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1191 records – page 1 of 120.

Staying the course: the Captain's Log continues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168600
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97 Suppl 2:S5-9
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Author
Irving Rootman
Deborah Gordon El-Bihbety
Author Affiliation
Centre for Community Health Promotion Research, University of Victoria, Box 3060 STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3R4. irootman@uvic.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97 Suppl 2:S5-9
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Canada
Cultural Diversity
Educational Status
Ethnic Groups - education
Health Education - trends
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Priorities
Humans
Public Health - education
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This paper introduces the reader to the context for the papers in this journal supplement by describing the background and task assigned to the authors, a short history of the development of the field of literacy and health in Canada, some recent developments and opportunities, some information on the nature and magnitude of the issue, and an overview of the supplement. The publication results from the Second Canadian Conference on Literacy and Health. Authors were asked to summarize what was learned at the conference, what we need to know, and what we need to do to move the field forward in relation to the themes of the conference. The four themes were: Building Best Practices in Literacy and Health; Focusing on Language and Culture; Building Knowledge in Literacy and Health; and Building Healthy Public Policy.
PubMed ID
16805153 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Experience with conducting a seminar for the students on the subject "Socio-biological aspects of the definition of health and disease"].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227181
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1991;(8):55-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991

Community health clinical education in Canada: part 2--developing competencies to address social justice, equity, and the social determinants of health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152591
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2009;6:Article2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Benita E Cohen
David Gregory
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba. benita cohen@umanitoba.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2009;6:Article2
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Nursing - education
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - methods
Educational Measurement
Female
Focus Groups
Health Education - methods
Humans
Male
Nurse's Role
Professional Competence
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Social Justice
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Recently, several Canadian professional nursing associations have highlighted the expectations that community health nurses (CHNs) should address the social determinants of health and promote social justice and equity. These developments have important implications for (pre-licensure) CHN clinical education. This article reports the findings of a qualitative descriptive study that explored how baccalaureate nursing programs in Canada address the development of competencies related to social justice, equity, and the social determinants of health in their community health clinical courses. Focus group interviews were held with community health clinical course leaders in selected Canadian baccalaureate nursing programs. The findings foster understanding of key enablers and challenges when providing students with clinical opportunities to develop the CHN role related to social injustice, inequity, and the social determinants of health. The findings may also have implications for nursing programs internationally that are addressing these concepts in their community health clinical courses.
PubMed ID
19222394 View in PubMed
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Work and disability at the age of 30 years. A sociomedical study of a birth-cohort from Bergen. V. Social background and recruitment to the school system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41477
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1979;7(2):73-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
D. Svendsen
F O Kinge
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1979;7(2):73-8
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Education of Mentally Retarded
Education, Continuing
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Occupations
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The basis of the present study is a cohort of 1570 persons, all live births in 1940 of mothers then residing in Bergen. This birth-control was followed up in the compulsory school system at the age of 14 years. Information from the "parsons' lists" (birth registers) was gathered concerning the parents' social background, while facts about the students' recruitment to the compulsory school system in Bergen were obtained from the local files of the various schools and the files of The National Services for the Mentally Retarded. For the purpose of collecting more detailed information, a sample was taken from the birthcohort. This sample was formed on the basis of a stratification of the cohort according to type of school attended at 14 years of age. By supplementing the group comprising persons attending Special Schools for the Educable Mentally Retarded and the group including persons cared for by the National Services for the Mentally Retarded, a total sample of 262 persons was reached. It is found that recruitment to the school system varies considerably with socio-economic background. Children of higher officials were highly over-represented in Junior High School, while children of workers were noticeably under-represented at this type of school. Children of workers were over-represented in Continuation School, Elementary School classes for slow learners and Special Schools for the educable mentally retarded. However, a proportionally very similar representation of the social groups in the services for the mentally retarded was found.
PubMed ID
482901 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Medical and social problems in gerontology and geriatrics: the acknowledgment of patients and medical personnel].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156774
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2008;21(1):160-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008

