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Physiotherapy students' perceived stress, stressors, and reactions to stressors: A comparative study between Sweden and The Netherlands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294719
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2018 Apr; 34(4):293-300
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Audy-Paul Hodselmans
Elin Hemdal
Sophie Lundberg
Anna Bjarnegård
Hans Hobbelen
Ulla Svantesson
Author Affiliation
a Physical Therapy and Research group Healthy Ageing, Hanze University of Applied Sciences Groningen , Groningen , Netherlands.
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2018 Apr; 34(4):293-300
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Education, Professional - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Netherlands
Perception
Physical Therapy Modalities - education
Physical Therapy Specialty - education
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - psychology
Students, Health Occupations - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Universities
Abstract
Studies of healthcare students report increased levels of stress, with academic pressures being the greatest source. The objective of this study was to examine the differences in the overall stress level, stressors, and reactions to stressors between physiotherapy students at the University of Gothenburg (GU) and those at the Hanze University of Applied Sciences (HUAS).
The Student-life Stress Inventory was used. The participants (n = 116) included physiotherapy students at GU and HUAS. The distribution of the questionnaire occurred during a regular lecture or in a lecture that was scheduled particularly for its distribution.
At GU, 13.7% of the students rated their level of stress as mild, whereas 72.5% of them rated it as moderate. The corresponding values for HUAS students were 43.9% and 43.9%, respectively. This difference between two universities was significant (p = 0.006). The total score of the subcategories indicated that the students at GU reported significantly higher levels of stressors (p = 0.027) and reactions to stressors (p = 0.003). However, there were no significant differences in the male participants between the universities.
Female students in their three-year educational program in Sweden experienced significantly more stress than Dutch female students in their four-year educational program.
PubMed ID
29068746 View in PubMed
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The Course of Self-Efficacy for Therapeutic Use of Self in Norwegian Occupational Therapy Students: A 10-Month Follow-Up Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294976
Source
Occup Ther Int. 2018; 2018:2962747
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
2018
Author
Kathrin Schwank
Tove Carstensen
Farzaneh Yazdani
Tore Bonsaksen
Author Affiliation
Europäische Fachhochschule, Rostock, Germany.
Source
Occup Ther Int. 2018; 2018:2962747
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Occupational Therapy - education
Self Efficacy
Students
Surveys and Questionnaires
Universities
Young Adult
Abstract
Occupational therapy students need to develop self-efficacy for managing the therapeutic relationship in practice. This study examined the 10-month trajectories of Norwegian students' self-efficacy for use of self.
Eighty-nine students completed self-efficacy questionnaires related to the use of self after a workshop and at 3- and 10-month follow-up. Changes on the three outcome measures (self-efficacy for therapeutic mode use, for recognizing clients' interpersonal characteristics, and for managing interpersonal events) were analyzed with repeated measures ANOVA.
Across the follow-up period, the students improved their self-efficacy for therapeutic mode use (partial ?2 = 0.44, p
Notes
Cites: Scand J Occup Ther. 2012 Jan;19(1):42-8 PMID 21073369
Cites: Scand J Occup Ther. 2017 Apr 14;:1-6 PMID 28407724
Cites: Psychol Rev. 1977 Mar;84(2):191-215 PMID 847061
PubMed ID
29805333 View in PubMed
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Qualitative interviews with healthcare staff in four European countries to inform adaptation of an intervention to increase chlamydia testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292096
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Sep 25; 7(9):e017528
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Sep-25-2017
Author
Cliodna McNulty
Ellie J Ricketts
Hans Fredlund
Anneli Uusküla
Katy Town
Claire Rugman
Anna Tisler-Sala
Alix Mani
Brigitte Dunais
Kate Folkard
Rosalie Allison
Pia Touboul
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Public Health, Primary Care Unit, Gloucestershire Royal Hospital, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, UK.
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Sep 25; 7(9):e017528
Date
Sep-25-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis - prevention & control
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
England
Estonia
Female
France
General Practice - economics - education - organization & administration
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mass Screening - economics
Needs Assessment
Primary Health Care - economics - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Reproductive Health Services - organization & administration
Sexual Health - education
Stakeholder participation
Sweden
Time Factors
Workload
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine the needs of primary healthcare general practice (GP) staff, stakeholders and trainers to inform the adaptation of a locally successful complex intervention (Chlamydia Intervention Randomised Trial (CIRT)) aimed at increasing chlamydia testing within primary healthcare within South West England to three EU countries (Estonia, France and Sweden) and throughout England.
Qualitative interviews.
European primary healthcare in England, France, Sweden and Estonia with a range of chlamydia screening provision in 2013.
