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157 records – page 1 of 16.

2009 Canadian Association of Gastroenterology educational needs assessment report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149186
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2009 Aug;23(8):560-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Alaa Rostom
Sandra Daniels
Author Affiliation
CAG Education Affairs.
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2009 Aug;23(8):560-7
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Curriculum
Data Collection
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Gastroenterology - education
Humans
Needs Assessment
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
19668802 View in PubMed
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Academic screencasting: internet-based dissemination of ophthalmology grand rounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137424
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2011 Feb;46(1):72-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Roshan Razik
Zaid Mammo
Harmeet S Gill
Wai-Ching Lam
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont, Canada.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2011 Feb;46(1):72-6
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Internet
Internship and Residency
Ontario
Ophthalmology - education
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Teaching - methods
Teaching Rounds - methods
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To evaluate and compare the preferences and attitudes of Ontario ophthalmologists and ophthalmology residents toward screencasting as an educational tool with potential use for continuing medical education (CME) events.
Cross-sectional study.
Eighty of 256 participants completed the survey.
The surveys were sent to participants by email, with follow-up via telephone. Study participants were urban and rural Ontario ophthalmologists, registered with the Canadian Ophthalmological Society, and University of Toronto ophthalmology residents. Pre-recorded online presentations-screencasts-were used as the main intervention. Online surveys were used to measure multiple variables evaluating the attitudes of the participants toward screencasting. This data was then used for further quantitative and qualitative analysis.
Over 95% of participants replied favourably to the introduction and future utilization of screencasting for educational purposes. Rural ophthalmologists were the most enthusiastic about future events. Practising in rural Ontario was associated with a higher interest in live broadcasts than practising in urban centres (p
PubMed ID
21283162 View in PubMed
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The ALARM course: 10 years of continuing professional development in intrapartum care and risk management in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167875
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2006 Jul;28(7):600-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006

The Alberta Ambassador Program: delivering Health Technology Assessment results to rural practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169962
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2006;6:21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Saifudin Rashiq
Pamela Barton
Christa Harstall
Donald Schopflocher
Paul Taenzer
Author Affiliation
Division of Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB, Canada. srashiq@ualberta.ca
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2006;6:21
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Chronic Disease
Decision Making
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Evidence-Based Medicine - education
Humans
Pain Management
Physician's Practice Patterns
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Regional Medical Programs
Rural Health Services - standards
Teaching - methods
Teaching Materials
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Abstract
The purpose of Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is to make the best possible summary of the evidence regarding specific health interventions in order to influence health care and policy decisions. The need for decision makers to find relevant HTA data when it is needed is a barrier to its usefulness. These barriers are highest in rural areas and amongst isolated practitioners.
A multidisciplinary team developed an interactive case-based instructional strategy on the topic of chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) management using clinical evidence derived by HTA. The evidence for each of 18 CNCP interventions was distilled into single-sheet summaries. Clinicians and HTA specialists ('Ambassadors') conducted 11 two-hour interactive sessions on CNCP in eight of Alberta's nine health regions. Pre- and post-session evaluations were conducted.
The sessions were attended by 130 individuals representing 14 health and administrative disciplines. The ambassador model was well received. The use of content experts as ambassadors was highly rated. The educational strategy was judged to be effective. Awareness of the best evidence in CNCP management was increased. Although some participants reported practice changes as a result of the workshops, the program was not designed to measure changes in patient outcome.
The ambassador program was successful in increasing awareness of the best evidence in CNCP management, and positively influenced treatment decisions. Its teaching methods were felt to be unique and innovative by participants. Its methods could be applied to other clinical content areas in order to increase the uptake of the results of HTA.
