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A 2-year community-randomized controlled trial of fluoride varnish to prevent early childhood caries in Aboriginal children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157658
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2008 Dec;36(6):503-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Herenia P Lawrence
Darlene Binguis
Jan Douglas
Lynda McKeown
Bonita Switzer
Rafael Figueiredo
Audrey Laporte
Author Affiliation
Community Dentistry Discipline, Department of Biological and Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. herenia.lawrence@utoronto.ca
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2008 Dec;36(6):503-16
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caregivers - education
Cariostatic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Fluorides, Topical - therapeutic use
Health Education, Dental
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sodium Fluoride - administration & dosage
Tooth, Deciduous
Abstract
To measure the effectiveness of fluoride varnish (FV) (Duraflor), 5% sodium fluoride, Pharmascience Inc., Montréal, QC, Canada) and caregiver counseling in preventing early childhood caries (ECC) in Aboriginal children in a 2-year community-randomized controlled trial.
Twenty First Nations communities in the Sioux Lookout Zone (SLZ), Northwest Ontario, Canada were randomized to two study groups. All caregivers received oral health counseling, while children in one group received FV twice per year and the controls received no varnish. A total of 1275, 6 months to 5-year-old children from the SLZ communities were enrolled. In addition, a convenience sample of 150 primarily non-Aboriginal children of the same age were recruited from the neighboring community of Thunder Bay and used as comparisons. Longitudinal examinations for the dmft/s indices were conducted by calibrated hygienists in 2003, 2004 and 2005.
Aboriginal children living in the SLZ or in Thunder Bay had significantly higher caries prevalence and severity than non-Aboriginal children in Thunder Bay. FV treatment conferred an 18% reduction in the 2-year mean 'net' dmfs increment for Aboriginal children and a 25% reduction for all children, using cluster analysis to adjust for the intra-cluster correlation among children in the same community. Adjusted odds ratio for caries incidence was 1.96 times higher in the controls than in the FV group (95% CI = 1.08-3.56; P = 0.027). For those caries-free at baseline, the number (of children) needed to treat (NNT) equaled 7.4.
Findings support the use of FV at least twice per year, in conjunction with caregiver counseling, to prevent ECC, reduce caries increment and oral health inequalities between young Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children.
PubMed ID
18422711 View in PubMed
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A 5-year retrospective analysis of employer-provided dental care for Finnish male industrial workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206874
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J. Ahlberg
R. Tuominen
H. Murtomaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. jari.ahlberg@helsinki.fi
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Dental Association
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Prophylaxis
Dental Records
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentures
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Finland - epidemiology
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Patient Education as Topic
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Root Canal Therapy
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
The treatment-mix, treatment time, and dental status of 268 male industrial workers entitled to employer-provided dental care were studied. The data were collected from treatment records of the covered workers over the 5-year period 1989-93. Treatment time was based on clinical treatment time recorded per patient visit, and the treatment procedure codes were reclassified into a treatment-mix according to American Dental Association categories, with a modification combining endodontics and restorative treatment. The mean number of check-ups followed by prescribed treatment (treatment courses) during the 5 years was 3.7 among those who had entered the in-house dental care program prior to the monitored period (old attenders). Their treatment time was stable, 57-63 min per year, while the first-year mean treatment time (170 min) of those who had entered the program during the study period (new attenders) was significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
9429814 View in PubMed
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25-year analysis of a dental undergraduate research training program (BSc Dent) at the University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154080
Source
J Dent Res. 2008 Dec;87(12):1085-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
J E Scott
J. de Vries
A M Iacopino
Author Affiliation
Oral Biology, University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
J Dent Res. 2008 Dec;87(12):1085-8
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aptitude Tests
Career Choice
Cohort Studies
Curriculum
Decision Making
Dental Research - education - trends
Education, Dental - trends
Education, Dental, Graduate - trends
Educational Measurement
Evidence-Based Dentistry - education
Faculty, Dental
Humans
Manitoba
Program Development
Schools, Dental - trends
Students, Dental
Abstract
Research in the context of the dental school has traditionally been focused on institutional/faculty accomplishments and generating new knowledge to benefit the profession. Only recently have significant efforts been made to expand the overall research programming into the formal dental curriculum, to provide students with a baseline exposure to the research and critical thinking processes, encourage evidence-based decision-making, and stimulate interest in academic/research careers. Various approaches to curriculum reform and the establishment of multiple levels of student research opportunities are now part of the educational fabric of many dental schools worldwide. Many of the preliminary reports regarding the success and vitality of these programs have used outcomes measures and metrics that emphasize cultural changes within institutions, student research productivity, and student career preferences after graduation. However, there have not been any reports from long-standing programs (a minimum of 25 years of cumulative data) that describe dental school graduates who have had the benefit of research/training experiences during their dental education. The University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry initiated a BSc Dent program in 1980 that awarded a formal degree for significant research experiences taking place within the laboratories of the Faculty-based researchers and has continued to develop and expand this program. The success of the program has been demonstrated by the continued and increasing demands for entry, the academic achievements of the graduates, and the numbers of graduates who have completed advanced education/training programs or returned to the Faculty as instructors. Analysis of our long-term data validates many recent hypotheses and short-term observations regarding the benefits of dental student research programs. This information may be useful in the design and implementation of dental student research programs at other dental schools.
