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684 records – page 1 of 69.

[Current tasks of physician training in protection of children's and adolescents' health].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217075
Source
Gig Sanit. 1994 Nov-Dec;(9):17-9
Publication Type
Article

Breastfeeding: a course for health professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207312
Source
Can Nurse. 1997 Oct;93(9):35-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
S. Moxley
N. Sims-Jones
A. Vargha
M. Chamberlain
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Ottawa.
Source
Can Nurse. 1997 Oct;93(9):35-8
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding
Canada
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Female
Health education
Health promotion
Humans
Infant
Mothers - education
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Breastfeeding advocates say that breastfeeding is health promotion in its purest form. Its considerable health benefits to the infant and the mother are well documented. Recent research has identified breastfeeding as a key factor in the prevention of sudden infant death syndrome and increased cognitive functioning. As a method of feeding, breastfeeding offers immediate economic advantages to the parents and long term economic savings to society. One author reports that the exclusive breastfeeding of infants for four months could save the Province of Ontario at least $862,000 a year just by reducing the need for the treatment of otitis media. Another researcher calculated the cost of treating 150 bottle-fed babies hospitalized for gastroenteritis at $450,000 Canadian, while reminding us that "hospitalization for gastroenteritis is almost unknown for exclusively breastfed infants." With all these known benefits, why is breastfeeding not more prevalent among Canadian mothers?
PubMed ID
9369550 View in PubMed
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Do patients' comfort levels and attitudes regarding medical student involvement vary across specialties?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158751
Source
Med Teach. 2008 Feb;30(1):48-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Kavitha Passaperuma
Jennifer Higgins
Stephanie Power
Tamsen Taylor
Author Affiliation
Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, Canada. kpassaperuma2007@meds.uwo.ca
Source
Med Teach. 2008 Feb;30(1):48-54
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Clerkship - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Medical
Family Practice - education
Female
General Surgery - education
Gynecology - education
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Obstetrics - education
Ontario
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Pediatrics - education
Professional-Patient Relations
Specialization
Students, Medical
Urology - education
Abstract
Studies on patient comfort with medical student involvement have been conducted within several specialties and have consistently reported positive results. However, it is unknown whether the intrinsic differences between specialties may influence the degree to which patients are comfortable with student involvement in their care.
This is the first study to investigate whether patient comfort varies across specialties.
A total of 625 patients were surveyed in teaching clinics in Family Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynaecology, Urology, General Surgery, and Paediatrics. Seven patient attitudes and patients' comfort levels based on student gender, level of training, and type of clinical involvement were assessed.
Patients in all specialties shared similar comfort levels and attitudes regarding medical student involvement for the majority of parameters assessed, suggesting that findings in this area may be generalised between specialties. Most of the inter-specialty variation found pertained to patient preference for student gender and the genitourinary specialties.
As there are numerous specialties that have never undergone a similar investigation of their patients, this study has important implications for medical educators in those specialties by supporting their ability to apply the results and recommendations of studies conducted in other specialties to their own.
PubMed ID
18278651 View in PubMed
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Specialist training in pediatric anesthesia - the Scandinavian approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89916
Source
Paediatr Anaesth. 2009 May;19(5):428-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Hansen Tom G
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia & Intensive Care, Odense University Hospital, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark. tomghansen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Paediatr Anaesth. 2009 May;19(5):428-33
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology - education
Child, Preschool
Curriculum
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Pediatrics - education
Scandinavia
Abstract
There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine has coordinated an advanced Inter-Nordic educational program in pediatric anesthesia and intensive care. The training program is managed by a Steering Committee. This program is intended for physicians who recently have received their specialist degree in anesthesiology and intensive care. The training period is 12 months of which 9 months are dedicated to pediatric anesthesia and 3 months to pediatric intensive care. During the 1-year training period, the candidates are designated a Scandinavian host clinic (at a tertiary pediatric center in Scandinavia approved by the Steering Committee). The host clinic employs the candidate in an appropriate position for the duration of the training program. The program also includes three theoretical courses each of 4 days duration and a 4-week exchange module at another pediatric center inside or outside Scandinavia. In this article the Scandinavian training program in pediatric anesthesia and intensive care is presented and discussed in more details. International collaboration on how best to arrange and organize a training program in pediatric anesthesia and intensive care is encouraged.
PubMed ID
19236599 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Emerg Nurs. 2008 Feb;34(1):77-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Eloise Czekalla
Author Affiliation
Trillium Health Centre, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. eczekalla@thc.on.ca
Source
J Emerg Nurs. 2008 Feb;34(1):77-9
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Education, Distance - methods
Electronic Mail
Emergency Nursing - education
Emergency Service, Hospital
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inservice training
Ontario
Pediatric Nursing - education
PubMed ID
18237675 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Improving qualifications of auxiliary medical pediatric staff in rural hospitals of a medical district]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44055
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1970 Sep-Oct;5:26-7
Publication Type
Article

