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Procedural specificity in laparoscopic simulator training: protocol for a randomised educational superiority trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262673
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2014;14:215
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Flemming Bjerrum
Jette Led Sorensen
Lars Konge
Jane Lindschou
Susanne Rosthøj
Bent Ottesen
Jeanett Strandbygaard
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2014;14:215
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Appendectomy - education
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Denmark
Education, Medical - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Laparoscopy - education
Male
Manikins
Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures - education
Models, Educational
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Ectopic - surgery
Salpingectomy - education
Single-Blind Method
User-Computer Interface
Young Adult
Abstract
The use of structured curricula for minimally invasive surgery training is becoming increasingly popular. However, many laparoscopic training programs still use basic skills and isolated task training, despite increasing evidence to support the use of training models with higher functional resemblance, such as whole procedural modules. In contrast to basic skills training, procedural training involves several cognitive skills such as elements of planning, movement integration, and how to avoid adverse events. The objective of this trial is to investigate the specificity of procedural practice in laparoscopic simulator training.
A randomised single-centre educational superiority trial. Participants are 96 surgical novices (medical students) without prior laparoscopic experience. Participants start by practicing a series of basic skills tasks to a predefined proficiency level on a virtual reality laparoscopy simulator. Upon reaching proficiency, the participants are randomised to either the intervention group, which practices two procedures (an appendectomy followed by a salpingectomy) or to the control group, practicing only one procedure (a salpingectomy) on the simulator. 1:1 central randomisation is used and participants are stratified by sex and time to complete the basic skills. Data collection is done at a surgical skills centre.The primary outcome is the number of repetitions required to reach a predefined proficiency level on the salpingectomy module. The secondary outcome is the total training time to proficiency. The improvement in motor skills and effect on cognitive load are also explored.
The results of this trial might provide new knowledge on how the technical part of surgical training curricula should be comprised in the future. To examine the specificity of practice in procedural simulator training is of great importance in order to develop more comprehensive surgical curricula.
ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02069951.
Notes
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2014 Apr;93(4):359-6624392777
Cites: Med Teach. 2014 May;36(5):371-8424593808
Cites: BMJ. 2009;338:b180219443914
Cites: Surg Endosc. 2009 Jun;23(6):1365-7118855053
Cites: BMC Med. 2010;8:1820334633
Cites: Surg Endosc. 2011 Jul;25(7):2063-7021614665
Cites: J Minim Invasive Gynecol. 2011 Sep-Oct;18(5):597-60621783431
Cites: J Urol. 2012 May;187(5):1861-622425041
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2012 Sep 18;157(6):429-3822945832
Cites: Acad Med. 2013 Feb;88(2):162-723269304
Cites: Surg Endosc. 2013 Feb;27(2):364-7722956001
Cites: Ann Surg. 2013 May;257(5):839-4423295321
Cites: Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2013 Jul;169(2):347-5223608628
Cites: J Mot Behav. 2014;46(1):17-2324164634
Cites: Acad Med. 2014 Mar;89(3):387-9224448038
Cites: Surg Endosc. 2014 Jun;28(6):1821-924442678
Cites: Psychol Res. 2014 Nov;78(6):878-9124202287
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2001 Dec 4;135(11):982-911730399
Cites: Acad Med. 2004 Oct;79(10 Suppl):S70-8115383395
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Dec 21;355(25):2664-917182991
Cites: BMJ. 2008 Mar 15;336(7644):601-518316340
Cites: BMJ. 2008 May 17;336(7653):1129-3118483056
Cites: J Urol. 2008 Dec;180(6):2588-91; discussion 259118950817
PubMed ID
25304939 View in PubMed
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Undergraduate education in endodontology at two European dental schools. A comparison between the Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden and Faculty of Odontology, Paris 5 University (René Descartes), France.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187931
