elective (PHE) with the aim to increase trainee HIV knowledge, address important issues in HIV care, and prepare students to serve affected populations.
Developed in partnership with the Ontario HIV Treatment Network and in consultation with local AIDS service organizations and the University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine, the PHE was inaugurated in November 2008 as an elective supplement to medical curriculum content. Eighteen second-year medical students participated in the PHE, consisting of lectures, small group sessions, clinical observerships, community placements, reading assignments, and an HIV counseling and testing workshop. Participants completed a self-assessment of HIV knowledge prior to starting and after PHE completion.
Self-assessment scores of HIV knowledge among PHE participants significantly increased from 78.1% (pre-PHE) to 90.2% (post-PHE) (p?=?0.0016). Common themes from feedback on participant satisfaction included enthusiasm for small group sessions, clinical observerships, community agency placements, and the diversity of topics covered.
Student-run initiatives can supplement medical curriculum content and program feedback may be used to advocate for curriculum changes. Factors influencing success include student leadership and interest, community partnerships, and faculty mentorship.
PubMed ID
22449272 View in PubMed
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The development of medical education on alcohol- and drug-related problems at the University of Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228003
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Nov 15;143(10):1083-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1990
Author
J G Rankin
Author Affiliation
Addiction Research Foundation Clinical Institute, Toronto, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Nov 15;143(10):1083-91
Date
Nov-15-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Curriculum - trends
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Education, Medical, Graduate - organization & administration
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
Humans
Internship and Residency - organization & administration
Ontario
Physician's Role
Social Responsibility
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Time Factors
Abstract
Medical education on alcohol- and drug-related problems at the University of Toronto covers undergraduate, residency and graduate programs, a result of collaboration since 1959 between the university and the Addiction Research Foundation of Ontario. An undergraduate core curriculum, developed in the early 1970s, is offered in year 2; it has been supplemented by electives, selectives and comprehensive clinics. The undergraduate program is rated highly by students; since 1978, 3024 have completed the core program. Residency training started in 1974 and is available through electives lasting from 1 to 12 months in internal medicine, psychiatry, and family and community medicine. To date, 370 residents have completed one of these electives; 129 have completed graduate programs in which their theses concerned alcohol- and drug-related topics, and there have been an additional 13 research and postdoctoral fellows. Despite the progress, there is still a need to improve and expand the undergraduate and residency programs and to develop an effective program of continuing medical education. The goals should be to ensure that, as far as possible, all medical graduates from the University of Toronto have the knowledge, attitudes, skills and behaviours needed to contribute effectively to the prevention and treatment of alcohol- and drug-related problems in their chosen field of practice and to avoid problems from their personal use of alcohol and other drugs.
PubMed ID
2224677 View in PubMed
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Integration of community health teaching in the undergraduate medicine curriculum at the University of Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130557
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2011 Oct;41(4 Suppl 3):S176-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Ian L Johnson
Fran E Scott
Niall P Byrne
Katherine A MacRury
Jay Rosenfield
Author Affiliation
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ian.johnson@oahpp.ca
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2011 Oct;41(4 Suppl 3):S176-80
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Curriculum - trends
Decision Making
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration - trends
Humans
Ontario
Public Health - education
Students, Medical - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
In 1999, Determinants of Community Health was introduced at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto. The course spanned all 4 years of the undergraduate curriculum and focused on addressing individual patient and community needs, prevention and population health, and diverse learning contexts.
To demonstrate the value of an integrated, longitudinal approach to the efficiency of delivering a public health curriculum.
Time-series comparing the curricular change over two periods of time.
Undergraduate medical students from 1993 to 2009.
Using a spiral curriculum, the educational materials are integrated across all 4 years, based on the concept of medical decision making in a community context.
This study compares measures of student satisfaction and national rankings of the University of Toronto with the other 16 Canadian medical schools for the "Population Health, Ethical, Legal, and Organizational aspects of the practice of medicine" component of the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part 1.
The University of Toronto has been ranked either first or second place nationally, in comparison to lower rankings in previous years (p
PubMed ID
21961661 View in PubMed
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Rural background and clinical rural rotations during medical training: effect on practice location.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202208
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Apr 20;160(8):1159-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-20-1999
Author
M. Easterbrook
M. Godwin
R. Wilson
G. Hodgetts
G. Brown
R. Pong
E. Najgebauer
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Kingston, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Apr 20;160(8):1159-63
Date
Apr-20-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Career Choice
Clinical Competence
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Internship and Residency - organization & administration
Male
Ontario
Physicians, Family - psychology - supply & distribution
Professional Practice Location - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Rural Health Services - manpower
Abstract
Providing health care services in rural communities in Canada remains a challenge. What affects a family medicine resident's decision concerning practice location? Does the resident's background or exposure to rural practice during clinical rotations affect that decision?
