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1756 records – page 1 of 176.

Learning in organizations working with telemedicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68892
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2002;8(2):107-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
I H Monrad Aas
Author Affiliation
The Work Research Institute, Oslo, Norway. mon-a@online.no
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2002;8(2):107-11
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Dermatology - education
Education, Continuing - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Knowledge
Learning
Male
Norway
Otolaryngology - education
Pathology - education
Psychiatry - education
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Telemedicine
Abstract
To investigate learning in telemedicine, qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 people working with telepsychiatry, teledermatology, a telepathology frozen-section service and tele-otolaryngology. More than 80% of the respondents said that they had learnt something new by using telemedicine. Most frequently the participants improved their knowledge of the specialty in which they were involved, but this was not the only way in which they learnt. The learning did not necessarily change behaviour, as two-thirds of the respondents felt that the learning had not permitted them to perform tasks for which they had previously needed assistance (although this varied somewhat with the type of telemedical work that respondents were engaged in). Two-thirds of respondents thought that something more could be done in telemedical work to promote their own learning, which shows the clear potential for learning by telemedicine. Learning could be promoted further by extending the use of the technology to other applications. To start working with telemedicine, initial instruction seems to be sufficient--a more extensive training programme appears unnecessary. In future, as many applications of telemedicine are implemented, health-care organizations may become important arenas for learning and leaders will have to focus on learning. The results of the present study clearly showed that working with telemedicine produces learning.
PubMed ID
11972946 View in PubMed
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Mentor relationship as a tool of professional development of student nurses in clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183378
Source
Int J Psychiatr Nurs Res. 2003 Sep;9(1):1014-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Mikko Saarikoski
Author Affiliation
Turku Polytechnic, Health Care Education, Ruiskatu 8, PL 20, 20 701 Turku, Finland. mikko.saarikoski@turkuamk.fi
Source
Int J Psychiatr Nurs Res. 2003 Sep;9(1):1014-24
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - methods
Finland
Humans
Internal Medicine - education
Mentors - psychology
Models, Educational
Models, Nursing
Nursing Education Research
Nursing, Supervisory
Perioperative Nursing - education
Preceptorship - methods
Psychiatric Nursing - education
Students, Nursing - psychology
Abstract
This is a condensed version of a research project relating to the design and the development of a research instrument concerning 'Mentor Relationship as a Tool of Professional Development of Student Nurses in Clinical Practice'. This short research paper is taken from and reproduces the research work undertaken by Saarikoski (2002). The main themes refer to: (1) Evaluation scale to assess the quality of clinical learning environment and (2) Supervision of student nurses during their clinical placements. Parts one and two are taken from the main research study and include the following (i) developing and testing an evaluation tool (ii) describing how nursing students experience their clinical learning environment and (iii) the supervision given by qualified staff nurses working in a hospital setting. This abridged report discusses the methodology approaches undertaken by the author and includes: (a) comparative phased twin centred study (b) a pilot scheme and (c) a primary research instrument that was developed into an extensively validated assessment-measuring tool. This report strongly suggests that there is clear evidence in this research report that the supervisory relationship is the most important single element of pedagogical activities of staff nurses. The total satisfaction of students correlated most clearly with the method of supervision and that those satisfied students had a successful mentor relationship and frequently enough access to private supervision sessions with mentor. In the sample of this empirical study (n = 279 student nurses in Finland) individualized supervision system was most common on psychiatric wards. All nurse educators and clinical practitioners working across Europe and around the World in clinical learning environments will find this paper very useful in helping them to improve and quantify the supervisory process. This study starts bridging the gap between using and integrating both at a National and European level qualitative assessment systems that relate to the learning and supervisory process. The study encourages the need for professionals to test these new instruments in other nursing cultures and reflects upon the need for further research work in this area.
