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Creating stories to live by: caring and professional identity formation in a longitudinal integrated clerkship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129914
Source
Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2012 Oct;17(4):585-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Jill Konkin
Carol Suddards
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Engagement, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, 2-115 Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, Edmonton, AB T6G 2C9, Canada. jill.konkin@ualberta.ca
Source
Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2012 Oct;17(4):585-96
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Clinical Clerkship - organization & administration - standards
Continuity of Patient Care
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration - standards
Empathy
Family Practice - education
Humans
Physician-Patient Relations
Preceptorship - organization & administration - standards
Rural Health Services - manpower - organization & administration - standards
Social Responsibility
Students, Medical - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
Building on other models of longitudinal integrated clerkships (LIC), the University of Alberta developed its Integrated Community Clerkship with guiding principles of continuity of care, preceptor and learning environment. Professionalism is an important theme in medical education. Caring is important in professional identity formation and an ethic of caring is a moral framework for caring. This study explored the development of an ethic of caring in an LIC using empathy, compassion and taking responsibility as descriptors of caring. Through a hermeneutic phenomenological study, the authors focused on students' accounts of being with patients. Following an iterative process of successive analyses and explorations of the relevant literature, sensitizing concepts related to physician identity, and an ethic of caring were used to make sense of these accounts following the principles of constructivist grounded theory methodology. Continuity afforded by the LIC results in a safe environment in which students can meaningfully engage with patients and take responsibility for their care under the supervision of a physician teacher. Together these attributes foster an emerging physician identity born at the site of patient-student interaction and grounded in an ethic of caring. A medical student's evolving professional identity in the clerkship includes the emergence of an ethic of caring. Student accounts of being with patients demonstrate that the LIC at the University of Alberta affords opportunities for students be receptive to and responsible for their patients. This ethic of caring is part of an emerging physician identity for the study participants.
Notes
Comment In: Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2013 Mar;18(1):139-4023114459
Comment In: Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2013 Mar;18(1):135-823114458
PubMed ID
22052211 View in PubMed
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Making medical student course evaluations meaningful: implementation of an intensive course review protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273233
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2015;15:99
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Patrick Fleming
Olga Heath
Alan Goodridge
Vernon Curran
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2015;15:99
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Benchmarking - organization & administration - standards
Curriculum - standards
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Models, Educational
Newfoundland and Labrador
Statistics, nonparametric
Students, Medical - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Ongoing course evaluation is a key component of quality improvement in higher education. The complexities associated with delivering high quality medical education programs involving multiple lecturers can make course and instructor evaluation challenging. We describe the implementation and evaluation of an "intensive course review protocol" in an undergraduate medical program
We examined pre-clerkship courses from 2006 to 2011 - prior to and following protocol implementation. Our non-parametric analysis included Mann-Whitney U tests to compare the 2006/07 and 2010/11 academic years.
We included 30 courses in our analysis. In the 2006/07 academic year, 13/30 courses (43.3 %) did not meet the minimum benchmark and were put under intensive review. By 2010/11, only 3/30 courses (10.0 %) were still below the minimum benchmark. Compared to 2006/07, courses ratings in the 2010/11 year were significantly higher (p?=?0.004). However, during the study period mean response rates fell from 76.5 % in 2006/07 to 49.7 % in 2010/11.
These results suggest an intensive course review protocol can have a significant impact on pre-clerkship course ratings in an undergraduate medical program. Reductions in survey response rates represent an ongoing challenge in the interpretation of student feedback.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26041364 View in PubMed
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Medical students' experiences of their own professional development during three clinical terms: a prospective follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281292
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2017 Feb 27;17(1):47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-27-2017
Author
Susanne Kalén
Hanna Lachmann
Maria Varttinen
Riitta Möller
Tomas S Bexelius
Sari Ponzer
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2017 Feb 27;17(1):47
Date
Feb-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Competency-Based Education - organization & administration - standards
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration - standards
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Professional Competence
Prospective Studies
Qualitative Research
Students, Medical - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
A modern competency-based medical education is well implemented globally, but less is known about how the included learning activities contribute to medical students' professional development. The aim of this study was to explore Swedish medical students' perceptions of the offered learning activities and their experiences of how these activities were connected to their professional development as defined by the CanMEDS framework.
A prospective mixed method questionnaire study during three terms (internal medicine, scientific project, and surgery) in which data were collected by using contextual activity sampling system, i.e., the students were sent a questionnaire via their mobile phones every third week. All 136 medical students in the 6th of 11 terms in the autumn of 2012 were invited to participate. Seventy-four students (54%) filled in all of the required questionnaires (4 per term) for inclusion, the total number of questionnaires being 1335. The questionnaires focused on the students' experiences of learning activities, especially in relation to the CanMEDS Roles, collaboration with others and emotions (positive, negative, optimal experiences, i.e., "flow") related to the studies. The quantitative data was analysed statistically and, for the open-ended questions, manifest inductive content analysis was used.
Three of the CanMEDs Roles, Medical Expert, Scholar, and Communicator, were most frequently reported while the four others, e.g., the role Health Advocate, were less common. Collaboration with students from other professions was most usual during the 8th term. Positive emotions and experience of "flow" were most often reported during clinical learning activities while the scientific project term was connected with more negative emotions.
Our results showed that it is possible, even during clinical courses, to visualise the different areas of professional competence defined in the curriculum and connect these competences to the actual learning activities. Students halfway through their medical education considered the most important learning activities for their professional development to be connected with the Roles of Medical Expert, Scholar, and Communicator. Given that each of the CanMEDS Roles is at least moderately important during undergraduate medical education, the entire spectrum of the Roles should be emphasised and developed during the clinical years.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28241756 View in PubMed
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