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My Journey: Development and Practice-Based Evidence of a Culturally Attuned Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program for Native Youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300906
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 02 06; 16(3):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
02-06-2019
Author
DenYelle Baete Kenyon
Tracey R McMahon
Anna Simonson
Char Green-Maximo
Ashley Schwab
Melissa Huff
Renee E Sieving
Author Affiliation
Behavioral Sciences, Sanford Research, Sioux Falls, SD 57104, USA. denyelle.kenyon@usd.edu.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 02 06; 16(3):
Date
02-06-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Child
Cultural Competency
Curriculum
Decision Making
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - education - psychology
Male
Minority Groups - education - psychology
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - ethnology - prevention & control
Self Efficacy
Sex education - methods
United States - ethnology
Abstract
A clear need exists for teen pregnancy prevention programs that are responsive to the specific needs and cultural contexts of Native American communities. Recent data indicates that the birth rate for Native teens is nearly two and a half times the rate for White teens (32.9 versus 13.2). To address this disparity, we conducted formative research with Northern Plains Native American community members, resulting in My Journey, a culturally attuned curriculum for 6?8th graders. My Journey is grounded in traditional values and teachings to promote self-efficacy in sexual health decision-making and engagement in prosocial behaviors. We conducted a pilot study with 6?8th grade students (n = 45), aged 11?14 years (22 females, 23 males). Pilot study findings confirm program feasibility and acceptability. The process evaluation revealed that teachers liked the curriculum, particularly its adaptability of cultural components and ease of student engagement. The outcome evaluation demonstrated that My Journey provided an avenue for NA youth to increase their sex refusal self-efficacy. Application of the culture cube framework revealed My Journey has made a meaningful practice-based evidence contribution as a community-defined, culturally integrated curriculum that is effective. Future directions include broader implementation of My Journey, including adaption for additional populations.
PubMed ID
30736271 View in PubMed
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Engaging Elements of Cancer-Related Digital Stories in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289851
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2016 09; 31(3):500-5
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
09-2016
Author
Melany Cueva
Regina Kuhnley
Laura Revels
Nancy E Schoenberg
Anne Lanier
Mark Dignan
Author Affiliation
Community Health Aide Program, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, 4000 Ambassador Dr., Anchorage, AK, 99508, USA. mcueva@anthc.org.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2016 09; 31(3):500-5
Date
09-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Communication
Community Health Workers - education
Female
Focus Groups
Health Behavior
Health Education - methods
Humans
Male
Medical Informatics - methods
Middle Aged
Narration
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
The tradition of storytelling is an integral part of Alaska Native cultures that continues to be a way of passing on knowledge. Using a story-based approach to share cancer education is grounded in Alaska Native traditions and people's experiences and has the potential to positively impact cancer knowledge, understandings, and wellness choices. Community health workers (CHWs) in Alaska created a personal digital story as part of a 5-day, in-person cancer education course. To identify engaging elements of digital stories among Alaska Native people, one focus group was held in each of three different Alaska communities with a total of 29 adult participants. After viewing CHWs' digital stories created during CHW cancer education courses, focus group participants commented verbally and in writing about cultural relevance, engaging elements, information learned, and intent to change health behavior. Digital stories were described by Alaska focus group participants as being culturally respectful, informational, inspiring, and motivational. Viewers shared that they liked digital stories because they were short (only 2-3 min); nondirective and not preachy; emotional, told as a personal story and not just facts and figures; and relevant, using photos that showed Alaskan places and people.
Notes
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Cites: J Cancer Surviv. 2008 Mar;2(1):33-44 PMID 18648985
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Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2013 Jul;14(4):617-23 PMID 23099660
PubMed ID
25865400 View in PubMed
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Smoking and Physical Inactivity as Predictors of Mobility Impairment During Late Life: Exploring Differential Vulnerability Across Education Level in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299965
Source
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2018 04 16; 73(4):675-683
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-16-2018
Author
Neda Agahi
Stefan Fors
Johan Fritzell
Benjamin A Shaw
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Sweden.
Source
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2018 04 16; 73(4):675-683
Date
04-16-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Educational Status
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Sedentary Behavior
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To test whether older adults from high and low educational groups are differentially vulnerable to the impact of smoking and physical inactivity on the progression of mobility impairment during old age.
A nationally representative sample of older Swedish adults (n = 1,311), aged 57-76 years at baseline (1991), were followed for up to 23 years (2014). Multilevel regression was used to estimate individual trajectories of mobility impairment over the study period and to test for differences in the progression of mobility impairment on the basis of smoking status, physical activity status, and level of education.
Compared to nonsmokers, heavy smokers had higher levels and steeper increases in mobility impairment with advancing age. However, there were only small and statistically nonsignificant differences in the impact of heavy smoking on mobility impairment in high versus low education groups. A similar pattern of results was found for physical inactivity.
Differential vulnerability to unhealthy behaviors may vary across populations, age, time-periods, and health outcomes. In this study of older adults in Sweden, low and high education groups did not differ significantly in their associations between heavy smoking or physical inactivity, and the progression of mobility impairment.
PubMed ID
27449220 View in PubMed
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