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Building Blocks: the next steps for supporting Alaska's young children and their families

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76031
Date
2000
  1 website  
Author
State of Alaska: Department of Health & Social Services
Author Affiliation
Alaska Department of Education & Early Development
Date
2000
Keywords
Alaska; children; maternal and child health; prenatal healthcare; child care and education; Alaska education programs
Abstract
This pamphlet is dedicated to improving the health and well-being of Alaska's young children, prenatal through age 8, by creating a comprehensive, collaborative initiative to ensure our collective energies address the critical outcomes and strategies that will support and improve the lives of Alaska's children and families and also that will help us gauge our progress. This booklet articulates many of the challenges faced by children and their families today and identifies outcomes and strategies which, if accomplished, could significantly improve the lives of many children.
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Medical education and research: the foundations of quality health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102887
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Apr 9;94(15):795-9.
Publication Type
Article
Date
9 Apr 1966
  1 website  
Author
Mustard JF
Laidlaw JC
Godden JO
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Apr 9;94(15):795-9.
Date
9 Apr 1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical
Humans
Public Health
Research
Abstract
In May 1964 the Royal Commission on Health Services declared that "health research is essential to health progress". However, since that time the means of providing adequate health care have received far less attention than have methods of payment for physicians' services. Because medical education and research is the source from which all other health benefits flow, urgent attention must be paid to the adequate support of teacher-scientists, as set forth in the Woods, Gordon (Gundy) report. It is the numbers and quality of these men and women, more than any other factor, that will determine the shape of medical science and, hence, medical practice in Canada in the future. Expensive as it is, Canadian medicine and Canadian medical scientists must have generous support if medical care in this country is to be of high quality.
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Medical education and research: the foundations of quality health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102888
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Apr 9;94(15):795-9.
Publication Type
Article
Date
9 Apr 1966
  1 website  
Author
Mustard JF
Laidlaw JC
Godden JO
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Apr 9;94(15):795-9.
Date
9 Apr 1966
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical
Humans
Public Health
Research
Abstract
In May 1964 the Royal Commission on Health Services declared that "health research is essential to health progress". However, since that time the means of providing adequate health care have received far less attention than have methods of payment for physicians' services. Because medical education and research is the source from which all other health benefits flow, urgent attention must be paid to the adequate support of teacher-scientists, as set forth in the Woods, Gordon (Gundy) report. It is the numbers and quality of these men and women, more than any other factor, that will determine the shape of medical science and, hence, medical practice in Canada in the future. Expensive as it is, Canadian medicine and Canadian medical scientists must have generous support if medical care in this country is to be of high quality.
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Continuing medical education and burnout among Danish GPs

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86833
Source
British Journal of General Practice. 2008 Jan;58(546):15-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
  1 website  
Author
Brøndt, A
Sokolowski, I
Olesen, F
Vedsted, P
Author Affiliation
University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark. a.broendt@alm.au.dk
Source
British Journal of General Practice. 2008 Jan;58(546):15-19
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Education, Medical, Continuing
Family Practice - education - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physicians, Family - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There has been minimal research into continuing medical education (CME) and its association with burnout among GPs. AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between participating in CME and experiencing burnout in a sample of Danish GPs. DESIGN OF STUDY: Cross-sectional questionnaire study. SETTING: All 458 active GPs in 2004, in the County of Aarhus, Denmark were invited to participate. METHOD: Data on CME activities were obtained for all GPs and linked to burnout which was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory--Human Services Survey. The relationship between CME activity and burnout was calculated as prevalence ratios (PR) in a generalised linear model. RESULTS: In total, 379 (83.5%) GPs returned the questionnaire. The prevalence of burnout was about 25%, and almost 3% suffered from 'high burnout'. A total of 344 (92.0%) GPs were members of a CME group or a supervision group. Not being a member of either a CME group or a supervision group was statistically significantly associated with doubled likelihood of burnout (PR = 2.2). Among GPs not making use of a practice facilitator, a seven-fold higher likelihood of high burnout was found. CONCLUSION: GPs who were not members of a CME group and did not take part in outreach visits had a higher likelihood of suffering from burnout and high burnout than those who were members of a CME group or received outreach visits. Therefore, not being a member of a CME group could indicate that the GP is more likely to suffer from burnout. Although the present study does not unequivocally establish causality, it would be interesting to see whether staying active in CME may also prevent burnout among GPs.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Gen Pract. 2008 Jan;58(546):5-618186988
PubMed ID
18186991 View in PubMed
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A comparative study on the utility of telehealth in the provision of rheumatology services to rural and northern communities

