Skip header and navigation

Refine By

21 records – page 1 of 3.

[A medical controversy: is orthopedic medicine needed? (1). Development within scientific medicine can be more effective in musculoskeletal pain].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228011
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Nov 14;87(46):3887, 3890
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-14-1990
Author
B. Johansson
Author Affiliation
Svensk förening för ortopedisk medicin, företagsläkare på Scania i Södertälje.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Nov 14;87(46):3887, 3890
Date
Nov-14-1990
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesia - trends
Bone Diseases - diagnosis - therapy
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Graduate - trends
Humans
Muscular Diseases - diagnosis - therapy
Orthopedics - education - trends
Pain - etiology
Pain Management
Sweden
PubMed ID
2233071 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Current problems of the public health X-ray service of the Russian Federation and ways of their solution (according to the analysis materials of their activities of the service in 2001 and its tasks in 2002].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185319
Source
Vestn Rentgenol Radiol. 2002 May-Jun;(3):4-22
Publication Type
Article

[Demographic and professional characteristics of physicians studying at institutes for advanced training].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239692
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1985;(12):32-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985

Dimensioning of the postgraduate educational training in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71744
Source
Cah Sociol Demogr Med. 2001 Jul-Dec;41(3-4):305-11
Publication Type
Article
Author
H. Christensen
H. Bundgaard
K. Frederiksen
K. Bech
Source
Cah Sociol Demogr Med. 2001 Jul-Dec;41(3-4):305-11
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Denmark
Education, Medical, Graduate - trends
Family Practice - manpower - trends
Female
Humans
Male
Specialties, Medical - manpower
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Postgraduate medical training in Denmark consists of basic training, offered to all medical doctors, followed by specialist training. The National Board of Health is responsible for the overall frame of medical training in Denmark and determines the number of trainee positions for each of the 42 specialities available. The total number of positions and their distribution between specialities are based on demand, supply and demographic considerations. Approximately 85% of medical doctors finalise specialist training. METHODS: Denmark is divided into three educational regions: North, South and East. Each region consists of counties, with their own administration. The National Board of Health approves each position for postgraduate training. All new positions and changes of existing positions are evaluated before approval by The National Board of Health. An updated version of the list of educational positions is available on the internet. CONCLUSION: The Danish governmental authorities have an efficient tool to control the dimensioning of the postgraduate medical education and thereby the production of specialists. Medical doctors can easily get information about where to obtain trainee positions. The majority of hospital departments improve their recruitment potential by participating in medical training. A number of structural changes, for instance establishing of medical centres and corporations within larger entities across an extended geographic area, specialisation between hospitals and reduced number of hospitals, calls for decentralisation of the administration in order to improve flexibility in the organisation of postgraduate medical training. However, the National Board of Health will still co-ordinate at the national level.
PubMed ID
11859636 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Doctoral studies at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland[Editorial]].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283448
Source
Laeknabladid. 2017 Apr;103(4):169
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017

Emerging trends and training issues in the psychiatric emergency room.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179628
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2004 May;49(5):suppl 1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Ian Dawe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario. dawei@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2004 May;49(5):suppl 1-6
Date
May-2004
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulances
Canada
Crisis Intervention
Education, Medical, Graduate - trends
Emergency Medicine - education
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - organization & administration - trends
Hospitalization
Humans
Mental Disorders - therapy
Psychiatry - education
Teaching - trends
PubMed ID
15198475 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1999 Nov;45:2568-9, 2581
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999