45 GP staff, 13 trainers and 18 stakeholders.
The iterative interview schedule explored participants' personal attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural controls around provision of chlamydia testing, sexual health services and training in general practice. Researchers used a common thematic analysis.
Findings were similar across all countries. Most participants agreed that chlamydia testing and sexual health services should be offered in general practice. There was no culture of GP staff routinely offering opportunistic chlamydia testing or sexual health advice, and due to other priorities, participants reported this would be challenging. All participants indicated that the CIRT workshop covering chlamydia testing and sexual health would be useful if practice based, included all practice staff and action planning, and was adequately resourced. Participants suggested minor adaptations to CIRT to suit their country's health services.
A common complex intervention can be adapted for use across Europe, despite varied sexual health provision. The intervention (ChlamydiA Testing Training in Europe (CATTE)) should comprise: a staff workshop covering sexual health and chlamydia testing rates and procedures, action planning and patient materials and staff reminders via computer prompts, emails or newsletters, with testing feedback through practice champions. CATTE materials are available at: www.STItraining.eu.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28951413 View in PubMed
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Contraceptive Choices and Counseling in Norwegian Female Renal Transplant Recipients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300023
Source
Transplant Proc. 2019 Mar; 51(2):470-474
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Date
Mar-2019
Author
I A Eide
F Rashidi
K Lønning
N B Oldereid
A V Reisæter
A Åsberg
K Midtvedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Renal Medicine, Akershus University Hospital, Norway. Electronic address: Ivar.Anders.Eide@ahus.no.
Source
Transplant Proc. 2019 Mar; 51(2):470-474
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Contraception
Counseling
Female
Fertility
Humans
Kidney Transplantation
Middle Aged
Norway
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Sexual Behavior
Transplant Recipients - education
Young Adult
Abstract
There are major gaps in the understanding of sexual and reproductive health in female renal transplant recipients.
In this Norwegian multicenter retrospective observational study, 118 female renal transplant recipients aged 22 to 49 years responded to a questionnaire on fertility, contraceptive use, and pregnancy.
More than one-third (37%) of patients reported that they did not receive advice on contraceptive methods from health care personnel in the early post-transplant phase. These women used effective contraceptive methods less often. Nearly half of the patients (45%) reported that they had not received any advice on timing of conception after transplant. From 95 pregnancies after renal transplant, 52 (55%) resulted in live births.
Counseling on contraceptive methods should be part of standard care in conjunction with transplantation. More than one-third of young female renal transplant recipients of reproductive age could not recall having received advice from health care personnel about contraceptive use, and nearly half of the patients did not receive preconceptional advice after transplant. Although the current study does not discriminate between lack of advice and recall bias, the findings signal the need for improved counseling on female sexual and reproductive health after renal transplant.
PubMed ID
30879570 View in PubMed
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The health-related quality of life of patients with prostate cancer and their spouses before treatment compared with the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291745
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2017 Oct; 23(5):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Eeva Harju
Anja Rantanen
Marja Kaunonen
Mika Helminen
Taina Isotalo
Päivi Åstedt-Kurki
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Sciences, Nursing Science, University of Tampere, Finland.
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2017 Oct; 23(5):
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Neoplasms - psychology
Quality of Life
Spouses - psychology
Abstract
To describe the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients with prostate cancer and their spouses in comparison with the Finnish general population, using the RAND 36-Item Health Survey. An additional purpose was to describe the associations between the background variables of the participants and their HRQOL.
The HRQOL of patients with prostate cancer and especially their spouses at the time of diagnosis is not well known.
A cross-sectional study.
Responses were received from 232 patients and 229 spouses at 5 central hospitals in Finland between October 2013 and January 2016.
Compared to the Finnish general population mean, the HRQOL of the patients and their spouses was, on average, better for all dimensions. Patients' age, the presence of disease, and the treatment method were associated with the dimensions of HRQOL. The dimensions of HRQOL were also associated with spouses' age, basic and vocational education, and the presence of disease.
The patients and their spouses experienced their HRQOL as very similar; however, on average, it is better than the general population mean. However, the evidence suggests that support from the nurses should focus on emotional well-being, the dimension that received the lowest scores in both groups.
PubMed ID
28691243 View in PubMed
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Wrong-patient incidents during medication administrations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293062
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2018 Feb; 27(3-4):715-724
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Feb-2018
Author
Marja Härkänen
Maijaterttu Tiainen
Kaisa Haatainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2018 Feb; 27(3-4):715-724
Date
Feb-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Female
Finland
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medication Errors - nursing - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education
Patient Safety
Qualitative Research
Risk Management - methods
Workload
Abstract
To describe the factors pertaining to medication being administered to the wrong patient and to describe how patient identification is mentioned in wrong-patient incident reports.
Although patient identification has been given high priority to improve patient safety, patient misidentifications occur, and wrong-patient incidents are common.
