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Comparison of veterinary medical degree enrollment for academic years 1993-1994 and 1994-1995.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214085
Source
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1995 Oct 15;207(8):1036-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-1995

Culturally tailored postsecondary nutrition and health education curricula for indigenous populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107884
Source
Pages 781-786 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):781-786
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Sarah McConnell
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska, Anchorage, Alaska, USA
Source
Pages 781-786 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):781-786
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Cultural Competency
Diet - ethnology
Education, Graduate - statistics & numerical data
Health education
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Inuits
Nutritional Sciences
Abstract
In preparation for the initial offering of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), Interior-Aleutians Campus Rural Nutrition Services (RNS) program, a literature review was conducted to establish the need for the proposed program and to substantiate the methodology for delivering integrated, culturally tailored postsecondary education and extension to Alaska Natives and rural Alaskans. There was a striking absence of peer-reviewed journal articles describing culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula for indigenous populations.
To complete and discuss a current (November 2012) literature review for culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula designed and delivered for indigenous populations.
The author conducted an expanded online search that employed multiple configurations of key terms using Google and Google Scholar, as well as pertinent sources. The author located archived reports in person and contacted authors by email.
The expanded search produced a modest amount of additional literature for review. A disappointing number of publications describing or evaluating culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula in mainstream institutions are available. Related resources on culturally tailored extension and resources for the development and delivery of culturally tailored nutrition and health curricula were identified.
The present results demonstrate a significant absence of literature on the topic, which may or may not indicate the absence of sufficient culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula for indigenous populations. There are indications that culturally tailored postsecondary health curricula for indigenous populations have the potential to effectively address certain issues of health literacy and health disparities.
Notes
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2006 Mar-Apr;38(2):114-2016595290
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2012 Jan-Feb;44(1):55-921782521
Cites: Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:1322416784
PubMed ID
23967420 View in PubMed
Documents
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Enrollment in veterinary medical colleges, 1995-1996 and 1996-1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207296
Source
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1997 Nov 15;211(10):1240-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1997

Evaluation of the medical student research programme in Norwegian medical schools. A survey of students and supervisors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149680
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2009;9:43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Steinar Hunskaar
Jarle Breivik
Maje Siebke
Karin Tømmerås
Kristian Figenschau
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. steinar.hunskar@isf.uib.no
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2009;9:43
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - statistics & numerical data
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Biomedical research
Career Choice
Career Mobility
Data Collection
Education, Graduate - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Humans
Motivation
Norway
Personnel Selection
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Students, Medical
Abstract
The Medical Student Research Programme is a national education and grant scheme for medical students who wish to carry out research in parallel with their studies. The purpose of the programme is to increase recruitment of people with a standard medical degree to medical research. The Research Programme was established in 2002 and underwent a thorough evaluation during the spring of 2007. The evaluation should investigate if the programme had fulfilled its objectives of increased recruitment to medical research, in addition to the students' and supervisors' satisfaction of the programme, and unwanted differences between the universities.
Data was collected from students, supervisors and administrative staff via web-based questionnaires. Information about admission, implementation, results achieved and satisfaction was analysed and compared between the four Norwegian medical schools. In addition, the position of the scheme in relation to the national Quality Reform of Higher Education was analysed.
At the end of 2006, the Medical Student Research Programme had recruited 265 medical students to research. These consisted of 214 active students, 35 who had completed their studies and only 17 who had dropped out. Both students and supervisors were generally very satisfied with the scheme, including the curriculum, the results achieved and the administrative service. The majority of students wanted to continue their research towards a PhD and, of those who had completed the Medical Student Research Programme, practically all had published one or several scientific papers. The survey showed only small differences between the four medical schools, despite their choice of somewhat different solutions in terms of administration and organisation. The Medical Student Research Programme satisfies the majority of the demands of the Quality Reform, however as an integrated research programme aimed at a PhD it presupposes access to PhD courses before the completion of medical studies, as well as the ability to include undergraduate scientific work in a PhD thesis.
The Medical Student Research Programme has led to an increase in the recruitment of graduated physicians to medical research in Norway. It will only be possible to evaluate whether this in turn will result in a larger number of PhDs in 3-5 years; this will also depend on the access to grants and fellowships.
Notes
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Apr 20;121(10):1281-211402762
Cites: BMJ. 2007 Jun 16;334(7606):1246-817569927
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Oct 30;118(26):4111-49844518
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jun 10;121(15):1846-711464704
PubMed ID
19602226 View in PubMed
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Prediction of graduate dietetic internship appointments in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224358
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1991;52(2):89-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
G M Beazley
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1991;52(2):89-93
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection
Dietetics - education - manpower
Discriminant Analysis
Education, Graduate - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internship, Nonmedical - statistics & numerical data
Models, Statistical
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
School Admission Criteria - statistics & numerical data
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
A statistical model of dietetic intern selection was developed from a profile of selection criteria that was obtained in a 1988 survey of Canadian graduate dietetic internship directors. The model was composed of four clusters of variables that resulted from the most frequently used selection criteria: academic performance, work experience, communication skills, and extracurricular activities. Data from a convenience sample of 39 dietetic intern applicants were analyzed, using principal components analysis and discriminant analysis, to test the model's power to predict success in obtaining an internship appointment. In descending order, the criteria with the greatest predictive powers were: academic performance; extracurricular activities; and supervisory, teaching, or instructing types of work experience. The model accounted for 41% of the differences between those who were successful and those who were not successful in obtaining internship appointments in 1989 and correctly classified 30 of 39 subjects. These results provide baseline data on the predictive power of some criteria used for selecting dietetic interns. These findings suggest the need for a replication study with a randomized national sample to crossvalidate the results obtained in this exploratory research.
PubMed ID
10111390 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.