Skip header and navigation

Refine By

67 records – page 1 of 7.

Abolishment of 24-hour continuous medical call duty in quebec: a quality of life survey of general surgical residents following implementation of the new work-hour restrictions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114387
Source
J Surg Educ. 2013 May-Jun;70(3):296-303
Publication Type
Article
Author
Fadi T Hamadani
Dan Deckelbaum
Alexandre Sauve
Kosar Khwaja
Tarek Razek
Paola Fata
Author Affiliation
McGill University Health Centre, Division of Trauma Surgery, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Surg Educ. 2013 May-Jun;70(3):296-303
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Education, Medical, Graduate - standards
Female
General Surgery - education
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Patient Safety
Quality of Life
Quebec
Questionnaires
Work Schedule Tolerance
Workload - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The implementation of work hour restrictions across North America have resulted in decreased levels of self injury and medical errors for Residents. An arbitration ruling in Quebec has led to further curtailment of work hours beyond that proposed by the ACGME. This may threaten Resident quality of life and in turn decrease the educational quality of surgical residency training.
We administered a quality of life questionnaire with an integrated education quality assessment tool to all General Surgery residents training at McGill 6 months after the work hour restrictions.
Across several strata respondents reveal a decreased sense of educational quality and quality of life.
The arbitration argued that work- hour restrictions would be necessary to improve quality of life for trainees and hence improve patient safety. Results from this study demonstrate the exact opposite in a large majority of respondents, who report a poorer quality of life and a self-reported inability on their part to provide continuous and safe patient care.
PubMed ID
23618437 View in PubMed
Less detail

The acceptability of the multiple mini interview for resident selection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154455
Source
Fam Med. 2008 Nov-Dec;40(10):734-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marianna Hofmeister
Jocelyn Lockyer
Rod Crutcher
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Health Research Centre, Calgary, Alberta. mlhofmei@ucalgary.ca
Source
Fam Med. 2008 Nov-Dec;40(10):734-40
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Canada
Education, Medical, Graduate - standards
Educational Measurement
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency - standards
Interview, Psychological
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Psychological Tests
Psychometrics
United States
Abstract
This study describes and assesses the acceptability of the multiple mini interview (MMI) to both international medical graduate (IMG) applicants to family medicine residency training in Alberta, Canada, and also interviewers for Alberta's International Medical Graduate Program (AIMGP), an Alberta Health and Wellness government initiative designed to help integrate IMGs into Canadian residency training. IMGs are physicians who completed undergraduate medical education outside of Canada and the United States. IMGs who live in the Canadian province of Alberta may obtain a limited number of government-funded positions for residency training by applying to AIMGP.
A literature review and faculty and medical community consultation informed the development of a 12-station MMI designed to identify non-cognitive characteristics associated with professionalism potential. Clinical scenarios were developed by family physicians and medical educators. Applicant and interviewer posttest acceptability was assessed using surveys. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and qualitative data were analyzed using content analysis and thematic description.
Our research demonstrates evidence for applicant and interviewer acceptability of the MMI. Interviewers reported high levels of satisfaction with the time-restricted process that addressed multiple situations pertinent to the Canadian family medicine context. Applicants and interviewers were each satisfied that 8 minutes was enough time at each station. Applicants reported that they felt the process was free from gender and cultural bias. Interviewers agreed that this MMI was a fair assessment of potential for family medicine.
Standardized residency selection interviews can be adapted to measure professionalism potential characteristics important to family medicine in ways that are acceptable to IMG applicants and interviewers.
PubMed ID
18979262 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are Canadian General Internal Medicine training program graduates well prepared for their future careers?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166469
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2006;6:56
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Sharon E Card
Linda Snell
Brian O'Brien
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. sharon.card@saskatoonhealthregion.ca
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2006;6:56
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Clinical Competence
Competency-Based Education
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Graduate - standards
Female
Humans
Institutional Practice - classification - statistics & numerical data
Internal Medicine - education
Male
Needs Assessment
Professional Practice Location - statistics & numerical data
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Abstract
At a time of increased need and demand for general internists in Canada, the attractiveness of generalist careers (including general internal medicine, GIM) has been falling as evidenced by the low number of residents choosing this specialty. One hypothesis for the lack of interest in a generalist career is lack of comfort with the skills needed to practice after training, and the mismatch between the tertiary care, inpatient training environment and "real life". This project was designed to determine perceived effectiveness of training for 10 years of graduates of Canadian GIM programs to assist in the development of curriculum and objectives for general internists that will meet the needs of graduates and ultimately society.
