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[Basic course--only for advanced students?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274589
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2016 Feb 9;136(3):214
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-9-2016
Author
Stian Wendelborg
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2016 Feb 9;136(3):214
Date
Feb-9-2016
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Medical, Graduate - organization & administration
General Surgery - education
Humans
Norway
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2016 Mar 15;136(5):38226983130
PubMed ID
26860380 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Building specialist training in Ethiopia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271997
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Aug 11;135(14):1268-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-11-2015

The Canadian general surgery resident: defining current challenges for surgical leadership.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122037
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):S184-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Corey Tomlinson
Joseph Labossière
Kenton Rommens
Daniel W Birch
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):S184-90
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Career Choice
Clinical Competence
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Medical, Graduate - organization & administration
Female
General Surgery - education
Humans
Internship and Residency - organization & administration
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Male
Personal Satisfaction
Problem-Based Learning
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Abstract
Surgery training programs in Canada and the United States have recognized the need to modify current models of training and education. The shifting demographic of surgery trainees, lifestyle issues and an increased trend toward subspecialization are the major influences. To guide these important educational initiatives, a contemporary profile of Canadian general surgery residents and their impressions of training in Canada is required.
We developed and distributed a questionnaire to residents in each Canadian general surgery training program, and residents responded during dedicated teaching time.
In all, 186 surveys were returned for analysis (62% response rate). The average age of Canadian general surgery residents is 30 years, 38% are women, 41% are married, 18% have dependants younger than 18 years and 41% plan to add to or start a family during residency. Most (87%) residents plan to pursue postgraduate education. On completion of training, 74% of residents plan to stay in Canada and 49% want to practice in an academic setting. Almost half (42%) of residents identify a poor balance between work and personal life during residency. Forty-seven percent of respondents have appropriate access to mentorship, whereas 37% describe suitable access to career guidance and 40% identify the availability of appropriate social supports. Just over half (54%) believe the stress level during residency is manageable.
This survey provides a profile of contemporary Canadian general surgery residents. Important challenges within the residency system are identified. Program directors and chairs of surgery are encouraged to recognize these challenges and intervene where appropriate.
Notes
Cites: Am J Surg. 2000 Nov;180(5):353-611137686
Cites: Compr Psychiatry. 2011 Sep-Oct;52(5):542-721129737
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Cites: Harv Bus Rev. 2003 Jul;81(7):16-7, 11512858707
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2004 Jul;86-A(7):1579-8615252111
Cites: Am Surg. 1981 Jan;47(1):1-57469169
Cites: BMC Med Educ. 2005;5:2115972100
Cites: Semin Vasc Surg. 2006 Dec;19(4):210-317178325
Cites: Surg Clin North Am. 2007 Aug;87(4):811-23, v-vi17888781
Cites: Am J Surg. 2007 Nov;194(5):567-7517936416
Cites: J Am Coll Surg. 2008 May;206(5):782-8; discussion 788-918471695
Cites: BMC Fam Pract. 2009;10:1819239695
Cites: Arch Surg. 2009 Apr;144(4):371-619380652
Cites: Med Educ. 2009 Jul;43(7):628-3619573185
Cites: Niger J Clin Pract. 2010 Jun;13(2):183-620499753
Cites: Med Educ. 2010 Aug;44(8):826-3420633222
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:20820630091
Cites: Ann Surg. 2010 Sep;252(3):529-34; discussion 534-620739854
Cites: Adv Surg. 2010;44:29-4720919512
Cites: Surgery. 2001 Oct;130(4):696-702; discussion 702-511602901
PubMed ID
22854146 View in PubMed
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Canadian psychiatry residency training programs: A glance at the management structure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168736
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2006 May;51(6):377-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Louis T van Zyl
Paul R Davidson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario. vanzyl@post.queensu.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2006 May;51(6):377-81
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical, Graduate - organization & administration - trends
Efficiency, Organizational - trends
Forecasting
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration - trends
Humans
Internship and Residency - organization & administration - trends
Physician Executives - organization & administration - trends
Pilot Projects
Program Development - methods
Psychiatry - organization & administration - trends
Questionnaires
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To describe the administrative functioning of all current Canadian psychiatry residency training programs (RTPs) and to suggest available improvements to existing systems.
We obtained data about the 2004 RTPs by distributing 2 questionnaires to all Canadian psychiatry RTPs.
Residency program committees (RPCs) are mainly consultative and carry only a small amount of the workload of managing a residency program. Program directors (PDs) manage more than 80% of the work and report that the time allowance to perform their duties is suboptimal. PDs remain in office for about 5 years, departing during or at the end of a predetermined second term.
RPCs bear only a small amount of the workload generated by the RTP. We piloted administrative changes that led to more equitable work distribution.
PubMed ID
16786819 View in PubMed
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Challenges and opportunities in building a sustainable rural primary care workforce in alignment with the Affordable Care Act: the WWAMI program as a case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106695
Source
Acad Med. 2013 Dec;88(12):1862-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Suzanne M Allen
Ruth A Ballweg
Ellen M Cosgrove
Kellie A Engle
Lawrence R Robinson
Roger A Rosenblatt
Susan M Skillman
Marjorie D Wenrich
Author Affiliation
Dr. Allen is clinical professor of family medicine and vice dean for regional affairs, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. Ms. Ballweg is professor of family medicine and director, MEDEX Northwest Program, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. Dr. Cosgrove is professor of medicine and vice dean for academic affairs, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. Ms. Engle is director of operations, Office of Regional Affairs, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. Dr. Robinson is professor of rehabilitation medicine and vice dean for graduate medical education and clinical affairs, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. Dr. Rosenblatt is professor and vice chair of family medicine and director, Rural/Underserved Opportunities Program, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. Ms. Skillman is deputy director, WWAMI Rural Health Research Center and UW Center for Health Workforce Studies, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. Ms. Wenrich is affiliate assistant professor of biomedical informatics and medical education, University of Washington School of Medicine, and chief of staff, UW Medicine, Seattle, Washington.
Source
Acad Med. 2013 Dec;88(12):1862-9
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Education, Medical, Graduate - organization & administration
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
Humans
Northwestern United States
Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
Physician Assistants - education - statistics & numerical data - supply & distribution - trends
Physicians, Primary Care - education - statistics & numerical data - supply & distribution - trends
Primary Health Care - manpower - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Rural Health Services - manpower - organization & administration
United States
Abstract
The authors examine the potential impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) on a large medical education program in the Northwest United States that builds the primary care workforce for its largely rural region. The 42-year-old Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho (WWAMI) program, hosted by the University of Washington School of Medicine, is one of the nation's most successful models for rural health training. The program has expanded training and retention of primary care health professionals for the region through medical school education, graduate medical education, a physician assistant training program, and support for practicing health professionals.The ACA and resulting accountable care organizations (ACOs) present potential challenges for rural settings and health training programs like WWAMI that focus on building the health workforce for rural and underserved populations. As more Americans acquire health coverage, more health professionals will be needed, especially in primary care. Rural locations may face increased competition for these professionals. Medical schools are expanding their positions to meet the need, but limits on graduate medical education expansion may result in a bottleneck, with insufficient residency positions for graduating students. The development of ACOs may further challenge building a rural workforce by limiting training opportunities for health professionals because of competing demands and concerns about cost, efficiency, and safety associated with training. Medical education programs like WWAMI will need to increase efforts to train primary care physicians and increase their advocacy for student programs and additional graduate medical education for rural constituents.
PubMed ID
24128621 View in PubMed
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Combining a leadership course and multi-source feedback has no effect on leadership skills of leaders in postgraduate medical education. An intervention study with a control group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146755
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2009;9:72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Bente Malling
Lene Mortensen
Thomas Bonderup
Albert Scherpbier
Charlotte Ringsted
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Resources, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Aarhus, Denmark. mallingmail@dadlnet.dk
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2009;9:72
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Competency-Based Education - organization & administration
Consultants
Curriculum
Denmark
Education, Medical, Graduate - organization & administration
Educational Measurement
Faculty, Medical
Feedback
Female
Humans
Intervention Studies
Leadership
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Physician's Role
Probability
Program Evaluation
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Leadership courses and multi-source feedback are widely used developmental tools for leaders in health care. On this background we aimed to study the additional effect of a leadership course following a multi-source feedback procedure compared to multi-source feedback alone especially regarding development of leadership skills over time.
Study participants were consultants responsible for postgraduate medical education at clinical departments.
pre-post measures with an intervention and control group. The intervention was participation in a seven-day leadership course. Scores of multi-source feedback from the consultants responsible for education and respondents (heads of department, consultants and doctors in specialist training) were collected before and one year after the intervention and analysed using Mann-Whitney's U-test and Multivariate analysis of variances.
There were no differences in multi-source feedback scores at one year follow up compared to baseline measurements, either in the intervention or in the control group (p = 0.149).
The study indicates that a leadership course following a MSF procedure compared to MSF alone does not improve leadership skills of consultants responsible for education in clinical departments. Developing leadership skills takes time and the time frame of one year might have been too short to show improvement in leadership skills of consultants responsible for education. Further studies are needed to investigate if other combination of initiatives to develop leadership might have more impact in the clinical setting.
Notes
Cites: Arch Surg. 2005 Mar;140(3):258-6315781789
Cites: Am J Med. 2006 Jul;119(7):617-2116828636
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Sep 28;355(13):1339-4417005951
Cites: J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2007 Spring;27(2):94-10217576625
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2004 Jul;94(7):1245-915226150
Cites: Acad Med. 2007 Oct;82(10 Suppl):S77-8017895697
Cites: Med Educ. 2009 Feb;43(2):159-6719161487
Cites: Acad Med. 2003 Feb;78(2):142-912584092
Cites: Med Teach. 2007 Jun;29(5):471-717885975
PubMed ID
20003311 View in PubMed
Less detail

