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The influence of generic substitution on the content of patient-pharmacist communication in Swedish community pharmacies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291060
Source
Int J Pharm Pract. 2017 Aug; 25(4):274-281
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Erika Olsson
Helle Wallach-Kildemoes
Ban Ahmed
Pontus Ingman
Susanne Kaae
Sofia Kälvemark Sporrong
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacy, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Int J Pharm Pract. 2017 Aug; 25(4):274-281
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Communication
Community Pharmacy Services - economics - organization & administration
Drug Substitution - economics - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Health Literacy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic
Pharmacists - psychology
Professional Role
Professional-Patient Relations
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
The objective was to study the relationship between the length and content of patient-pharmacist communication in community pharmacies, and generic substitution.
The study was conducted in six community pharmacies in Sweden. Non-participant observations with audio recordings and short structured interviews were conducted. Out of 32 pharmacists 29 agreed to participate (90.6%), as did 282 out of 407 patients (69.3%). Logistic regression analysis was applied to calculate odds ratio for occurrence of generic substitution. Linear regression (ß-coefficients) was applied to test for differences in time spent on different categories.
In encounters where generic substitution occurred more time (19.2 s) was spent on non-medical (for instance administrative or economical) issues (P = 0.01, 95% confidence interval 4.8-33.6). However, the total time of the encounter was not significantly longer. The amount of time spent on non-medical issues increased with age of patient (age 60+: ß, 33 s, P
PubMed ID
27531756 View in PubMed
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Contraceptive Choices and Counseling in Norwegian Female Renal Transplant Recipients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300023
Source
Transplant Proc. 2019 Mar; 51(2):470-474
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Date
Mar-2019
Author
I A Eide
F Rashidi
K Lønning
N B Oldereid
A V Reisæter
A Åsberg
K Midtvedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Renal Medicine, Akershus University Hospital, Norway. Electronic address: Ivar.Anders.Eide@ahus.no.
Source
Transplant Proc. 2019 Mar; 51(2):470-474
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Contraception
Counseling
Female
Fertility
Humans
Kidney Transplantation
Middle Aged
Norway
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Sexual Behavior
Transplant Recipients - education
Young Adult
Abstract
There are major gaps in the understanding of sexual and reproductive health in female renal transplant recipients.
In this Norwegian multicenter retrospective observational study, 118 female renal transplant recipients aged 22 to 49 years responded to a questionnaire on fertility, contraceptive use, and pregnancy.
More than one-third (37%) of patients reported that they did not receive advice on contraceptive methods from health care personnel in the early post-transplant phase. These women used effective contraceptive methods less often. Nearly half of the patients (45%) reported that they had not received any advice on timing of conception after transplant. From 95 pregnancies after renal transplant, 52 (55%) resulted in live births.
Counseling on contraceptive methods should be part of standard care in conjunction with transplantation. More than one-third of young female renal transplant recipients of reproductive age could not recall having received advice from health care personnel about contraceptive use, and nearly half of the patients did not receive preconceptional advice after transplant. Although the current study does not discriminate between lack of advice and recall bias, the findings signal the need for improved counseling on female sexual and reproductive health after renal transplant.
PubMed ID
30879570 View in PubMed
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Childhood Obesity, Obesity Treatment Outcome, and Achieved Education: A Prospective Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292114
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2017 Oct; 61(4):508-513
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Emilia Hagman
Pernilla Danielsson
Lena Brandt
Viktoria Svensson
Anders Ekbom
Claude Marcus
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: emilia.hagman@ki.se.
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2017 Oct; 61(4):508-513
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Causality
Child
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Pediatric Obesity - classification - psychology - therapy
Prospective Studies
Registries
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Childhood obesity represents a social burden. This study aims to investigate whether achieved educational level differs in young adults who have suffered obesity in childhood compared with the general population and to determine how obesity treatment influences achieved educational level.
This prospective cohort study includes subjects from the Swedish Childhood Obesity Treatment Registry (BORIS, n = 1,465) who were followed up after 20 years of age. They were compared with a randomly selected matched population-based group (n = 6,979). Achieved educational level was defined as =12 years in school (completers). Covariates include sex, migration background, and attention deficit disorders for both groups. Furthermore, age and degree of obesity at start of obesity treatment, treatment duration, and efficacy were analyzed in the obese cohort.
In the obese cohort, 55.4% were school completers, compared with 76.2% in the comparison group (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = .42, p
PubMed ID
28693958 View in PubMed
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Increased survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest when off duty medically educated personnel perform CPR compared with laymen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292367
Source
Resuscitation. 2017 11; 120:88-94
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2017
Author
Anette Nord
Leif Svensson
Thomas Karlsson
Andreas Claesson
Johan Herlitz
Lennart Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Resuscitation. 2017 11; 120:88-94
Date
11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - education - mortality
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - mortality - therapy
Registries
Statistics, nonparametric
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Time-to-Treatment
Abstract
Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been proved to save lives; however, whether survival is affected by the training level of the bystander is not fully described.
To describe if the training level of laymen and medically educated bystanders affect 30-day survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA).
This observational study included all witnessed and treated cases of bystander CPR reported to the Swedish Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation between 2010 and 2014. Bystander CPR was divided into two categories: (a) lay-byCPR (non-medically educated) and (b) med-byCPR (off duty medically educated personnel).
During 2010-2014, 24,643 patients were reported to the OHCA registry, of which 6850 received lay-byCPR and 1444 med-byCPR; 16,349 crew-witnessed and non-witnessed cases and those with missing information were excluded from the analysis. The median interval from collapse to call for emergency medical services was 2min in both groups (p=0.97) and 2min from collapse to start of CPR for lay-byCPR versus 1min for med-byCPR (p
PubMed ID
28870719 View in PubMed
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