Source
Eur J Dent Educ. 2002 Nov;6(4):176-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Kerstin Petersson
Helena Olsson
Christina Söderström
Isabelle Fouilloux
Nadège Jegat
Gérard Lévy
Author Affiliation
Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Dent Educ. 2002 Nov;6(4):176-81
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Education, Dental - methods
Educational Measurement
Endodontics - education - standards
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
International Educational Exchange
Paris
Problem-Based Learning
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Schools, Dental
Self-Evaluation Programs
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare the courses in endodontics and to assess the treatment quality in the student clinics in two dental schools, in Malmö, Sweden and Paris, France. A further aim was to improve the curriculum development in Paris 5 and Malmö by testing student exchange programmes. The comparison was based on the guidelines for undergraduate education set up by the European Society of Endodontology (ESE) [Int. Endod. J. 25 (1992) 169] and on the criteria formulated by Qualtrough and Dummer [Int. Endod. J. 30 (1997) 234]. The latter criteria covered the following aspects: educational methods, the timing of endodontic teaching, pre-clinical practical exercises, student assessment, recommended literature, clinical/practical procedures, the education of the staff and number of students per teacher. The quality guidelines for endodontic treatment set up by the ESE [Int. Endod. J. 27 (1994) 115] were used for the assessment of the quality of the treatment. The following aspects were covered: history, diagnosis and treatment planning, records, infection control, root-canal treatment, assessment of endodontic treatment. The undergraduate education in endodontics was fundamentally similar in Paris 5 and Malmö. The main differences observed were related to: Educational methods: In Malmö, problem-based learning and in Paris 5, traditional. Assessment of student performance. In Malmö, self-assessment and in Paris 5, credits for clinical/practical procedures. Clinical/practical procedures relating to infection control. Aseptic treatment regimens were more meticulously performed in Malmö than in Paris 5. Assessment (follow-up) of all endodontic treatments was a routine only in Malmö.
PubMed ID
12410669 View in PubMed
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[The disaster preparedness concerning personnel at the hospitals in the Disaster Preparedness Region II: Viborg, Ringkjøbing and Aarhus counties].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206552
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Feb 2;160(6):813-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2-1998
Author
P J Tordrup
S R Kjeldsen
Author Affiliation
Viborg Sygehus, ortopaedkirurgisk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Feb 2;160(6):813-5
Date
Feb-2-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Denmark
Disaster planning
Education, Medical, Continuing
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Education, Professional, Retraining
Emergency Medicine - education
Emergency Service, Hospital - manpower - organization & administration - standards
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Personnel, Hospital
Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim of this investigation was to describe the disaster preparedness concerning hospital staff members in Viborg, Ringkjøbing and Arhus county, and to describe the outcome of the disaster medicine-courses given in the region--in theory as well as practice. In the region a questionnaire was sent to the chief doctor and chief nurse for the involved departments, and a personal questionnaire was sent to all the doctors and nurses in the region, who had participated in one or more courses in disaster medicine during the period 1990-1995. Of the total number of doctors at the involved departments, 7% of the residents, 29% of the senior residents and 56% of the consultants had taken a course in disaster medicine, as had 33% of the nurses. Only 15% had taken more than one course, and as few as 2% had had a follow-up course to the primary one given in the region. Forty-one percent had used their acquired knowledge either in theory or practice: 55% for educational purposes, 11% for disaster planning and 12% for buying equipment for the hospital. In general an easier access to follow-up is desired, and there seems to be a need to give more consideration to the priorities of the individual departments concerning the selection of participants to the courses in disaster medicine.