Health education in preventive child health care in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38646
Source
Arztl Jugendkd. 1988;79(2):87-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988

Teaching X-ray interpretation: selecting the radiographs by the target population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151133
Source
Med Educ. 2009 May;43(5):434-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Kathy Boutis
Martin Pecaric
Martin Pusic
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. boutis@pol.net
Source
Med Educ. 2009 May;43(5):434-41
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Competence
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - methods
Educational Measurement - methods
Humans
Infant
Observer Variation
Ontario
Radiography - methods
Radiology - education
Reproducibility of Results
X-rays
Abstract
The unbiased selection of images representing a spectrum of diagnostic difficulty is an important first step in designing effective assessment and teaching interventions for X-ray interpretation.
This study aimed to develop a scale that would reliably differentiate more difficult X-rays from those that are easier to interpret.
After pilot testing, an X-ray difficulty scale (XRDS) was developed. Raters of different learner levels from two universities were presented with 20 chest X-rays (CXRs) and asked to read them and then to answer the scale questions that would help to differentiate the level of difficulty of interpretation of each film. Reliability of the scale was evaluated. Face validity of the scale was assessed and the construct validity of two hypotheses was tested.
The final scale consisted of five questions in which a given X-ray could score from--10 (most difficult) to + 10 (easiest to interpret) by a single rater. Raters included 53 medical students, 10 paediatric residents and 10 emergency staff. The scale demonstrated excellent internal consistency (r = 0.94), inter-rater reliability (r = 0.95) and overall reliability (r = 0.90) in medical students. Construct validity testing demonstrated good correlation (r = 0.72) between diagnostic accuracy and mean XRDS score. Mean scores on the scale were significantly lower (indicating that CXRs were more difficult to interpret) for students than for resident and staff doctors (P
PubMed ID
19422490 View in PubMed
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Cautionary notes on teaching water safety skills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213690
Source
Inj Prev. 1995 Dec;1(4):218-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
P. Barss
Author Affiliation
Injury Prevention Program, Direction de la Santé Publique de Montreal-Centre, Québec, Canada.
Source
Inj Prev. 1995 Dec;1(4):218-9
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child, Preschool
Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic
Drowning - prevention & control
Female
Health Education - methods
Humans
Infant
Male
Primary Prevention - education
Safety
Socioeconomic Factors
Swimming - education
Water
Notes
Comment On: Inj Prev. 1995 Dec;1(4):228-339346036
PubMed ID
9346034 View in PubMed
Less detail

Practical resources for nurses and other health care providers involved in the care of children at risk for respiratory syncytial virus infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119138
Source
Neonatal Netw. 2012 Nov-Dec;31(6):387-400
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marianne Bracht
Debbie Basevitz
Marilyn Cranis
Rose Paulley
Bosco Paes
Author Affiliation
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Mount Sinai Hospital, 775 A-600 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1X5, Canada. mbracht@mtsinai.on.ca
Source
Neonatal Netw. 2012 Nov-Dec;31(6):387-400
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Caregivers - education
Child
Child, Preschool
Consumer Health Information
Education, Medical, Continuing
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Patient Education as Topic
Preventive Health Services - methods - organization & administration
Program Development
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - nursing - prevention & control
Risk assessment
Abstract
Health care staff and families with young children are often unware of the ease of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) spread and potential clinical consequences of serious respiratory illness. Successful Canadian RSV prophylaxis (RSVP) programs (a) provide practical educational resources on RSV and respiratory disease that consider language and cultural barriers; (b) develop policies to identify all children eligible for RSVP with palivizumab; (c) emphasize compliance with RSVP, particularly during patient transfer between hospitals, community clinics, and remote outpost centers; and (d) establish collaborative networks to help ensure optimum RSVP compliance for all high-risk children. Herein, we share practical resources and key educational references for counseling of caregivers with infants or young children at risk for RSV infection, and health care providers participating in RSVP program development.
PubMed ID
23134645 View in PubMed
Less detail

684 records – page 1 of 69.