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167 records – page 1 of 17.

Acute emergency service in Reykjavik]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55044
Source
Nord Med. 1993;108(3):88-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
G. Thorgeirsson
Author Affiliation
Medicinska avdelningen, Borgarspítalinn, Reykjavik.
Source
Nord Med. 1993;108(3):88-9
Date
1993
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Education, Continuing
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - organization & administration
Emergency Medical Technicians - education
English Abstract
Female
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Iceland
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
The cardiac arrest survival rate has improved since the emergency ambulance service manned by specially trained paramedical personnel and doctors was introduced in Iceland. As the response time has been reduced, specific resuscitation measures can be applied sooner.
PubMed ID
8455979 View in PubMed
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Adapting online learning for Canada's Northern public health workforce.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284321
Source
Pages 895-901 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):895-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Bell M
MacDougall K.
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Centre for Public Health Capacity Development, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Source
Pages 895-901 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):895-901
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Canada
Education, Continuing/organization & administration
Education, Distance/organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel/education
Humans
Internet
Professional Competence
Public Health Administration
Documents
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Administrators of volunteer services: their needs for training and research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221883
Source
Nonprofit Manag Leadersh. 1992;2(3):271-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
J L Brudney
Author Affiliation
University of Georgia.
Source
Nonprofit Manag Leadersh. 1992;2(3):271-82
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - education - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Education, Continuing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Organizations, Nonprofit - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Research
United States
Volunteers - organization & administration
Abstract
Despite the importance of volunteer administrators to nonprofit and many government organizations, little systematic research has been focused on these officials. Using a large national survey of volunteer practitioners conducted in 1989-1990, this article examines empirically several hypotheses concerning organizational support to meet administrator needs for continuing education. Using the survey responses, the article also elaborates the subjects recommended by the administrators for treatment in a basic seminar in volunteer management, in an advanced seminar, and in further research.
PubMed ID
10117915 View in PubMed
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Allergy trainees' perspectives on career opportunities: results from a trainee-organized retreat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275065
Source
Allergy. 2015 Nov;70(11):1353-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015

An interactive educational workshop to improve end of life communication skills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153875
Source
J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2008;28(4):241-8; quiz 249-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Brigette M Hales
Laura Hawryluck
Author Affiliation
Critical Care Secretariat, Ministry of Health and Long Term Care, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. brigette.hales@sunnybrook.ca
Source
J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2008;28(4):241-8; quiz 249-55
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making - ethics
Education - methods
Education, Continuing
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Interdisciplinary Communication
Ontario
Professional-Family Relations - ethics
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Terminal Care - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
An understanding of legal, ethical, and cultural concerns and an ability to communicate when faced with clinical dilemmas are integral to the end of life decision-making process. Yet teaching practicing clinicians these important skills in addressing conflict situations is not strongly emphasized.
A one-day interactive continuing education workshop was designed to improve interactions among multiprofessional intensive care unit (ICU) clinicians, their colleagues, and families in a range of end of life situations using standardized families and colleagues (SF/SCs). Workshop participants completed preworkshop and postworkshop evaluations. Data were analyzed using the McNemar test for paired categorical data to evaluate changes in comfort, knowledge, and skill.
The majority of evaluation respondents were nursing professionals, while only one physician (of two in attendance) responded. Statistically significant improvement was seen in all comfort levels, except when approaching cultural differences. Expectations were exceeded according to 76.2% of responses, while 82.4% rated SF/SCs "excellent" for improving communication skills and comfort levels with ethical and legal dilemmas. Peer discussions were highly valued in meeting educational objectives (95.2% good or excellent), and 95.2% rated achievement of personal learning objectives good or excellent. Qualitative data supported a high overall perception of success and achievement of educational objectives.
An interactive workshop can be a valuable educational intervention for building capacity and confidence in end of life communication skills and ethical and legal knowledge for health care providers; further physician involvement is required to extrapolate results to this population.
