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41 records – page 1 of 5.

Building Blocks: the next steps for supporting Alaska's young children and their families

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76031
Date
2000
  1 website  
Author
State of Alaska: Department of Health & Social Services
Author Affiliation
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Date
2000
Keywords
Alaska; children; maternal and child health; prenatal healthcare; child care and education; Alaska education programs
Abstract
This pamphlet is dedicated to improving the health and well-being of Alaska's young children, prenatal through age 8, by creating a comprehensive, collaborative initiative to ensure our collective energies address the critical outcomes and strategies that will support and improve the lives of Alaska's children and families and also that will help us gauge our progress. This booklet articulates many of the challenges faced by children and their families today and identifies outcomes and strategies which, if accomplished, could significantly improve the lives of many children.
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Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Website
Keywords
Polar regions
Research
Education
Abstract
PEI is a vibrant network promoting polar education and research to a global community. By fostering dialogue and collaboration between educators and researchers, PEI aims to highlight and share the global relevance of the polar regions with the broader community.
Online Resources
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Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Language
English
Russian
Publication Type
Website
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Education
Research
Abstract
The University of the Arctic (UArctic) is a cooperative network of universities, colleges, research institutes and other organizations concerned with education and research in and about the North. UArctic builds and strengthens collective resources and collaborative infrastructure that enables member institutions to better serve their constituents and their regions. Through cooperation in education, research and outreach we enhance human capacity in the North, promote viable communities and sustainable economies, and forge global partnerships.
Notes
The UArctic magazine Shared Voices is printed annually.
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Source
Government of Greenland. Ministry of Nature, Environment and Research.
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Source
Government of Greenland. Ministry of Nature, Environment and Research.
Language
English
Danish
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Website
Keywords
Climate change
Adaptation
Indigenous peoples
Education
Industry
Abstract
Climategreenland is the Government of Greenland’s website about climate change in Greenland. The site is intended to be a resource to help you find the people, the organisations or the information you are looking for. It also provides an overview of some of the ways in which Greenland is affected by a changing climate and how this is dealt with.
The site approaches climate change from a multidimensional perspective and hence includes knowledge and actors from a wide range of professional disciplines and backgrounds. In addition to presenting information about current climate research in Greenland, the site provides insight into Greenland’s past and present greenhouse gas emissions and its role in different international forums. Finally, you can find information about climate adaptation and some of the opportunities that arise with a changing climate.
The site is structured around four main themes (citizen, municipality, industry, education) each providing information and links to central actors in the field. The focal point is climate change in a Greenlandic context. As a result, the site does not provide general information about climate change or about Greenland, apart from what is indirectly or directly related to climate change and its effects.
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Medical education and research: the foundations of quality health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102887
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Apr 9;94(15):795-9.
Publication Type
Article
Date
9 Apr 1966
  1 website  
Author
Mustard JF
Laidlaw JC
Godden JO
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Apr 9;94(15):795-9.
Date
9 Apr 1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical
Humans
Public Health
Research
Abstract
In May 1964 the Royal Commission on Health Services declared that "health research is essential to health progress". However, since that time the means of providing adequate health care have received far less attention than have methods of payment for physicians' services. Because medical education and research is the source from which all other health benefits flow, urgent attention must be paid to the adequate support of teacher-scientists, as set forth in the Woods, Gordon (Gundy) report. It is the numbers and quality of these men and women, more than any other factor, that will determine the shape of medical science and, hence, medical practice in Canada in the future. Expensive as it is, Canadian medicine and Canadian medical scientists must have generous support if medical care in this country is to be of high quality.
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Medical education and research: the foundations of quality health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102888
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Apr 9;94(15):795-9.
Publication Type
Article
Date
9 Apr 1966
  1 website  
Author
Mustard JF
Laidlaw JC
Godden JO
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Apr 9;94(15):795-9.
Date
9 Apr 1966
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical
Humans
Public Health
Research
Abstract
In May 1964 the Royal Commission on Health Services declared that "health research is essential to health progress". However, since that time the means of providing adequate health care have received far less attention than have methods of payment for physicians' services. Because medical education and research is the source from which all other health benefits flow, urgent attention must be paid to the adequate support of teacher-scientists, as set forth in the Woods, Gordon (Gundy) report. It is the numbers and quality of these men and women, more than any other factor, that will determine the shape of medical science and, hence, medical practice in Canada in the future. Expensive as it is, Canadian medicine and Canadian medical scientists must have generous support if medical care in this country is to be of high quality.
Online Resources
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Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Website
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Habitations
Research facilities
Education
Logistics
Abstract
Isaaffik is the Greenlandic word for gateway. Isaaffik Arctic Gateway is a user driven web platform supporting research and collaboration. Anyone engaged with Arctic research, education, infrastructure, and logistics may join Isaaffik.
Notes
Website includes upcoming events concerning Arctic research, logistics and education.
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Source
WWF (World Wildlife Federation).
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Source
WWF (World Wildlife Federation).
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Website
Keywords
Conservation
Ecology
Education
Protection
Environment
Barents
Kamchatka
Notes
Includes Arctic, Kamchatka and Barents
Online Resources
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ARCUS : Arctic Research Consortium of the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301436
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Language
English
Publication Type
Website
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Research
Education
Indigenous peoples
Traditional knowldge
Exploration
Abstract
The Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS) has been connecting Arctic research since 1988. ARCUS achieves our Vision and serves our Mission through the four Goals of networking, communications, education, and research community support & facilitation. Guided by our Values, we connect Arctic research across the boundaries of organizations, disciplines, geographies, sectors, knowledge systems, and cultures. Based in the United States, ARCUS serves a globally connected, diverse Arctic research community, with an emphasis on connecting U.S. researchers. We are supported by government agencies, foundations, and others who share our enthusiasm for connected Arctic research.
The Arctic research community advances understanding of the Arctic through science, Indigenous knowledge, technology, and education. ARCUS promotes the application of this knowledge to Arctic and global challenges, and helps the research community to address questions that require the collaborative skills and resources of scientists, engineers, educators, Indigenous knowledge holders, and others. To further advance a holistic understanding of the Arctic, ARCUS works collaboratively with other boundary-crossing organizations with shared goals and objectives, such as the U.S. Arctic Research Commission (USARC), the Polar Research Board (PRB), the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC), the Arctic Institute of North America (AINA), the European Polar Board (EPB), the Arctic Council, the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS), the University of the Arctic (UArctic), and Polar Educators International (PEI).
It is the intent of ARCUS to enhance the engagement of Arctic Indigenous communities, organizations, and peoples in research, recognizing that much research occurs within Indigenous communities, on their land, and/or utilizes Indigenous knowledge; that Indigenous Knowledge holds its own methodologies, validation, and evaluation processes; the need for Indigenous community-driven research; and that Indigenous communities are a vital part of the ‘research community’. We will focus on institutionalizing intersectional engagement with a clear focus and extra effort. We also will be applying knowledge of the ethical ways of engaging this marginalized community and respectful language.
Notes
Website includes access to numerous reports.
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Continuing medical education and burnout among Danish GPs