A descriptive content analysis.
Incident reports related to medication administration (n = 1,012) were collected from two hospitals in Finland between 1 January 2013-31 December 2014. Of those, only incidents involving wrong-patient medication administration (n = 103) were included in this study.
Wrong-patient incidents occurred due for many reasons, including nurse-related factors (such as tiredness, a lack of skills or negligence) but also system-related factors (such as rushing or heavy workloads). In 77% (n = 79) of wrong-patient incident reports, the process of identifying of the patient was not described at all.
There is need to pay more attention to and increase training in correct identification processes to prevent wrong-patient incidents, and it is important to adjust system factors to support nurses.
Active patient identification procedures, double-checking and verification at each stage of the medication process should be implemented. More attention should also be paid to organisational factors, such as division of work, rushing and workload, as well as to correct communication. The active participation of nurses in handling incidents could increase risk awareness and facilitate useful protection actions.
PubMed ID
28815817 View in PubMed
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Care relationships at stake? Home healthcare professionals' experiences with digital medicine dispensers - a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294686
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 01 15; 18(1):26
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-15-2018
Author
Sigrid Nakrem
Marit Solbjør
Ida Nilstad Pettersen
Hanne Hestvik Kleiven
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. Sigrid.Nakrem@ntnu.no.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 01 15; 18(1):26
Date
01-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Attitude to Computers
Communication
Female
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Home Care Services - standards
Home Health Aides - psychology
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Telemedicine
Abstract
Although digital technologies can mitigate the burdens of home healthcare services caused by an ageing population that lives at home longer with complex health problems, research on the impacts and consequences of digitalised remote communication between patients and caregivers is lacking. The present study explores how home healthcare professionals had experienced the introduction of digital medicine dispensers and their influence on patient-caregiver relationships.
The multi-case study comprised semi-structured interviews with 21 healthcare professionals whose home healthcare service involved using the digital medicine dispensers. The constant comparative method was used for data analyses.
Altogether, interviewed healthcare professionals reported three main technology-related impacts upon their patient-caregiver relationships. First, national and local pressure to increase efficiency had troubled their relationships with patients who suspected that municipalities have sought to lower costs by reducing and digitalising services. Participants reported having to consider such worries when introducing technologies into their services. Second, participants reported a shift towards empowering patients. Digital technology can empower patients who value their independence, whereas safety is more important for other patients. Healthcare professionals needed to ensure that replacing care tasks with technology implies safe and improved care. Third, the safety and quality of digital healthcare services continues to depend upon surveillance and control mechanisms that compensate for less face-to-face monitoring. Participants did not consider the possibility that surveillance exposes information about patients' everyday lives to be problematic, but to constitute opportunities for adjusting services to meet patients' needs.
Technologies such as digital medicine dispensers can improve the efficiency of healthcare services and enhance patients' independence when introduced in a way that empowers patients as well as safeguards trust and service quality. Conversely, the patient-caregiver relationship can suffer if the technology does not meet patients' needs and fails to offer safe and trustworthy services. Upon introducing technology, home healthcare professionals therefore need to carefully consider the benefits and possible disadvantages of the technology. Ethical implications for both individuals and societies need to be further discussed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29334953 View in PubMed
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Body weight in adolescence and long-term risk of early heart failure in adulthood among men in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292410
Source
Eur Heart J. 2017 Jun 21; 38(24):1926-1933
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Jun-21-2017
Author
Annika Rosengren
Maria Åberg
Josefina Robertson
Margda Waern
Maria Schaufelberger
Georg Kuhn
David Åberg
Linus Schiöler
Kjell Torén
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Eur Heart J. 2017 Jun 21; 38(24):1926-1933
Date
Jun-21-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight
Educational Status
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Strength - physiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To study the relation between body mass index (BMI) in young men and risk of early hospitalization with heart failure.
In a prospective cohort study, men from the Swedish Conscript Registry investigated 1968-2005 (n = 1 610 437; mean age, 18.6 years were followed 5-42 years (median, 23.0 years; interquartile range, 15.0-32.0), 5492 first hospitalizations for heart failure occurred (mean age at diagnosis, 46.6 (SD 8.0) years). Compared with men with a body mass index (BMI) of 18.5-20.0 kg/m2, men with a BMI 20.0-22.5 kg/m2 had an hazard ratio (HR) of 1.22 (95% CI, 1.10-1.35), after adjustment for age, year of conscription, comorbidities at baseline, parental education, blood pressure, IQ, muscle strength, and fitness. The risk rose incrementally with increasing BMI such that men with a BMI of 30-35 kg/m2 had an adjusted HR of 6.47 (95% CI, 5.39-7.77) and those with a BMI of =35 kg/m2 had an HR of 9.21 (95% CI, 6.57-12.92). The multiple-adjusted risk of heart failure per 1 unit increase in BMI ranged from 1.06 (95% CI, 1.02-1.11) in heart failure associated with valvular disease to 1.20 (95% CI, 1.18-1.22) for cases associated with coronary heart disease, diabetes, or hypertension.