PubMed ID
14533232 View in PubMed
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Effective delivery of neonatal stabilization education using videoconferencing in Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182330
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2003;9(6):334-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
L. Loewen
M M K Seshia
D. Fraser Askin
C. Cronin
S. Roberts
Author Affiliation
MBTelehealth, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. lloewen@ms.umanitoba.ca
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2003;9(6):334-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Education, Distance
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Inservice Training - methods - standards
Manitoba
Neonatal Nursing - education
Neonatology - education
Abstract
We compared face-to-face and videoconference delivery of an education programme for health professionals on the subject of neonatal stabilization skills. A pre-test/post-test control group design was used to compare knowledge acquisition and satisfaction between the two modalities. There were no statistically significant differences between delivery modalities for knowledge acquisition. Both groups showed significant gains in knowledge when pre- and post-test scores were compared. Responses to most of the items in a survey of satisfaction with the course did not differ significantly between the two groups. Face-to-face participants expressed higher levels of comfort in interacting with the presenter, and those in the videoconference group were more willing to receive the course via videoconference in the future. Videoconferencing provided an effective and acceptable way of delivering neonatal stabilization skills.
PubMed ID
14680517 View in PubMed
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Course in basic sexology for medical students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52947
Source
Br J Med Educ. 1975 Jun;9(2):114-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1975
Author
J. Beckmann
P. Hertoft
J F Larsen
A M Laursen
G. Wagner
Source
Br J Med Educ. 1975 Jun;9(2):114-24
Date
Jun-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Curriculum
Denmark
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Evaluation Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Paraphilias
Physiology - education
Psychology - education
Sex Education
Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological
Abstract
The present article describes the pilot course in basic sexology for medical students. The duration of the course was 5 days (35 hours). The themes-sex and gender, sexual physiology, contraception, sexual inadequacy, sexual deviations, and sexual counselling-were approached from many different angles. The teaching procedure comprised lectures, group work, and group discussions, internal television, films, plenary discussions, and debates. The course was evaluated by means of the sex knowledge and attitude test (SKAT) given before and after the course. Furthermore an evaluation was given by the students, by a professional teacher, and by a paramedical evaluator at the end of the course. The results showed significant changes in attitudes and knowledge.
PubMed ID
1170873 View in PubMed
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Radiation oncology--the misunderstood specialty.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240460
Source
J Can Assoc Radiol. 1984 Jun;35(2):144-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1984
Author
F. Wong
R N Fairey
Source
J Can Assoc Radiol. 1984 Jun;35(2):144-8
Date
Jun-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Career Choice
Education, Medical, Graduate
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Medical Oncology - education - manpower - trends
Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Questionnaires
Radiology - education - manpower - trends
Technology, Radiologic - education - trends
Abstract
A shortage of radiation oncologists has been a problem in both Canada and the United States of America. The fundamental step to rectify this situation is the recruitment of interested medical students. A mail-in survey was sent to 214 third- and fourth-year medical students at the University of British Columbia to evaluate attitudes to and the level of understanding of radiation oncology. The response rate was 59%. Seventy-five percent of the students were planning postgraduate training in clinically orientated specialties with good lifestyle and availability of job opportunities. However, only 18% of the respondents considered radiation oncology as a possible specialty. This survey suggests that this lack of interest is the result of misconceptions about training in the practice of radiotherapy. To better inform the medical students, teaching clinics providing them with direct contact with radiation oncologists and their patients, are invaluable. In order to generate the correct image of the specialty and the types of patients encountered, teaching in an ambulatory care setting is not to be neglected. Distribution of information pamphlets describing the radiation oncology program and the nature of radiation oncology practice is also suggested as an efficient means of informing medical students.
PubMed ID
6480666 View in PubMed
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Advanced cardiac life support: a survey of interprofessional attitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233123
Source
Heart Lung. 1988 May;17(3):254-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1988
Author
R W Swanson
V R Ramsden
Author Affiliation
Advanced Cardiac Life Support Sub-Committee, Canadian Heart Foundation, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.
Source
Heart Lung. 1988 May;17(3):254-5
Date
May-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Education, Medical, Continuing - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Life Support Care - education
Questionnaires
Resuscitation - education
Saskatchewan
Abstract
A questionnaire survey was conducted of physicians and nurses who had participated in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS)-Provider courses during a 5-year period. Both physicians and nurses believed that a conjoint physician-nurse ACLS-Provider course was a good learning experience and an excellent exercise in interprofessional communication. On the basis of these data, we suggest that a conjoint ACLS-Provider course be maintained, rather than establishing different modules for different professions.