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86833
Source
British Journal of General Practice. 2008 Jan;58(546):15-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
  1 website  
Author
Brøndt, A
Sokolowski, I
Olesen, F
Vedsted, P
Author Affiliation
University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark. a.broendt@alm.au.dk
Source
British Journal of General Practice. 2008 Jan;58(546):15-19
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Education, Medical, Continuing
Family Practice - education - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physicians, Family - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There has been minimal research into continuing medical education (CME) and its association with burnout among GPs. AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between participating in CME and experiencing burnout in a sample of Danish GPs. DESIGN OF STUDY: Cross-sectional questionnaire study. SETTING: All 458 active GPs in 2004, in the County of Aarhus, Denmark were invited to participate. METHOD: Data on CME activities were obtained for all GPs and linked to burnout which was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory--Human Services Survey. The relationship between CME activity and burnout was calculated as prevalence ratios (PR) in a generalised linear model. RESULTS: In total, 379 (83.5%) GPs returned the questionnaire. The prevalence of burnout was about 25%, and almost 3% suffered from 'high burnout'. A total of 344 (92.0%) GPs were members of a CME group or a supervision group. Not being a member of either a CME group or a supervision group was statistically significantly associated with doubled likelihood of burnout (PR = 2.2). Among GPs not making use of a practice facilitator, a seven-fold higher likelihood of high burnout was found. CONCLUSION: GPs who were not members of a CME group and did not take part in outreach visits had a higher likelihood of suffering from burnout and high burnout than those who were members of a CME group or received outreach visits. Therefore, not being a member of a CME group could indicate that the GP is more likely to suffer from burnout. Although the present study does not unequivocally establish causality, it would be interesting to see whether staying active in CME may also prevent burnout among GPs.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Gen Pract. 2008 Jan;58(546):5-618186988
PubMed ID
18186991 View in PubMed
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41 records – page 1 of 5.