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An interprofessional education pilot program in maternity care: findings from an exploratory case study of undergraduate students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127906
Source
J Interprof Care. 2012 May;26(3):183-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Filomena Meffe
Catherine Claire Moravac
Sherry Espin
Author Affiliation
St. Michael's Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. filomena.meffe@utoronto.ca
Source
J Interprof Care. 2012 May;26(3):183-8
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing - organization & administration
Hospitals, Teaching - organization & administration
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Interdisciplinary Studies
Interprofessional Relations
Learning
Maternal health services
Midwifery - education
Pilot Projects
Abstract
An interprofessional team of maternity care providers and academics developed a pilot interprofessional education (IPE) program in maternity care for undergraduate students in nursing, midwifery and medicine. There are few published studies examining IPE programs in maternity care, particularly at the undergraduate level, that examine long-term outcomes. This paper outlines findings from a case study that explored how participation in an IPE program in maternity care may enhance student knowledge, skills/attitudes, and may promote their collaborative behavior in the practice setting. The program was launched at a Canadian urban teaching hospital and consisted of six workshops and two clinical shadowing experiences. Twenty-five semi-structured, in-depth interviews were completed with nine participants at various time points up to 20 months post-program. Qualitative analysis of transcripts revealed the emergence of four themes: relationship-building, confident communication, willingness to collaborate and woman/family-centered care. Participant statements about their intentions to continue practicing interprofessional collaboration more than a year post-program lend support to its sustained effectiveness. The provision of a safe learning environment, the use of small group learning techniques with mixed teaching strategies, augmented by exposure to an interprofessional faculty, contributed to the program's perceived success.
PubMed ID
22251306 View in PubMed
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Facilitating interprofessional education and practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157913
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Mar;104(3):22-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Anne J Kearney
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing and Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Mar;104(3):22-6
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Cooperative Behavior
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Pharmacy - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Newfoundland and Labrador
Organizational Objectives
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Social Work - education
Abstract
Collaborative patient-centred care has the potential to address serious issues in the Canadian health-care system such as those related to increasing complexity of care; patient safety and access; and recruitment and retention of health human resources. This approach involves teams of health professionals working together to provide more coordinated and comprehensive care to clients. It places priority on the preferences of the patient and fosters respect for the skills and perspectives of all health-care providers. Interprofessional education at the undergraduate, graduate and practice levels is essential for facilitating the transition to team-based care. The author presents the rationale for collaborative care and describes an interprofessional education project at Memorial University of Newfoundland that is preparing students and health professionals for this groundbreaking change in practice.
PubMed ID
18386451 View in PubMed
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A qualitative analysis of student Balint groups in medical education: contexts and triggers of case presentations and discussion themes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158647
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Jul;72(1):5-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Martina A Torppa
Eeva Makkonen
Camilla Mårtenson
Kaisu H Pitkälä
Author Affiliation
University of Helsinki, Faculty of Medicine, Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, Finland. martina.torppa@helsinki.fi
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Jul;72(1):5-11
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Conflict (Psychology)
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
Emotions
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Narration
Personality
Physician's Role - psychology
Physician-Patient Relations
Professional Competence
Psychoanalytic Therapy - education - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Self Concept
Social Justice
Socialization
Students, Medical - psychology
Transference (Psychology)
Abstract
No previous rigorous qualitative studies exist on student Balint groups. The aim of this study was to explore the contexts and triggers of cases presented in student Balint groups and to clarify the themes in the group discussions.
Fifteen student Balint sessions in two groups were organised. Nine female students participated. A grounded theory-based approach with thematic content analysis of the field notes was used.
We identified five triggers for case narrations (witnessing injustice, value conflict, difficult human relationships, incurable patient, role confusion) that originated from three distinct contexts (patient encounters, confusing experiences in medical education, tension between privacy and profession). Four main discussion themes could be identified (feelings related to patients, building professional identity, negative role models, cooperation with other medical professionals).
The concept of case in student Balint groups was wider than in traditional Balint groups. Feelings related to patients and to one's own role as a doctor were openly discussed in groups. The discussions often touched on professional growth and future professional identity as doctors.
The Balint groups may support medical students' professional growth process. This topic warrants further study in more heterogeneous student groups.
PubMed ID
18295432 View in PubMed
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When a community hospital becomes an academic health centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146098
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2010;15(1):19-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Maureen Topps
Roger Strasser
Author Affiliation
Postgraduate Education, Northern Ontario School of Medicine, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury ON P3E 2C6, USA. maureen.topps@normed.ca
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2010;15(1):19-25
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - organization & administration
Accreditation - organization & administration
Clinical Competence
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Medical, Graduate - organization & administration
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Medical - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Hospital Restructuring - organization & administration
Hospitals, Community - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Models, Educational
Models, organizational
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Objectives
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Abstract
With the burgeoning role of distributed medical education and the increasing use of community hospitals for training purposes, challenges arise for undergraduate and postgraduate programs expanding beyond traditional tertiary care models. It is of vital importance to encourage community hospitals and clinical faculty to embrace their roles in medical education for the 21st century. With no university hospitals in northern Ontario, the Northern Ontario School of Medicine and its educational partner hospitals identified questions of concern and collaborated to implement changes. Several themes emerged that are of relevance to any medical educational program expanding beyond its present location. Critical areas for attention include the institutional culture; human, physical and financial resources; and support for educational activities. It is important to establish and maintain the groundwork necessary for the development of thriving integrated community-engaged medical education. Done in tandem with advocacy for change in funding models, this will allow movement beyond the current educational environment. The ultimate goal is successful integration of university and accreditation ideals with practical hands-on medical care and education in new environments.
PubMed ID
20070926 View in PubMed
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