Mailed survey designed to explore perceived importance of training for and preparation for various aspects of Canadian GIM practice. After extensive piloting of the survey, including a pilot survey of two universities to improve the questionnaire, all graduates of the 16 universities over the previous ten years were surveyed.
Gaps (difference between importance and preparation) were demonstrated in many of the CanMEDS 2000/2005 competencies. Medical problems of pregnancy, perioperative care, pain management, chronic care, ambulatory care and community GIM rotations were the medical expert areas with the largest gaps. Exposure to procedural skills was perceived to be lacking. Some procedural skills valued as important for current GIM trainees and performed frequently (example ambulatory ECG interpretation) had low preparation ratings by trainees. Other areas of perceived discrepancy between training and practice included: manager role (set up of an office), health advocate (counseling for prevention, for example smoking cessation), and professional (end of life issues, ethics).
Graduates of Canadian GIM training programs over the last ten years have identified perceived gaps between training and important areas for practice. They have identified competencies that should be emphasized in Canadian GIM programs. Ongoing review of graduate's perceptions of training programs as it applies to their current practice is important to ensure ongoing appropriateness of training programs. This information will be used to strengthen GIM training programs in Canada.
Notes
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2000 Jun;15(6):353-6010886468
Cites: Med Educ. 2006 Jun;40(6):539-4616700769
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2000 Oct;15(10):716-2211089715
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Sep 5;286(9):1027-3411559286
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Nov 27;288(20):2609-1412444870
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2004 Jan;19(1):69-7714748863
Cites: Med Educ. 2004 Apr;38(4):340-815025635
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2004 Apr 20;140(8):639-4315096335
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1977 Jun 4;116(11):1269-73861884
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1978 Feb 18;118(4):397-400630500
Cites: JAMA. 1985 Jul 5;254(1):70-63999353
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1988 Apr;148(4):853-63355305
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1989 Jul-Aug;4(4):304-82760700
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1989 Dec 1;111(11):932-82817641
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1997 Apr;12 Suppl 2:S64-709127246
Cites: Med Educ. 1998 Sep;32(5):527-3210211297
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2000 Jun;15(6):361-510886469
PubMed ID
17112385 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are Canadian postgraduate training programs meeting the health advocacy needs of obstetrics and gynaecology residents?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108579
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Jun;35(6):539-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Julie Hakim
Amanda Black
Andrée Gruslin
Nathalie Fleming
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Newborn Care, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Jun;35(6):539-46
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Clinical Competence
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Medical, Graduate - standards
Female
Gynecology - education
Humans
Internship and Residency - standards
Male
Obstetrics - education
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Health advocacy (HA) is a core competency in Canadian obstetrics and gynaecology postgraduate programs. Our objectives were to assess awareness and understanding of the health advocate role among trainees, their current HA training and exposure, and the desire and needs for future HA training.
An anonymous, cross-sectional, Internet-based, self-reported health advocacy questionnaire was distributed to Canadian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees. Descriptive analysis was conducted for all study variables. Chi-square tests, Cochran-Armitage trend test, and Fisher exact test were performed where appropriate.
Most trainees (93.9% of respondents) were aware of the CanMEDS HA role and that it is a training objective (92.9%). Only 52.4% had clear objectives while 58.4% understood the role requirements. Most trainees (95.1% of respondents) felt HA was important to address during training. Only 30.4% had HA training, and just 36.3% felt their training needs were addressed. Training included teaching sessions (11.9%), clinical teaching (4.7%), and role modelling (4.7%). Although 82.9% of respondents had HA opportunities with patients, there were fewer opportunities at community (45.1%) and societal (30.0%) levels. Awareness of community groups and activities was low (28.6%), and few (20.0%) had participated in community advocacy programs during their residency. Incorporating advocacy activities into training was valued (80.0%). Many residents supported mandatory HA training (60.0%), more training time on HA experiences (66.3%), and HA experiences during protected time (71.3%).