PubMed ID
3366594 View in PubMed
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[Doctors in training for general practice profit from being employed in both orthopaedic and general surgery wards].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271891
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2013 Sep 16;175(38):2189-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-16-2013
Author
Signe Gjedde Brøndt
Niels Frølich
Peder Charles
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2013 Sep 16;175(38):2189-91
Date
Sep-16-2013
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Denmark
Education, Medical, Graduate - organization & administration
General Practice - education
General Surgery - education
Humans
Orthopedics - education
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
In the statement of aims of the education for general practice in Denmark competences in orthopaedic as well as in internal general surgery are specified by the Danish Health and Medicines Authority. In the period 2008-2010 there were three different types of employment for the assessment of competences in surgery. We found that doctors in training who had been employed in both orthopaedic and general surgery wards to a greater extent felt confident about their required competences in orthopaedic surgery. A majority of the 27 doctors participating in this survey felt that this kind of employment would be the best way to ensure the achievement of surgical competences.
PubMed ID
24044540 View in PubMed
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Rehabilitation professionals' satisfaction with continuing education delivered at a distance using different technologies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177195
Source
Assist Technol. 2004;16(2):104-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Lili Liu
Albert Cook
Stanley Varnhagen
Masako Miyazaki
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
Assist Technol. 2004;16(2):104-15
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Data Collection
Education, Continuing - methods
Education, Distance - standards
Educational Technology - standards
Focus Groups
Humans
Internet
Learning
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Rehabilitation - education
Abstract
This paper examines learner satisfaction with technologies used for distance delivery of continuing education across 10 Canadian sites: nine within the province of Alberta and one in Nunavut Territory. The technologies were satellite (or videotapes of) broadcasts, videoconferencing, and web-based technology. Learner satisfaction was evaluated using questionnaires. A survey on general issues related to continuing education was developed and mailed to random samples of health professionals and a convenience sample of stakeholders. The learners (n = 1,141) represented 20 types of health service providers who had attended at least one session delivered via satellite, videotape, or videoconferencing. Seven individuals completed the web-based course. Overall, the majority of participants were satisfied or very satisfied. In general, satellite delivery was received more favorably compared with videotapes of the same content. A total of 350 (33% response rate) health professionals and 37 (50% response rate) stakeholders returned the surveys. Nearly 50% of health professionals thought that clinical case presentations (rounds) were valuable to them, but over half of the stakeholders perceived that videotapes, rounds, and research seminars were valuable to health professionals. Ratings for the web-based course varied, indicating different learner characteristics. We conclude that it is possible to utilize multiple technologies to meet the continuing education needs of an interdisciplinary group of health service providers, but future research is needed to develop a framework for evaluating the usability of multiple existing and emerging technologies for distance education.
PubMed ID
15566043 View in PubMed
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Which factors are associated with trainees' confidence in performing obstetric and gynecological ultrasound examinations?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259148
Source
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Apr;43(4):444-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
M G Tolsgaard
M B Rasmussen
C. Tappert
M. Sundler
J L Sorensen
B. Ottesen
C. Ringsted
A. Tabor
Source
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Apr;43(4):444-51
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Education, Medical, Continuing
Education, Medical, Graduate
Female
Gynecology - education - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Obstetrics - education - standards
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Sweden
Ultrasonics - education - standards
Abstract
To explore the association between clinical training characteristics and trainees' level of confidence in performing ultrasound scans independently.
A cross-sectional e-survey was distributed to members of the national societies of junior obstetricians/gynecologists in Denmark, Sweden and Norway (n = 973). Multiple linear regression models were used to explore the effect that amount of time spent in specialized ultrasound units and clinical experience had on trainees' confidence in performing ultrasonography independently. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify factors that contributed to trainees' confidence in performing ultrasonography. Trainees' ultrasound confidence was finally compared with their expected levels of performance.
Of the 682 respondents (response rate 70.1%), 621 met the inclusion criteria. Clinical experience and time spent in specialized ultrasound units were predictors of trainees' confidence in performing ultrasonography independently (P
Notes
Comment In: Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Apr;43(4):363-424692220
PubMed ID
24105723 View in PubMed
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1756 records – page 1 of 176.