PubMed ID
9469977 View in PubMed
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Recall of an oral health education programme by nursing personnel in special housing facilities for the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62805
Source
Gerodontology. 2001 Jul;18(1):7-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
G. Paulsson
B. Söderfeldt
B. Fridlund
T. Nederfors
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Promotion Research, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden. gun.paulsson@halmstad.mail.telia.com
Source
Gerodontology. 2001 Jul;18(1):7-14
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - education
Clinical Competence
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Nursing
Follow-Up Studies
Health Education, Dental
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Mental Recall
Nurses
Nurses' Aides - education
Nursing Staff - education
Oral Hygiene
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the recall of oral health knowledge and confidence by nursing personnel in special housing facilities for the elderly, three years after an education programme. DESIGN: A cross sectional design using a questionnaire. SAMPLE: All nursing personnel, a total of 2,901 subjects, in five municipalities in south-western Sweden; of whom 950 had attended the programme. The response rate was 67% (1930 subjects). INTERVENTION: An oral health education programme consisting of four one-hour lessons. RESULTS: The oral health education programme still had an effect on the participants' attitudes towards oral health three years later. When comparing the trained group (OHEP+) which attended the programme with those who did not have training (OHEP-), the perceived ability, opportunity and the knowledge of oral health were significantly better in the former group, p
PubMed ID
11813391 View in PubMed
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Improvement in the hospital organisation of CPR training and outcome after cardiac arrest in Sweden during a 10-year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137845
Source
Resuscitation. 2011 Apr;82(4):431-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
S. Aune
M. Eldh
J. Engdahl
S. Holmberg
J. Lindqvist
L. Svensson
E. Oddby
J. Herlitz
Author Affiliation
Inst of Medicine, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, SE-413 45 Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Resuscitation. 2011 Apr;82(4):431-5
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - education
Follow-Up Studies
Health Personnel - education
Heart Arrest - mortality - therapy
Hospital Administration - education
Hospitals
Humans
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To describe (a) changes in the organisation of training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the treatment of cardiac arrest in hospital in Sweden and (b) the clinical achievement, i.e. survival and cerebral function, among survivors after in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) in Sweden.
Aspects of CPR training among health care providers (HCPs) and treatment of IHCA in Sweden were evaluated in 3 national surveys (1999, 2003 and 2008). Patients with IHCA are recorded in a National Register covering two thirds of Swedish hospitals.
The proportion of hospitals with a CPR coordinator increased from 45% in 1999 to 93% in 2008. The majority of co-ordinators are nurses. The proportions of hospitals with local guidelines for acceptable delays from cardiac arrest to the start of CPR and defibrillation increased from 48% in 1999 to 88% in 2008. The proportion of hospitals using local defibrillation outside intensive care units prior to arrival of rescue team increased from 55% in 1999 to 86% in 2008. During the past 4 years in Sweden, survival to hospital discharge has been 29%. Among survivors, 93% have a cerebral performance category (CPC) score of I or II, indicating acceptable cerebral function.
During the last 10 years, there was a marked improvement in CPR training and treatment of IHCA in Sweden. During the past 4 years, survival after IHCA is high and the majority of survivors have acceptable cerebral function.
PubMed ID
21242019 View in PubMed
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Evaluating arts-based cancer education using an internet survey among Alaska community health workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267849
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2014 Sep;29(3):529-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Melany Cueva
Katie Cueva
Mark Dignan
Anne Lanier
Regina Kuhnley
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2014 Sep;29(3):529-35
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control
Community Health Workers - education
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health education
Humans
Male
Medical Illustration - education
Medicine in Art
Young Adult
Abstract
Cancer, considered a rare disease among Alaska Native people as recently as the 1950s, surpassed heart disease in the 1990s to become the leading cause of mortality. In response to Alaska's village-based Community Health Workers' (CHWs) desire to learn more about cancer for themselves and the people in their communities, cancer education that incorporated the expressive arts of moving, drawing, and sculpting was developed, implemented, and evaluated. Arts-based education integrates the dynamic wisdom and experiences of Alaska Native people and western medical knowledge to share cancer information in a culturally respectful way. Between May 2009 and March 2013, 12 5-day courses that included arts activities to support cancer information were provided for 118 CHWs in Anchorage, AK, USA. A post-course internet survey was conducted in April 2013, to learn how arts-based cancer education affected participants' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Surveys were completed by 54 of the 96 course participants; 22 course participants were lost to follow-up. As a result of integrating the arts with cancer education, respondents reported an increase in their cancer knowledge and comfort with talking about cancer. Additionally, 82 % (44) of respondents described feeling differently about cancer. By integrating the arts with cancer information, participants reported healthy behavior changes for themselves (76 %), with their families (70 %), and in their work (72 %). The expressive arts of moving, drawing, and sculpting provided a creative pathway for diverse adult learners in Alaska to increase their cancer knowledge, comfort with talking about cancer, and wellness behaviors.
