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3701 records – page 1 of 371.

Assessment of objectives of post-doctoral general dentistry programs in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195753
Source
Spec Care Dentist. 2000 Sep-Oct;20(5):191-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
J B Epstein
A. Tejani
P. Glassman
Author Affiliation
Department of Dentistry, Vancouver Hospital & Health Sciences Centre, 855 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9, Canada.
Source
Spec Care Dentist. 2000 Sep-Oct;20(5):191-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia, Dental
Canada
Clinical Competence
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dental Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Education, Dental, Graduate - organization & administration
Emergency Medicine - education
Endodontics - education
General Practice, Dental - education
Humans
Oral Medicine - education
Organizational Objectives
Orthodontics - education
Pathology, Oral - education
Pediatric Dentistry - education
Periodontics - education
Pharmacology - education
Practice Management, Dental
Preventive Dentistry - education
Primary Health Care
Prosthodontics - education
Public Health Dentistry - education
Questionnaires
Surgery, Oral - education
United States
Abstract
Objectives of hospital-based post-doctoral general dentistry programs in Canada were assessed by questionnaire. Seventy percent (14 of 20) of the program directors responded. Educational goals and objectives were assessed in professional skills and practice management, public health and preventive dentistry, oral medicine and pathology, special needs patient care, trauma and emergency care, restorative/prosthodontic care, endodontics, orthodontics/pediatric dentistry, oral surgery, periodontics, pharmacology, and functioning in a hospital. High rankings of proficiency were related to primary care, restorative/prosthodontic, endodontic, and surgical care. Emergency care, sedation, and pharmacology were also ranked highly. Lower rankings of proficiency were reported in orthodontics, aspects of public health dentistry, practice management, and advanced oral and maxiliofacial surgery. When the results of the Canadian survey were compared with those of a survey of US post-doctoral general dentistry programs, substantial similarity was seen. The findings support continuing reciprocity in accreditation standards between the Canadian and American Commissions on Dental Education and Dental Accreditation.
PubMed ID
11203897 View in PubMed
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Emergency health services informational and educational programs: development and present status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111423
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Jan 28;96(4):221-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-28-1967
Author
F C Pace
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Jan 28;96(4):221-5
Date
Jan-28-1967
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Civil Defense - education
Curriculum
Disasters
Education, Dental
Education, Medical
Education, Nursing
Education, Pharmacy
Emergencies
Health Occupations
Humans
Schools
Abstract
The development and present status of the Emergency Health Services (EHS) national and educational programs are discussed. Instituted in 1951 for medical and dental practitioners at a military school at Camp Borden, professional civilian indoctrination was later assumed by EHS at Canadian Emergency Measures College (CEMC). The federally sponsored courses there are now specialized; provincial EHS authorities undertake general indoctrination. Courses for graduates in pharmacy and nursing are also offered at CEMC. Hospital Disaster Institutes have been held across the country since 1954; Public Health Disaster Institutes, since 1966. Schools of Hygiene include the subject in graduate programs. Some years ago, three medical faculties introduced undergraduate teaching in mass casualty care; now, encouraged by the Association of Canadian Medical Colleges, a larger number are doing so. Several faculties of Dentistry, all faculties of Pharmacy, and 132 of 177 nursing schools teach apposite aspects. Professional journals have published many articles on this subject; this, for example, is the fourth Emergency Health Services Symposium presented by The Canadian Medical Association Journal.
PubMed ID
6015744 View in PubMed
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Deficiencies of cross-training between pediatrics and otolaryngology: a survey of specialists in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171224
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2006 Mar;70(3):545-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Michael Clifford Fabian
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Humber River Regional Hospital, Toronto, Ont., Canada. fabianent@shaw.ca
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2006 Mar;70(3):545-51
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education - standards
Education, Medical - standards
Humans
Otolaryngology - education
Pediatrics - education
Questionnaires
Abstract
Conditions relating to the ear, nose and throat are very frequent problems encountered by general pediatricians. Similarly, a major percentage of patients seen and operated on by the general otolaryngologist are of the pediatric age group. The pilot study demonstrated that pediatric program directors of both specialties in Canada have identified a deficiency of cross-training and desire the need for more cross-training. The aim of this study was to survey practicing physicians of both specialties for their input.
Surveys were sent to a large cross-section of pediatricians and otolaryngologists in Canada. They were asked to complete a questionnaire relating to their training experience, their desired training, important topics and general comments. Demographic data were collected including generalist versus sub-specialist, the year that residency was completed and country of training. Results were tabulated and analyzed.
The response rate was high, being 70.6% and 76.2% for pediatricians and otolaryngologists, respectively. One hundred percent of pediatricians indicated that formal training by otolaryngologists was necessary, while 95% of otolaryngologists indicate a need for formal training by pediatricians during residency. Pediatricians desire more training using all three educational venues, namely lectures, clinics and rotations. While they are receiving lectures more often, they indicate that clinics are the most important mode of education. Otolaryngologists desire more formal training by pediatricians in the areas of lectures and clinics. They indicate the most important mode of education is lectures. There was no significant difference between generalists and sub-specialists or based on country of training for either group. There is some indication, in both specialties, of an increase of cross-training occurring within the past five years.
This study has shown that there is a perceived deficiency of cross-training between the two specialties. Both pediatricians and otolaryngologists have indicated that they need more formal cross-training. This is a very important area to address, as this study relates directly to the optimum health of children in Canada and worldwide.
PubMed ID
16406082 View in PubMed
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RN first assisting--1997 Canadian update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208256
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 1997 Jun;15(2):13-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
G A Groetzsch
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 1997 Jun;15(2):13-7
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Humans
Operating Room Nursing - education
Operating Room Technicians - education
Physician Assistants - education
Abstract
Canada appears to have little formal history of nurses functioning in a RN first assistant (RNFA) role. On recent examination, however, perioperative nurses are first assisting in Canada daily, and several provinces have started programs. The following articles provides an overview of RNFA activities as of April 1997.