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99499
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Dec;63(4):415-421
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
  1 website  
Author
Jong, M
Kraishi, M
Author Affiliation
Memorial University of Newfoundland, Labrador Health Center, Canada
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Dec;63(4):415-421
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education
Labrador
Newfoundland
Rheumatology
Rural and northern communities
Telehealth
Videoconsultation
Abstract
There is a critical shortage of specialty rheumatology services in Canada. The impact is felt more in rural and northern regions than in urban areas of the country. In response to the need, this study was conducted to compare the satisfaction of referring physicians with rheumatology services through conventional visiting specialty clinics; email consults and regularly scheduled videoconference. RESULTS: Physicians responded positively to all methods of rheumatology service provision. The videoconference group were the most positive. The reasons were: immediate feedback to referring physician and patient, effective case based learning and transfer of knowledge, and improved accessibility. CONCLUSION: Videoconference is preferred to visiting clinics and email as a method for rheumatology services to rural/northern communities. It is cost effective and there is knowledge transfer between the rheumatologist and the referring physicians.
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Special section: Indigenous peoples: Promoting psychological healing and well-being

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274315
Date
Aug-2010
  1 website  
Author
Office of Ethnic Minority Affairs, American Psychological Association
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Keywords
Beliefs
Cultural competence
Education
Indigenous peoples
Mental health
Spirituality
Traditional healing
Abstract
Collectively, these articles are broad in scope, describing a panorama of indigenous cultures throughout the Americas and the Caribbean and their approaches to healing and well-being. Among the indigenous groups addressed are Alaska Natives, American Indians, Arawaks, Chamorros of Guam, First Nations people of Canada, Haitians, Latinos of Cuba, and others. Equally as varied are the specific topical foci of the articles. But what is most striking is the communality of themes and concerns across the various articles and cultural groups, and the differences between these communalities and major thematic concerns of Western (U.S.) psychology.
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The Norwegian food and nutritional policy

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62476
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1977 Jun;67(6):550-551
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1977
  1 website  
Author
Ringen, K
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1977 Jun;67(6):550-551
Date
Jun-1977
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Food-Processing Industry
Government Agencies
Health education
Humans
Norway
Nutrition
Nutritional Requirements
Abstract
The Ministry of Agriculture of Norway presented, in December 1975, a government white paper outlining a proposal for a comprehensive national food and nutritional policy. It is comprehensive in that it was developed in a cooperative effort between experts in agriculture and public health and it is promising in that it is the culmination of a long development of policy in the health and agricultural sectors. It is important because it is morethan a proposal; the continuous policy development has madeits overall intent politically acceptable and its implementationis not merely feasible, but likely.
PubMed ID
869088 View in PubMed
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AHELP: Alaska Health Education Library Project

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288377
Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Alaska Department of Health and Human Services
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Public Health
Alaska
Health education
Health promotion
Health Resources
Abstract
The Alaska Health Education Library Project (AHELP) is an electronic clearinghouse of current health promotion and health education resources that are specific to and available in Alaska.
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Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288390
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC)
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Public Health
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Health services
Health education
Abstract
The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium is a non-profit health organization owned and managed by Alaska Native tribal governments and their regional health organizations.
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Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
  1 website  
Author
Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Inc.
Date
2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child and family services
Community shared services
Educational services
Employment and training
Recovery services
Abstract
This is a comprehensive listing of opportunities provided by Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Inc., to their community. Each program represents a partnership among community members, staff, and other community-based organizations and funding agencies.
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43 records – page 1 of 5.