Awareness of and interest in the HA role is high, but clear objectives and training are lacking or inadequate. A standardized curriculum would ensure health advocacy exposure and emphasize active participation in community and societal activities. Trainees support this training during protected time.
PubMed ID
23870779 View in PubMed
Less detail

At least 12 US states refuse to recognize physician training accredited in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205740
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Apr 21;158(8):1061-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-21-1998
Author
M. Korcok
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Apr 21;158(8):1061-3
Date
Apr-21-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - standards
Canada
Education, Medical
Education, Medical, Graduate - standards
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Licensure - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Physicians - supply & distribution
Population Dynamics
Specialization
United States
Abstract
The easing of trade rules has done little to ease the movement of physicians between Canada and the US. Borders may be breaking down when it comes to the transfer of goods, Milan Korcok reports, but for physicians the moats in front of those borders appear to be getting deeper and more difficult to cross.
PubMed ID
9580739 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian multidisciplinary core curriculum for musculoskeletal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165982
Source
J Rheumatol. 2007 Mar;34(3):567-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Veronica M R Wadey
En-Tzu Tang
Gregory Abelseth
Parvati Dev
Richard A Olshen
Decker Walker
Author Affiliation
Stanford University Medical Media Information and Technologies, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
Source
J Rheumatol. 2007 Mar;34(3):567-80
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Curriculum - standards
Data Collection
Education, Medical, Graduate - standards
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Physicians
Abstract
To determine the level of agreement among the Bone and Joint Decade Undergraduate Curriculum Group (BJDUCG) core curriculum recommendations for musculoskeletal (MSK) conditions targeted for undergraduate medical education and what the physicians and surgeons of Canada thought to be important at the postgraduate level of education.
An 80-item questionnaire was developed. A cross-sectional survey of educators representing 77 Canadian accredited academic programs representing 6 disciplines in medicine that manage patients with MSK conditions was completed. Histograms, Kruskal-Wallis, and principal component analyses were computed.
In total, 164/175 (94%) respondents participated in the study. All 80 curriculum items received a mean score of at least 3.0/4.0. Sixty-four out of 80 items were ranked to be at least 3.5/4.0, and 35 items were ranked to be at least 3.8/4.0, suggesting that these items may be core content for all disciplines.
The World Health Organization declared the years 2000 to 2010 as The Bone and Joint Decade. The main goal is to improve the quality of life for people with MSK disorders worldwide. One aim of the BJD is to increase education of healthcare providers at all levels. The BJDUCG established a set of core curriculum recommendations for MSK conditions. Our study gives reliable statistical evidence of agreement among what the BJDUCG recommended for an MSK core curriculum for medical schools and what the physicians and surgeons of Canada thought to be important for residency education in several disciplines.
Notes
Comment In: J Rheumatol. 2007 Mar;34(3):455-717343296
PubMed ID
17183615 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian ophthalmology residency training: an evaluation of resident satisfaction and comparison with international standards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148285
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2009 Oct;44(5):540-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Alysia W Zhou
Jason Noble
Wai-Ching Lam
Author Affiliation
Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2009 Oct;44(5):540-7
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Competency-Based Education
Curriculum - standards
Education, Medical, Graduate - standards
Educational Status
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Internationality
Internship and Residency - standards
Male
Ophthalmology - education
Professional Practice
Questionnaires
Teaching - standards
Abstract
To evaluate the adequacy of Canadian ophthalmology residency programs in achieving the competencies outlined by the International Council of Ophthalmology (ICO) and to assess residents' satisfaction with their training programs.
Canadian residents enrolled in the final 2 years of English and French ophthalmology programs, as well as recent graduates from 2005 to 2008.
Graduates and eligible residents were invited to participate in the 43-item survey during the autumn of 2008. Data were categorized by demographic variables, and basic statistics were done.