PubMed ID
24189832 View in PubMed
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A chronicle of BScN honours/ non-honours outcomes and experiences post-graduation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158592
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2007;20(4):79-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Angela Gillis
Author Affiliation
St. Francis Xavier University, School of Nursing, Antigonish, NS, Canada. agillis@stfx.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2007;20(4):79-97
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Education, Nursing, Graduate
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Leadership
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia
Nursing Research
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Teaching - methods
Abstract
This paper reports on a graduate follow-up of the outcomes of participation in an honours BScN program, two to seven years post-graduation. It compares two groups of graduates with high GPA scores, both initially eligible to complete the honours program. One group completed the honours program; the other group completed the regular BScN program. In phase 1 of the study, a self-administered mailed questionnaire was sent to participants to assess their involvement in research activities, occupancy of leadership positions, enrollment in graduate studies and demonstration of liberal education competencies in their professional lives after graduation. In phase two, personal interviews were held with a purposive subsample of participants to explore early career workplace experiences with research-based activities and participants' perceptions of factors influencing their decision to complete or not to complete the honours program. Graduates with high GPA scores from both programs demonstrated expected professional outcomes post-graduation. Follow up at 10-12 years post-graduation and replication with larger samples are recommended.
PubMed ID
18303726 View in PubMed
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Conducting rigorous research with subgroups of at-risk youth: lessons learned from a teen pregnancy prevention project in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289666
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:31776
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
2016
Author
Kathryn Hohman-Billmeier
Margaret Nye
Stephanie Martin
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK, USA; khohman@alaska.edu.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:31776
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Curriculum
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - prevention & control
Risk factors
Sex education - methods
Sexual Health - education
Young Adult
Abstract
In 2010, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) received federal funding to test an evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention program. The grant required a major modification to an existing program and a randomized control trial (RCT) to test its effectiveness. As the major modifications, Alaska used peer educators instead of adults to deliver the program to youth aged 14-19 instead of the original curriculum intended age range of 12-14. Cultural and approach adaptations were included as well. After 4 years of implementation and data collection, the sample was too small to provide statistically significant results. The lack of findings gave no information about the modification, nor any explanation of how the curriculum was received, or reasons for the small sample. This paper reports on a case study follow-up to the RCT to better understand outcome and implementation results. For this study, researchers reviewed project documents and interviewed peer educators, state and local staff, and evaluators. Three themes emerged from the data: (a) the professional growth of peer educators and development of peer education, (b) difficulties resulting from curriculum content, especially for subpopulations of sexually active youth, youth identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex and/or asexual, pregnant, and parenting youth and (c) the appropriateness of an RCT with subpopulations of at-risk youth. Three recommendations emerged from the case study. First, including as many stakeholders as possible in the program and evaluation design phases is essential, and must be supported by appropriate funding streams and training. Second, there must be recognition of the multiple small subpopulations found in Alaska when adapting programs designed for a larger and more homogeneous population. Third, RCTs may not be appropriate for all population subgroups.