Notes
Cites: J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2002 Fall;22(4):214-2112613056
Cites: J Health Soc Policy. 2002;15(3-4):23-3712705462
Cites: BMJ. 1998 Jul 25;317(7153):273-69677226
Cites: J Eval Clin Pract. 2003 Nov;9(4):385-9014758960
Cites: J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2004 Spring;24(2):68-7515279131
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Oct 11;362(9391):1225-3014568747
PubMed ID
16579855 View in PubMed
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An education and training course in motivational interviewing influence: GPs' professional behaviour--ADDITION Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81927
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2006 Jun;56(527):429-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Rubak Sune
Sandbaek Annelli
Lauritzen Torsten
Borch-Johnsen Knut
Christensen Bo
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Skejby University, Vennelyst Boulevard 6, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. sr@alm.au.dk
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2006 Jun;56(527):429-36
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Diabetes mellitus, type 2 - therapy
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Family Practice - education
Humans
Interview, Psychological - methods - standards
Motivation
Physician's Practice Patterns
Physician-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Motivational interviewing has been shown to be broadly usable in a scientific setting in the management of behavioural problems and diseases. However, data concerning implementation and aspects regarding the use of motivational interviewing in general practice is missing. AIM:To evaluate GPs' conception of motivational interviewing in terms of methods, adherence to and aspects of its use in general practice after a course. STUDY DESIGN: In a randomised controlled trial concerning intensive treatment of newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes detected by screening, the GPs were randomised to a course in motivational interviewing or not. The study also included a third group of GPs outside the randomised controlled trial, who had 2 years previously received a similar course in motivational interviewing. SETTING: General practice in Denmark. METHOD: The intervention consisted of a 1.5-day residential course in motivational interviewing with 0.5-day follow-ups, twice during the first year. Questionnaire data from GPs were obtained. RESULTS: We obtained a 100% response-rate from the GPs in all three groups. The GPs trained in motivational interviewing adhered statistically significantly more to the methods than did the control group. More than 95% of the GPs receiving the course stated that they had used the specific methods in general practice. CONCLUSION: A course in motivational interviewing seems to influence GPs professional behaviour. Based on self-reported questionnaires, this study shows that the GPs after a course in motivational interviewing seemed to change their professional behaviour in daily practice using motivational interviewing compared with the control group. GPs evaluated motivational interviewing to be more effective than 'traditional advice giving'. Furthermore, GPs stated that the method was not more time consuming than 'traditional advice giving'.
Notes
Comment In: Fam Med. 2007 Mar;39(3):21517323217
PubMed ID
16762124 View in PubMed
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An interprofessional approach to teaching communication skills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128569
Source
J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2011;31(4):265-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Joan Sargeant
Tanya MacLeod
Anne Murray
Author Affiliation
Director Research and Evaluation, Continuing Medical Education, Division of Medical Education, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4H7. Joan.Sargeant@Dal.ca
Source
J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2011;31(4):265-7
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence - standards
Communication
Conflict (Psychology)
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods - organization & administration
Evidence-Based Practice
Health Personnel - classification - education - standards
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Needs Assessment
Nova Scotia
Organizational Innovation
Professional-Family Relations
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Social Facilitation
Abstract
Recent research suggests that effective interprofessional communication and collaboration can positively influence patient satisfaction and outcomes. Health professional communication skills do not necessarily improve over time but can improve with formal communication skills training (CST). This article describes the development, evaluation, and lessons learned for a novel theater-based role-play CST program designed to improve community cancer care for patients and families by enhancing health care professionals' communication skills.
Four 2-hour interprofessional communication skills workshops for Nova Scotia health professionals were developed. Topics were (1) Essential Communication Skills, (2) Delivering Difficult News and Providing Support, (3) When Patients and Families Are Angry, and (4) Managing Conflict in the Workplace. Strategies for enhancing communication skills based on the science (evidence-based practice and teaching) and the art (interactive theater) of communication skills were included. Facilitators included professional actors, communication skills facilitators, and trained health professionals.
We used a mixed-methods evaluation design assessing 4 levels of educational outcomes at 3 points: pre- and post-workshop and follow-up.
Five hundred eighteen professionals representing over 20 health professions attended 17 workshops. Data showed the workshops were well received, despite some discomfort with role-playing. Pre/post paired t-tests of self-reported communication skills showed significant improvement after all workshops (p = 0.05); 92% indicated intended changes to their communication practice immediately following the workshops. Of 68 respondents to the follow-up, 59 (87%) reported positive changes in the responses of their patients.
Both positive and negative lessons learned are described.