PubMed ID
19058258 View in PubMed
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Assessing the continuing education needs of long-term care administrators in Ontario: results of a survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224157
Source
J Health Adm Educ. 1991;9(4):483-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
A P Williams
Author Affiliation
School of Public Administration, Ryerson Polytechnical Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Health Adm Educ. 1991;9(4):483-501
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Education, Continuing - statistics & numerical data
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Goals
Health Facility Administrators - education - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Administration - education
Humans
Long-Term Care - manpower - organization & administration
Ontario
Professional Competence - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Residential Facilities - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Self-Assessment
Abstract
This article reports the results of a 1989 survey of the professional characteristics and educational needs of 429 managers and supervisors in long-term care institutions and community-based service agencies in greater metropolitan Toronto. The data identify important gaps in the professional training of these administrators: while two-thirds report attainment of postsecondary education credentials, the remaining third, including a quarter of senior managers, have no formal college or university training. Moreover, of those with postsecondary credentials, only a minority are trained in health or human services and administration--skills and knowledge areas key to establishing and managing a client-centered continuum of long-term care. The data also demonstrate that there is widespread support in principle and practice among current administrators in the Toronto region for programs of education which address the particular challenges of long-term care administration, and that specific credentials in the field are seen as a future requirement for promotion to management positions. Preferred modes of education program delivery are short, intensive seminars and night classes.
PubMed ID
10117524 View in PubMed
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Barriers to implementation of stroke rehabilitation evidence: findings from a multi-site pilot project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124055
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(19):1633-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Mark T Bayley
Amanda Hurdowar
Carol L Richards
Nicol Korner-Bitensky
Sharon Wood-Dauphinee
Janice J Eng
Marilyn McKay-Lyons
Edward Harrison
Robert Teasell
Margaret Harrison
Ian D Graham
Author Affiliation
Neuro Rehabilitation Program, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. Bayley.Mark@torontorehab.on.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(19):1633-8
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Communication
Education, Continuing
Evidence-Based Medicine
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - education
Humans
Pilot Projects
Professional Competence
Qualitative Research
Rehabilitation Centers - organization & administration
Stroke - rehabilitation
Translational Medical Research
Abstract
To describe the barriers to implementation of evidence-based recommendations (EBRs) for stroke rehabilitation experienced by nurses, occupational therapists, physical therapists, physicians and hospital managers.
The Stroke Canada Optimization of Rehabilitation by Evidence project developed EBRs for arm and leg rehabilitation after stroke. Five Canadian stroke inpatient rehabilitation centers participated in a pilot implementation study. At each site, a clinician was identified as the "local facilitator" to promote the 6-month implementation. A research coordinator observed the process. Focus groups done at completion were analyzed thematically for barriers by two raters.
A total of 79 rehabilitation professionals (23 occupational therapists, 17 physical therapists, 23 nurses and 16 directors/managers) participated in 21 focus groups of three to six participants each. The most commonly noted barrier to implementation was lack of time followed by staffing issues, training/education, therapy selection and prioritization, equipment availability and team functioning/communication. There was variation in perceptions of barriers across stakeholders. Nurses noted more training and staffing issues and managers perceived fewer barriers than frontline clinicians.
Rehabilitation guideline developers should prioritize evidence for implementation and employ user-friendly language. Guideline implementation strategies must be extremely time efficient. Organizational approaches may be required to overcome the barriers. [Box: see text].
PubMed ID
22631218 View in PubMed
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[Benefits with well-educated medical secretaries. Improved coding in the patient registry following a course in classification and care documentation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174207
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 May 16-22;102(20):1530, 1533-4, 1536-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lisbeth Serdén
Rikard Lindqvist
Måns Rosén
Author Affiliation
Centrum för patientklassificering, Socialstyrelsen, Stockholm lisbeth.serden@socialstyrelsen.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 May 16-22;102(20):1530, 1533-4, 1536-7
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diagnosis-Related Groups - classification
Documentation - standards
Education, Continuing
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - standards
Medical Secretaries - education
Quality Control
Registries - standards
Sweden
PubMed ID
15973879 View in PubMed
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167 records – page 1 of 17.