Notes
Cites: Health Educ Behav. 2006 Apr;33(2):130-47 PMID 16531510
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010 Feb;164(2):152-9 PMID 20124144
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1992 Mar;82(3):372-7 PMID 1536352
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 1999 Apr;27(2):161-87 PMID 10425698
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2009 Jul 16;9:52 PMID 19607668
Cites: JAMA. 1998 May 20;279(19):1529-36 PMID 9605896
Cites: BMJ. 2006 Feb 18;332(7538):413-6 PMID 16484270
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2012 May;22(5):708-18 PMID 22232294
PubMed ID
27938637 View in PubMed
Less detail

Conducting rigorous research with subgroups of at-risk youth: lessons learned from a teen pregnancy prevention project in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289508
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:31776
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
2016
Author
Kathryn Hohman-Billmeier
Margaret Nye
Stephanie Martin
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK, USA; khohman@alaska.edu.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:31776
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Curriculum
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - prevention & control
Risk factors
Sex education - methods
Sexual Health - education
Young Adult
Abstract
In 2010, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) received federal funding to test an evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention program. The grant required a major modification to an existing program and a randomized control trial (RCT) to test its effectiveness. As the major modifications, Alaska used peer educators instead of adults to deliver the program to youth aged 14-19 instead of the original curriculum intended age range of 12-14. Cultural and approach adaptations were included as well. After 4 years of implementation and data collection, the sample was too small to provide statistically significant results. The lack of findings gave no information about the modification, nor any explanation of how the curriculum was received, or reasons for the small sample. This paper reports on a case study follow-up to the RCT to better understand outcome and implementation results. For this study, researchers reviewed project documents and interviewed peer educators, state and local staff, and evaluators. Three themes emerged from the data: (a) the professional growth of peer educators and development of peer education, (b) difficulties resulting from curriculum content, especially for subpopulations of sexually active youth, youth identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex and/or asexual, pregnant, and parenting youth and (c) the appropriateness of an RCT with subpopulations of at-risk youth. Three recommendations emerged from the case study. First, including as many stakeholders as possible in the program and evaluation design phases is essential, and must be supported by appropriate funding streams and training. Second, there must be recognition of the multiple small subpopulations found in Alaska when adapting programs designed for a larger and more homogeneous population. Third, RCTs may not be appropriate for all population subgroups.
Notes
Cites: Health Educ Behav. 2006 Apr;33(2):130-47 PMID 16531510
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010 Feb;164(2):152-9 PMID 20124144
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1992 Mar;82(3):372-7 PMID 1536352
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 1999 Apr;27(2):161-87 PMID 10425698
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2009 Jul 16;9:52 PMID 19607668
Cites: JAMA. 1998 May 20;279(19):1529-36 PMID 9605896
Cites: BMJ. 2006 Feb 18;332(7538):413-6 PMID 16484270
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2012 May;22(5):708-18 PMID 22232294
PubMed ID
27938637 View in PubMed
Less detail

The development of reflective learning in the context of health counselling and health promotion during nurse education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194346
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2001 Jun;34(5):648-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
L. Liimatainen
M. Poskiparta
P. Karhila
A. Sjögren
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Sport Sciences, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, and Continuing Education Manager, School of Health and Social Care, Jyväskylä Polytechnic, Jyväskylä, Finland. leena.liimatainen@jypoly.fi
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2001 Jun;34(5):648-58
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Counseling - education
Education, Nursing, Diploma Programs - organization & administration
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Learning
Models, Educational
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Process
Power (Psychology)
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Students, Nursing - psychology
Thinking
Abstract
The purpose of this follow-up study was to describe the development of reflective learning of 16 student nurses in the context of health counselling and promotion during clinical training of a 3-year nursing education programme in two Finnish polytechnics. The first aim was to analyse the levels of reflectivity in the student nurses' reflections on their videotaped counselling situations. The second aim was to explore the qualitative features of the reflective health counselling learning process in the context of health promotion. The theoretical background of the study was based on a transformative learning theory.
The data consisted of stimulated recall interviews with 16 student nurses conducted once a year between 1998 and 2000. The data were analysed using categorization and thematic analysis.
The findings of the study showed that half of the students in the research group reached the level of critical consciousness during their nursing education. The others remained at the level of consciousness. Two students who represented thoughtful action without reflection in the first study year were able to reach reflection and even critical reflection later during their education. The meaning schemas of counselling developed and were enriched when the students moved into the higher stages of reflection. There were features of an empowerment approach to health promotion only in the meaning schemas and perspectives of critical reflectors.
These results may indicate that the empowerment approach to health promotion within the modern health promoting role of nurses requires critical reflection. Therefore, effective methods and evaluation tools of reflective learning are needed to support learning from practice via critical reflection.
PubMed ID
11380733 View in PubMed
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809 records – page 1 of 81.