PubMed ID
19029073 View in PubMed
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44-year dental health survey of Helsinki schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246141
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1980 Feb;8(1):66-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1980
Author
I. Rytömaa
V. Järvinen
P E Calonius
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1980 Feb;8(1):66-7
Date
Feb-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
DMF Index
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Dental Health Surveys
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Sucrose - administration & dosage
War
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to establish whether the number of intact teeth in Helsinki schoolchildren aged 7-13 years was rationally correlated with the wartime reduction in sugar consumption and, later, with dental health education programs in Finland. The period covered is 44 years. The results show that dental health education is effective in caries prevention and that enforced programs can lead to an improvement similar to that seen during the war.
PubMed ID
6929245 View in PubMed
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Academic dissertations by dentists in Finland, 1891-1991, and in Finland, Norway, and Sweden, 1984-93.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211755
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1996 Jun;54(3):182-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
M. Vehkalahti
E. Kihlberg
I. Rytömaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1996 Jun;54(3):182-7
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Dentists - history - statistics & numerical data
Dentists, Women - history - statistics & numerical data
Dissertations, Academic as Topic - history
Education, Dental, Graduate - history - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Norway
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Dental education in the Nordic countries was founded in the late 1800s, but the doctor's degree in dentistry (Ph.D.) was established somewhat later. Since the first dissertation in Finland in 1891, a total of 204 doctoral dentist candidates had defended their Ph.D. theses by 1991, 50% of them during the most recent 12 years. Over the 100-year period, 54% of the dentists' Ph.D. theses in Finland were defended at the University of Helsinki, 27% at Turku, 14% at Kuopio, and 5% at Oulu. Women constituted a minority of the candidates (23%) during the first 90 years but 54% from 1982 to 1991. From 1984 to 1993 a total of 374 dentist candidates in Finland, Norway, and Sweden defended their Ph.D. theses. The mean ages of the candidates ranged from 37.7 to 41.7 years for men and from 40.6 to 43.2 years for women. In the 10-year period on average 53 doctor's degrees were received per institute in Sweden, compared with 28 in Finland and 27 in Norway. In all three countries about 6 of 100 graduates in 1980s received a doctor's degree in dentistry. Almost all of these Ph.D. theses were written in English and based on collections of articles. Female candidates dominated in Finland (56%), compared with 34% in Sweden and 26% in Norway, where, however, women's contribution increased most rapidly, being tripled from early 1980s to 1990s.
PubMed ID
8811141 View in PubMed
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[Academic, scientific and practical cooperation as an efficient form of work to introduce the comprehensive prevention of stomatological diseases in children in rural localities].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234266
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 1988 Jan-Feb;67(1):87-8
Publication Type
Article

Access and care: reports from Canadian dental education and care agencies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173771
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2005 Jul-Aug;71(7):469-71
Publication Type
Article
Author
James L Leake
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario. james.leake@utoronto.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2005 Jul-Aug;71(7):469-71
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Dental Care for Aged - organization & administration
Dental Clinics - economics
Dental Health Services - economics - utilization
Education, Dental - economics
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Indians, North American
Poverty
Abstract
Representatives of faculties of dentistry and agencies working to improve the oral health of groups with restricted access to dental care were invited to address the access and care symposium held in Toronto in May 2004. They told of their clients" sometimes desperate needs in graphic terms. The agencies" response ranged from simple documentation of the need, to expression of frustration with current trends and the apparent indifference of policy makers, to the achievement of some success in arranging alternative models of care. The presenters consistently identified the need to change methods of financing dental education and both the financing and models of care delivery to meet the needs of those with restricted access to oral health care.
PubMed ID
16026632 View in PubMed
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Access to care for seniors -- dental concerns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192958
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2001 Oct;67(9):504-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
M F Marvin
Author Affiliation
Geriatric Dental Program for the North Bay and District Dental Society.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2001 Oct;67(9):504-6
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Canada
Dental Care for Aged - economics - psychology - utilization
Financing, Government
Health Education, Dental
Health Services Accessibility
Health Transition
Humans
Ontario
Societies, Dental
PubMed ID
11597341 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of dental registrations in forensic odontology among dentists and dental students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218003
Source
J Forensic Odontostomatol. 1994 Jun;12(1):12-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
L P Sand
L G Rasmusson
H. Borrman
Author Affiliation
Goteborg University, Faculty of Odontology, Sweden.
Source
J Forensic Odontostomatol. 1994 Jun;12(1):12-4
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Dental Records
Dentists
Education, Dental
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Forensic Dentistry - methods
Humans
Observer Variation
Reproducibility of Results
Students, Dental
Sweden
Abstract
In forensic odontology, registration of dental characteristics is crucial in the identification procedure. It has been found that the most common errors made are incorrect registration of restorations and confusion about premolars and molars in both jaws. In an earlier study, dental students were observers and the charting was made without radiographs. However, in practical forensic work dentists make the registrations and radiographs are usually available. In this investigation eight dental students and eight dentists made registrations on ten excised macerated jaws with the aid of radiographs. The mean number of errors for each jaw for the students and the dentist was 4 and 3 respectively. The most common error among the dentists was incorrect registration of restorations, while errors on registrations of missing teeth were most common among the students. Even though the material in this study was limited, the results indicate the importance of re-examining of postmortem findings before the comparison with the antemortem data is done. Additionally, the forensic work should be performed by specialists.
PubMed ID
9227084 View in PubMed
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682 records – page 1 of 69.