Cross-sectional mail survey of 159 physicians who graduated from the Family Medicine Program at Queen's University, Kingston, Ont., between 1977 and 1991. The outcome variables of interest were the size of community in which the graduate chose to practise on completion of training (rural [population less than 10,000] v. nonrural [population 10,000 or more]) and the size of community of practice when the survey was conducted (1993). The predictor or independent variables were age, sex, number of years in practice, exposure to rural practice during undergraduate and residency training, and size of hometown.
Physicians who were raised in rural communities were 2.3 times more likely than those from nonrural communities to choose to practise in a rural community immediately after graduation (95% confidence interval 1.43-3.69, p = 0.001). They were also 2.5 times more likely to still be in rural practice at the time of the survey (95% confidence interval 1.53-4.01, p = 0.001). There was no association between exposure to rural practice during undergraduate or residency training and choosing to practise in a rural community.
Physicians who have roots in rural Canada are more likely to practise in rural Canada than those without such a background.
Notes
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Cites: CMAJ. 1992 Sep 1;147(5):617-231521207
Comment In: CMAJ. 1999 Apr 20;160(8):1173-410234349
PubMed ID
10234346 View in PubMed
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Validity of admissions measures in predicting performance outcomes: the contribution of cognitive and non-cognitive dimensions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191332
Source
Teach Learn Med. 2002;14(1):34-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Chan Kulatunga-Moruzi
Geoffrey R Norman
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, McMaster University, Hamilton ON, L8S 4K1, Canada. kulatuc@mcmaster.ca
Source
Teach Learn Med. 2002;14(1):34-42
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cognition
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
Educational Measurement
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Ontario
Problem Solving
Regression Analysis
School Admission Criteria
Students, Medical - psychology
Abstract
Admissions committees face the daunting task of selecting a small number of candidates who are most likely to succeed in medical school from a large pool of seemingly suitable applicants. While numerous studies have shown moderate correlations among measures of academic performance, predictors of the non-cognitive domain (e.g. interpersonal, communication, ethical) remain elusive, in part because of the absence of a sound criterion measure.
We examined the utility of several cognitive and non-cognitive criteria used in the admissions processes in predicting both cognitive and non-cognitive dimensions of the licencing examinations of the Medical Council of Canada (LMCC).
Predictors included: undergraduate GPA, undergraduate science GPA, an autobiographical letter, scores from a simulated tutorial, a personal interview and the MCAT. Of specific interest was the relation between measures of communication and problem-exploration skills as assessed during the admissions process and Part II of the LMCC Examination, a multi-station OSCE.
Undergraduate GPAs were found to have the most utility in predicting both academic and clinical performance. Scores derived from the simulated tutorial did not predict future performance. The MCAT Verbal Reasoning score and the personal interview were found to be useful in predicting communication skills on the LMCC Part II.
The results have implications for any school that uses the interview as an admissions tool.
PubMed ID
11865747 View in PubMed
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When a community hospital becomes an academic health centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146098
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2010;15(1):19-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Maureen Topps
Roger Strasser
Author Affiliation
Postgraduate Education, Northern Ontario School of Medicine, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury ON P3E 2C6, USA. maureen.topps@normed.ca
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2010;15(1):19-25
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - organization & administration
Accreditation - organization & administration
Clinical Competence
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Medical, Graduate - organization & administration
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Medical - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Hospital Restructuring - organization & administration
Hospitals, Community - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Models, Educational
Models, organizational
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Objectives
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Abstract
With the burgeoning role of distributed medical education and the increasing use of community hospitals for training purposes, challenges arise for undergraduate and postgraduate programs expanding beyond traditional tertiary care models. It is of vital importance to encourage community hospitals and clinical faculty to embrace their roles in medical education for the 21st century. With no university hospitals in northern Ontario, the Northern Ontario School of Medicine and its educational partner hospitals identified questions of concern and collaborated to implement changes. Several themes emerged that are of relevance to any medical educational program expanding beyond its present location. Critical areas for attention include the institutional culture; human, physical and financial resources; and support for educational activities. It is important to establish and maintain the groundwork necessary for the development of thriving integrated community-engaged medical education. Done in tandem with advocacy for change in funding models, this will allow movement beyond the current educational environment. The ultimate goal is successful integration of university and accreditation ideals with practical hands-on medical care and education in new environments.
PubMed ID
20070926 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.