Of the 99 individuals surveyed, 40 (40%) responded, representing 26 current residents and 14 graduates. The vast majority (85%) of respondents were satisfied with their residency program. Clinic-based training was generally rated satisfactorily; however, respondents reported insufficient exposure to low-vision rehabilitation (77.5%), refraction and glasses prescription (65%), and neuro-ophthalmology (45%). Respondents were similarly satisfied with their surgical experiences, most of them (>60%) rating case volume, complexity, and variety as satisfactory or better. However, many stated that they had insufficient exposure to extracapsular cataract extraction (72.5%), refractive surgery (72.5%), and orbital surgery (57.5%). Of the graduates surveyed, all passed their Royal College licensing examinations on the first attempt and felt that residency adequately prepared them for the examinations. They reported insufficient training in certain nonclinical areas, such as practice management, and staffing and administration skills.
Canadian ophthalmology residents express high levels of satisfaction with their residency training programs. Although most programs appear to adequately address most ICO core objectives, certain curriculum modifications are required.
PubMed ID
19789589 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Clinical supervisors' perceptions concerning assessment of pre-registration house officers].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151149
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Apr 27;171(18):1505-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-27-2009
Author
Ann-Helen Henriksen
Charlotte Ringsted
Author Affiliation
Center for Klinisk Uddannelse, Rigshospitalet, DK-2100 København Ø. ann-helen.henriksen@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Apr 27;171(18):1505-8
Date
Apr-27-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Denmark
Education, Medical, Graduate - standards
Educational Measurement
Humans
Internship and Residency - standards
Medical Staff, Hospital - education - standards
Preceptorship
Questionnaires
Abstract
To improve postgraduate medical education, competence-based assessment has been introduced. This is a new approach in Denmark. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical teachers' perceptions of the current practice comprising a pre-registration house officers assessment logbook and their general attitudes towards assessment of the junior doctors.
Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 clinical teachers. Sampling was done in order to represent both medical and surgical departments and general practice departments. The interviews were recorded and transcribed. Data were analyzed using the encoding program Ethnograph version 5.0.
The assessment logbook was used as and considered a record of clinical experiences. The predominant method of assessment was indirect evidence of the trainee's performance rather than structured direct observation. Assessment was primarily based on a general impression encompassing issues of professionalism, rather than the 124 learning objectives stated in the logbook.
This study highlights perceptions about education that are historically and culturally rooted. When introducing new concepts, such as assessment, it is essential to ensure the supervisors' understanding of these concepts. Faculty development could be one step in the process of producing such understanding. However, changing historically and culturally rooted perceptions is a lengthy process.
PubMed ID
19419630 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical teaching and clinical outcomes: teaching capability and its association with patient outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168347
Source
Med Educ. 2006 Jul;40(7):637-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Ophyr Mourad
Donald A Redelmeier
Author Affiliation
St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mourado@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Med Educ. 2006 Jul;40(7):637-44
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Acquired Infections - therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Medical, Graduate - standards
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - therapy
Heart Failure - therapy
Humans
Internal Medicine - education
Length of Stay
Ontario
Pneumonia - therapy
Quality of Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Teaching - methods
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There is little research on the impact of medical education on patient outcome. We studied whether teaching capability is associated with altered short-term patient outcomes.
We performed a multicentre retrospective cross-sectional study involving 40 clinician teachers who had attended on the general internal medicine services in hospitals affiliated with the University of Toronto along with the clinical outcomes of consecutive patients treated for community-acquired pneumonia, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 4377) between 1999 and 2001. Doctors were characterised by teaching effectiveness scores (n = 677) as high-rated or low-rated according to house staff ratings.
There was no correlation between the teaching effectiveness scores and the mean length of stay for those patients treated for community-acquired pneumonia (high-rated = 10.3 versus low-rated = 8.1 days, P = 0.058), congestive heart failure (high-rated = 10.1 versus low-rated = 9.9 days, P = 0.978), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (high-rated = 9.4 versus low-rated = 9.9 days, P = 0.419) and gastrointestinal bleeding (high-rated = 6.3 versus low-rated = 6.8 days, P = 0.741). In addition, we observed no significant correlation between teaching effectiveness scores and 7-day, 28-day and 1-year readmission rates for all pre-specified diagnoses.
There is no large correlation between teaching effectiveness scores and short-term patient outcomes, suggesting that doctor teaching capabilities, as perceived by house staff, does not generally impact clinical care.
PubMed ID
16836536 View in PubMed
Less detail

67 records – page 1 of 7.