PubMed ID
22189990 View in PubMed
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An investigation of factors influencing healthcare workers' use and acceptance of e-learning in post-school healthcare education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148615
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2009;150:893-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Marius Mikalsen
Ståle Walderhaug
Author Affiliation
SINTEF Information and Communication Technology, Trondheim, Norway. Marius.Mikalsen@sintef.no
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2009;150:893-7
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Data Collection
Diffusion of Innovation
Education, Distance
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Health Personnel - education
Humans
Norway
Nurses
Abstract
The objective of the study presented here was to perform an empirical investigation on factors affecting healthcare workers acceptance and utilisation of e-learning in post-school healthcare education. E-learning benefits are realised when key features of e-learning are not only applied, but deemed useful, compatible with the learning process and supportive in order to reach the overall goals of the learning process. We conducted a survey of 14 state-enrolled nurses and skilled-workers within the field of healthcare in Norway. The results show that perceived compatibility and subjective norm explain system usage of the e-learning tool amongst the students. We found that the fact that the students considered the e-learning to be compatible with the course in question had a positive effect on e-learning tool usage. We also found support for factors such as facilitating conditions and ease of use leads to the e-learning tool being considered useful.
PubMed ID
19745441 View in PubMed
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An investigation of videoconferenced geriatric medicine grand rounds in Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180710
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2004;10(2):104-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Keith Sclater
Kannayiram Alagiakrishnan
Anne Sclater
Author Affiliation
Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2004;10(2):104-7
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Dementia - therapy
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods - standards
Geriatrics - education
Humans
Questionnaires
Rural Health
Telemedicine - standards
Urban health
Abstract
Geriatric medicine grand rounds (GMGR) from the University of Alberta are videoconferenced weekly to health-care providers at up to 9 urban and 14 rural sites across Alberta. A questionnaire was given to all participants attending 20 consecutive GMGR presentations from January 2002. The response rate was 85% (n = 625) for all participants and 99% (n = 123) for physicians alone. The audience was composed of registered nurses (42%), physicians (17%) and other health-care professionals. 'Interest in topic' was cited by 95% as the main reason for attendance. Doctors and nurses cited continuing medical education as an additional factor. The highest attendance was for the topics vascular dementia, behavioural problems in dementia, the genetics of dementia and falls prevention. Participants at the remote sites gave lower evaluations of quality of the GMGR presentations than those at the hub site. The measurement, care and treatment of dementia appeared to be the main concerns of health-care providers across the province. The videoconferencing of GMGR appears to be an effective method of meeting the demands of physicians and allied health professionals for education in geriatric medicine.
PubMed ID
15068647 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic handbook and pre-printed perioperative order forms for surgical antibiotic prophylaxis: do they work?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228303
Source
Can J Surg. 1990 Oct;33(5):385-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1990
Author
M J Girotti
S. Fodoruk
J. Irvine-Meek
O D Rotstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Toronto Hospital Corporation, University of Toronto, Ont.
Source
Can J Surg. 1990 Oct;33(5):385-8
Date
Oct-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Drug Prescriptions - standards
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Humans
Premedication - standards
Abstract
The authors attempted to compare the value of two strategies--an educational (antibiotic handbook) and a control (perioperative pre-printed physician order form, which contained antibiotic orders)--in modifying physicians' patterns of antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing infection in patients who undergo elective surgery. They reviewed the charts of 240 such patients on five different surgical services in one teaching hospital. Use of the antibiotic handbook (educational strategy) increased overall compliance with the recommended regimens from 11% to 18% (p = 0.06). The control strategy (perioperative pre-printed physician order form) increased compliance from 17% to 78% (p less than 0.01).
PubMed ID
2224658 View in PubMed
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THE APPLICATION OF IMPROVED, STRUCTURED AND INTERACTIVE GROUP LEARNING METHODS IN DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281230
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2016 Jun;169(1-4):416-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Jonas Ivarsson
Hans Rystedt
Sara Asplund
Åse Allansdotter Johnsson
Magnus Båth
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2016 Jun;169(1-4):416-21
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Diagnostic Imaging
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Educational Measurement
Models, Educational
Radiology - education
Simulation Training - methods
Sweden
Teaching
Abstract
This study provides an example on how it is possible to design environments in a diagnostic radiology department that could meet learning demands implied by the introduction of new imaging technologies. The innovative aspect of the design does not result from the implementation of any specific tool for learning. Instead, advancement is achieved by a novel set-up of existing technologies and an interactive format that allows for focussed discussions between learners with different levels of expertise. Consequently, the study points to what is seen as the underexplored possibilities of tailoring basic and specialist training that meet the new demands given by leading-edge technologies.
PubMed ID
26675144 View in PubMed
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157 records – page 1 of 16.