Consideration of adult critical care training for emergency physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202230
Source
Acad Emerg Med. 1999 Apr;6(4):345-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999

The current state and developments in higher education in gerontology in the nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125358
Source
Gerontol Geriatr Educ. 2012;33(2):218-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Heidi Hietanen
Tiina-Mari Lyyra
Terttu Parkatti
Eino Heikkinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences and Gerontology Research Centre, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. heidi.k.a.hietanen@jyu.fi
Source
Gerontol Geriatr Educ. 2012;33(2):218-31
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cooperative Behavior
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Graduate - organization & administration
Educational Measurement - methods
Finland
Geriatrics - education - methods - standards
Humans
Internationality
Needs Assessment
Population Dynamics
Quality Improvement
Questionnaires
Abstract
The growing size of the older population challenges not only researchers but also higher education in gerontology. On the basis of an online survey the authors describe the situation of Nordic higher education in gerontology in 2008 and 2009 and also give some good examples of Nordic- and European-level collaboration. The survey results showed that gerontological education was given in every Nordic country, in 31 universities and 60 other higher education institutions. Although separate aging-related courses and modules were relatively numerous, programs for majors were relatively few. Networking in the Nordic region offers a good example on how to further develop higher education in gerontology. Emphasis should be put on strengthening networking on the European and trans-Atlantic levels.
PubMed ID
22490076 View in PubMed
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69 records – page 1 of 7.