Transforming health professional education through social accountability: Canada's Northern Ontario School of Medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115555
Source
Med Teach. 2013 Jun;35(6):490-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Roger Strasser
John C Hogenbirk
Bruce Minore
David C Marsh
Sue Berry
William G McCready
Lisa Graves
Author Affiliation
Northern Ontario School of Medicine, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. roger.strasser@nosm.ca
Source
Med Teach. 2013 Jun;35(6):490-6
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Humans
Mandatory Programs
Medically underserved area
Nutritionists - education
Ontario
Physician Assistants - education
Professional Competence
Schools, Medical
Social Responsibility
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM) has a social accountability mandate to contribute to improving the health of the people and communities of Northern Ontario. NOSM recruits students from Northern Ontario or similar backgrounds and provides Distributed Community Engaged Learning in over 70 clinical and community settings located in the region, a vast underserved rural part of Canada.
NOSM and the Centre for Rural and Northern Health Research (CRaNHR) used mixed methods studies to track NOSM medical learners and dietetic interns, and to assess the socioeconomic impact of NOSM.
Ninety-one percent of all MD students come from Northern Ontario with substantial inclusion of Aboriginal (7%) and Francophone (22%) students. Sixty-one percent of MD graduates have chosen family practice (predominantly rural) training. The socioeconomic impact of NOSM included new economic activity, more than double the School's budget; enhanced retention and recruitment for the universities and hospital/health services; and a sense of empowerment among community participants attributable in large part to NOSM.
There are signs that NOSM is successful in graduating health professionals who have the skills and desire to practice in rural/remote communities and that NOSM is having a largely positive socioeconomic impact on Northern Ontario.
PubMed ID
23496120 View in PubMed
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Social capital, health, and Francophone minorities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168597
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97 Suppl 2:S16-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
Louise Bouchard
Anne Gilbert
Rodrigue Landry
Kenneth Deveau
Author Affiliation
Sociology / Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, 1 Stewart #308, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5. Louise.bouchard@uottawa.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97 Suppl 2:S16-20
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Canada
Communication
Cultural Diversity
Educational Status
Ethnic Groups - education - psychology
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Priorities
Humans
Language
Minority Groups - education - psychology
Public Health
Research
Residence Characteristics
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The goal of this article is to outline the analytical perspectives of the concept of social capital regarding health and health management. Social capital, as defined in terms of social networks and resources, has a positive impact on a number of areas, notably the health, well-being, and social and economic development of communities. It is also a useful tool for implementing social policy, especially for marginal populations, the elderly, social assistance payments, etc. An action strategy based on the support and development of networks is the key to achieving the social development, health, and well-being of populations. The social ties promoted by these networks provide people with social, cognitive, and emotional support. This has a direct impact on their self-esteem and sense of personal achievement. They also facilitate access to social resources, including social advancement opportunities. In this paper, we examine the vitality, determinants of health, and health management of Canada's minority Francophone communities.
PubMed ID
16805156 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97 Suppl 2:S43-6
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Author
Irving Rootman
Peggy Edwards
Author Affiliation
Centre for Community Health Promotion Research, University of Victoria, Box 3060, STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3R4. irootman@uvic.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97 Suppl 2:S43-6
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Cooperative Behavior
Cultural Diversity
Educational Status
Ethnic Groups - education
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy
Health Priorities
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services Research
Humans
Power (Psychology)
Public Health - education
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This concluding article comments on what we learned from the conference, what we still need to know, and what we need to do now. It describes what participants said about the impact of the conference and the follow-up steps that have been taken so far. In terms of what we learned, there was agreement on the importance of culture in understanding literacy and health literacy; the importance of context; the integral relationship between literacy and health literacy and the concept of "empowerment;" the value of efforts to improve health through literacy and health literacy; and the need for collaboration. We need more and better information on how our various efforts are working; the cost of low literacy; the links between health, education, and lifelong learning; the needs and strengths of Aboriginal people, and the perspectives of Francophone and ethnocultural groups. Specific topics worthy of pursuit are suggested. They are followed by a list of recommendations from the conference related to focussing on language and culture, and to building best practices, knowledge, and healthy public policy. The paper presents some findings from the conference evaluation, which suggests that the conference met its goals. It concludes by reporting on actions that have been taken to implement the conference recommendations, including the establishment of a Health Literacy Expert Committee and the submission of several funding proposals.
PubMed ID
16805161 View in PubMed
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Cautionary notes on teaching water safety skills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213690
Source
Inj Prev. 1995 Dec;1(4):218-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
P. Barss
Author Affiliation
Injury Prevention Program, Direction de la Santé Publique de Montreal-Centre, Québec, Canada.
Source
Inj Prev. 1995 Dec;1(4):218-9
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child, Preschool
Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic
Drowning - prevention & control
Female
Health Education - methods
Humans
Infant
Male
Primary Prevention - education
Safety
Socioeconomic Factors
Swimming - education
Water
Notes
Comment On: Inj Prev. 1995 Dec;1(4):228-339346036
PubMed ID
9346034 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Entry characteristics of diploma students to the university: future repercussions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240255
Source
Infirm Can. 1984 Aug;26(7):19-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1984

1191 records – page 1 of 120.