We found a steeply rising risk of early heart failure detectable already at a normal body weight, increasing nearly 10-fold in the highest weight category. Given the current obesity epidemic, heart failure in the young may increase substantially in the future and physicians need to be aware of this.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27311731 View in PubMed
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Time Trends and Educational Inequalities in Out-of-Hospital Coronary Deaths in Norway 1995-2009: A Cardiovascular Disease in Norway (CVDNOR) Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290093
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2017 Feb 20; 6(2):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Feb-20-2017
Author
Enxhela Sulo
Ottar Nygård
Stein Emil Vollset
Jannicke Igland
Marta Ebbing
Truls Østbye
Torben Jørgensen
Gerhard Sulo
Grethe S Tell
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Norway enxhela.sulo@uib.no.
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2017 Feb 20; 6(2):
Date
Feb-20-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Educational Status
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - epidemiology
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Abstract
Recent time trends and educational gradients characterizing out-of-hospital coronary deaths (OHCD) are poorly described.
We identified all deaths from coronary heart disease occurring outside the hospital in Norway during 1995 to 2009. Time trends were explored using Poisson regression analysis with year as the independent, continuous variable. Information on the highest achieved education was obtained from The National Education Database and classified as primary (up to 10 years of compulsory education), secondary (high school or vocational school), or tertiary (college/university). Educational gradients in OHCD were explored using Poisson regression, stratified by sex and age (
Notes
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PubMed ID
28219924 View in PubMed
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The influence of personality traits on perception of pain in older adults - Findings from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care - Blekinge study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295474
Source
Scand J Pain. 2015 Apr 01; 7(1):3-8
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
Apr-01-2015
Author
Lena Sandin Wranker
Mikael Rennemark
Sölve Elmståhl
Johan Berglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Health, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Pain. 2015 Apr 01; 7(1):3-8
Date
Apr-01-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Pain Perception
Personality
Personality Inventory
Sex Factors
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Background and aims The experience of pain may vary in accordance with personality traits and individual characteristics. Neuroticism is demonstrated to constitute a vulnerability factor among younger and middle-aged pain patients. The combination of openness and neuroticism is associated with high anxiety/depression scores among adult individuals with chronic conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate possible associations between pain and the personality dimensions of neuroticism, extroversion, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness among persons aged 60 years and older. An additional aim was to explore whether such associations are equally gender expressed. Methods The Swedish National Study on Aging and Care includes a randomly selected sample from the National Population Register. The data collection was conducted at four research centres and was approved by the Ethics Committees of Lund University and the Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. The Blekinge sample includes 1402 individuals, aged 60-96 years, of whom 769 (55%) reported pain. A total of 2312 individuals had been invited to participate. The reason for non-participation was registered. Participants underwent medical examination and testing by research personnel, conducted in two sessions, each of which lasted about 3 h. A questionnaire was completed between the two sessions. Pain was self-reported and based on the question: Have you had ache/pain during the last 4 weeks? Information on personality traits was obtained by means of the personality SGC1 questionnaire; a 60-item Swedish version of Costa & McCrae's FFM questionnaire. Personality traits were then tested based on gender by means of multivariate forward logistic regression in models adjusted for age, insomnia, financial status and educational level. Results When adjusting for covariates among women, neuroticism had a small but significant odds ratio of experiencing pain (OR 1.05, CI 1.02-1.08). Insomnia had the highest odds ratio (OR 2.19, CI 1.52-3.15) followed by low education (OR 1.59, CI 1.07-2.36), while belonging to the younger part of the older adult cohort was also associated with pain (OR 1.02, CI 1.005-1.04). In men, neuroticism (OR 1.03, CI 1.002-1.06) followed by openness (OR 1.03 CI 1.001-1.07) had a small but significant odds ratio of experiencing pain. Insomnia had the highest odds ratio (OR 1.98, CI 1.24-3.15). Conclusions Personality traits and pain were related among the older adults but there were gender differences. The relationship between pain and neuroticism in women was about the same in strength as the relation between pain and neuroticism/openness in men. Both sexes suffer from insomnia. The relationship between personality traits and pain was only affected to a minor extent by insomnia. Implications There is a need to increase awareness of the impact of personality as well as to provide improved treatment for pain and insomnia in older people.
Notes
CommentIn: Scand J Pain. 2017 Dec 29;7(1):1-2 PMID 29911593
PubMed ID
29911595 View in PubMed
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