Geriatric psychiatry education in Canada: the pathway to subspecialty recognition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143509
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2010 Sep;22(6):919-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Melissa H Andrew
Catherine Shea
Author Affiliation
Division of Geriatric Psychiatry, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. andrewm@queensu.ca
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2010 Sep;22(6):919-26
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Curriculum - standards
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Education, Medical, Graduate - trends
Forecasting
Geriatric Psychiatry - education - manpower
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Patient Care Team - standards
Physicians, Primary Care - education
Population Dynamics
Psychiatry - education
Specialization - trends
Abstract
This paper outlines the evolution of the training of Canadian physicians and other professionals in the mental health care needs of older adults over the past 2 decades, which has culminated in long-awaited subspecialty recognition by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC). Despite the fact that Canada has more than 4000 psychiatrists officially recognized by RCPSC, and a national body of more than 200 members who practice primarily in geriatric psychiatry, the status of geriatric psychiatry as a subspecialty of psychiatry in Canada remained "unofficial" until 2009.
Early along the pathway toward subspecialization, Canadian educational efforts focused on enhancing the capacity of primary care physicians and other mental health professionals to meet the mental health needs of older adults. Over the past decade, and with the encouragement of RCPSC, Canadian psychiatric educators have carefully and collaboratively defined the competencies necessary for general psychiatrists to practice across the life span, thereby influencing the psychiatry training programs to include dedicated time in geriatric psychiatry, and a more consistently defined training experience.
With these two important building blocks in place, Canadian psychiatry was truly ready to move ahead with subspecialization. Three new psychiatric subspecialties - geriatric, child and adolescent, and forensic - were approved at the RCPSC in September 2009.
The developments of the past 20 years have paved the way for a subspecialty geriatric psychiatry curriculum that will be well-aligned with a new general psychiatry curriculum, and ready to complement the existing mental health work force with subspecialized skills aimed at caring for the most complex elderly patients.
PubMed ID
20478094 View in PubMed
Less detail

A novel approach for the accurate prediction of thoracic surgery workforce requirements in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103098
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2014 Jul;148(1):7-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Janet P Edwards
Indraneel Datta
John Douglas Hunt
Kevin Stefan
Chad G Ball
Elijah Dixon
Sean C Grondin
Author Affiliation
Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: janetpatriciaedwards@gmail.com.
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2014 Jul;148(1):7-12
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Computer simulation
Education, Medical, Graduate - trends
Forecasting
Health Manpower - trends
Humans
Incidence
Internship and Residency - trends
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - surgery
Models, Theoretical
Physicians - supply & distribution - trends
Thoracic Surgery - education - manpower - trends
Thoracic Surgical Procedures - education - trends
Time Factors
Abstract
To develop a microsimulation model of thoracic surgery workforce supply and demand to forecast future labor requirements.
The Canadian Community Health Survey and Canadian Census data were used to develop a microsimulation model. The demand component simulated the incidence of lung cancer; the supply component simulated the number of practicing thoracic surgeons. The full model predicted the rate of operable lung cancers per surgeon according to varying numbers of graduates per year.
From 2011 to 2030, the Canadian national population will increase by 10 million. The lung cancer incidence rates will increase until 2030, then plateau and decline. The rate will vary by region (12.5% in Western Canada, 37.2% in Eastern Canada) and will be less pronounced in major cities (10.3%). Minor fluctuations in the yearly thoracic surgery graduation rates (range, 4-8) will dramatically affect the future number of practicing surgeons (range, 116-215). The rate of operable lung cancer varies from 35.0 to 64.9 cases per surgeon annually. Training 8 surgeons annually would maintain the current rate of operable lung cancer cases per surgeon per year (range, 32-36). However, this increased rate of training will outpace the lung cancer incidence after 2030.
At the current rate of training, the incidence of operable lung cancer will increase until 2030 and then plateau and decline. The increase will outstrip the supply of thoracic surgeons, but the decline after 2030 will translate into an excess future supply. Minor increases in the rate of training in response to short-term needs could be problematic in the longer term. Unregulated workforce changes should, therefore, be approached with care.
PubMed ID
24787697 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nutritional training in postgraduate medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62259
Source
Med J Aust. 1989 Sep 18;151 Suppl:S26-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-18-1989
Author
B J Strauss
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Vic.
Source
Med J Aust. 1989 Sep 18;151 Suppl:S26-7
Date
Sep-18-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Graduate - trends
England
Health Education - trends
North America
Nutrition - education
Sweden
PubMed ID
2700492 View in PubMed
Less detail

21 records – page 1 of 3.