PubMed ID
9304912 View in PubMed
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Nursing, occupational therapy, and physical therapy preparation in rheumatology in the United States and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245281
Source
J Allied Health. 1980 Nov;9(4):268-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1980
Author
A M Jette
M C Becker
Source
J Allied Health. 1980 Nov;9(4):268-75
Date
Nov-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Nursing
Humans
Occupational Therapy - education
Physical Therapy Modalities - education
Questionnaires
Rheumatology - education
United States
Abstract
Directors of undergraduate programs in nursing, physical therapy, and occupational therapy in the United States and Canada were surveyed to determine the amount and perceived adequacy of the current degree of classroom and clinical exposure to the rheumatic diseases. One hundred ninety-one (73%) of the 262 mailed questionnaires were returned. Results indicate that regardless of the actual degree of rheumatologic classroom exposure, directors in all three disciplines view current amounts as adequate. A larger proportion views levels of clinical exposure as inadequate. In general, the Canadian programs had a greater emphasis on rheumatology than their United States counterparts.
PubMed ID
7462089 View in PubMed
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The psychiatric training of medical students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244287
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1981 Aug;26(5):301-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1981
Author
G. Voineskos
S E Greben
F H Lowy
R L Smith
P D Steinhauer
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1981 Aug;26(5):301-8
Date
Aug-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Counseling - education
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - trends
Humans
Psychiatry - education
Psychotherapy - education
Specialization
Specialty Boards
Abstract
Undergraduate psychiatric education should be concerned mostly with those aspects of psychiatry required for the proper practice of medicine. Psychiatric concepts and techniques are applicable to all medical practice and relevant to the daily work of every physician or surgeon. Therefore, in the psychiatric training of medical students the focus should be primarily on teaching "psychiatry of medical practice" and much less on teaching "specialty psychiatry." The teaching of psychiatry for medical practice will be best accomplished by selecting patients who are more like those the student will see later on as a practising physician. A systematic effort should be made to develop joint teaching with other departments, if we are to hope that students will carry over the approach we teach them to other subjects of medicine. Counselling and psychotherapy are essential skills for every physician or surgeon; medical students should be taught these skills by psychiatrists who are not just skilled psychotherapists but are also comfortable in their role as physicians in view of the importance of this role for the development of the identity of the medical student as a physician. The quality of the psychiatric training of medical students is dependent to a large extent on the priority accorded to undergraduate teaching by the department of psychiatry; competing activities, however, can result in undergraduate teaching being given less than top priority. Long-standing difficulties which psychiatry and psychiatrists experience in the medical school may impede undergraduate psychiatric education; these difficulties can be lessened by the closer involvement of psychiatrists with other physicians in the clinical and educational programs.
PubMed ID
7296445 View in PubMed
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Improving gerontology content in baccalaureate nursing education through knowledge transfer to nurse educators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146197
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(3):33-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Lynn McCleary
Katherine McGilton
Veronique Boscart
Abram Oudshoorn
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON. Persistent high fever and systemic inflammation
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(3):33-46
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Education, Nursing, Graduate
Faculty, Nursing
Geriatric Nursing - education
Humans
Inservice training
Nursing Education Research
Abstract
Across practice settings, most nursing care is provided to older adults. Yet most nurses receive limited education to care for older adults, especially those with complex needs. A Knowledge Exchange Institute for Geriatric Nursing Education brought together 31 Canadian nursing faculty members and nursing doctoral students and provided them with tools and resources to enhance teaching and curriculum in baccalaureate nursing programs. Guided by the Knowledge-to-Action Process model, participants received usable summaries of the best research evidence about care for older adults and tools to increase the likelihood of successful integration of these resources in their teaching and curriculum. Feedback from participants indicates that their personal goals and the goals of the Knowledge Exchange were met. Through a public interactive wiki, participants and others will continue the process of knowledge exchange to improve nursing education and nursing care for older persons.
PubMed ID
20057265 View in PubMed
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The future of higher education for public health--2.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232218
Source
Can J Public Health. 1988 Nov-Dec;79(6):411-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
J M Last
Source
Can J Public Health. 1988 Nov-Dec;79(6):411-3
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical - trends
Health Occupations - education
Humans
Public Health - education
PubMed ID
3233563 View in PubMed
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A continuing medical education strategy for care of the elderly by the surgical specialties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214262
Source
Can J Surg. 1995 Oct;38(5):427-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
C J Patterson
W H Eaton
H T Williams
W A Easton
D B Skinner
Author Affiliation
Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont.
Source
Can J Surg. 1995 Oct;38(5):427-31
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Education, Medical, Continuing
General Surgery - education
Geriatrics - education
Humans
Abstract
As the absolute numbers and percentage of older people rises in Canada, surgeons are required to treat an increasing number of elderly patients. Recognizing the need to enhance the quality of health care for these people by continuing medical education of health care professionals, the Canadian Medical Association sponsored an invitational workshop in May 1992. The workshop group addressing surgery and its specialties identified three essential underprinnings: knowledge of the aging process (altered physiology and response to illness); decision analysis for interventions (risks, benefits and ethical dimensions); and communication skills. Three priorities for continuing education were recommended: improving knowledge of the physiologic changes that impact on the recovery of elderly patients from surgery; management of postoperative care; and improved knowledge and skills in prescribing medications for older surgical patients. Strategies to implement these priorities are outlined.
PubMed ID
7553466 View in PubMed
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3701 records – page 1 of 371.