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Source
Can Nurse. 2004 Oct;100(8):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Joan L Bottorff
Mary McCullum
Lynda G Balneaves
Mary Jane Esplen
June Carroll
Mary Kelly
Stephanie Kieffer
Author Affiliation
School oF Nursing, Nursing and Health Behaviour Research Unit, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
Can Nurse. 2004 Oct;100(8):24-8
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Nursing
Genetic Services - organization & administration
Genetics - education
Health planning
Humans
Nursing Services - organization & administration
PubMed ID
15626124 View in PubMed
Less detail

PORT--Psychosocial Oncology Research Training: a newly funded strategic initiative in health research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180189
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2004 Mar;36(1):159-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Carmen G Loiselle
Joan L Bottorff
Lorna Butler
Lesley F Degner
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Center for Nursing Research/Lady Davis Institute, SMBD-Jewish General Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2004 Mar;36(1):159-64
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Medical Oncology - education
Needs Assessment
Oncology Nursing - education
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Research - education - organization & administration
Research Support as Topic - organization & administration
Training Support - organization & administration
PubMed ID
15133925 View in PubMed
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The educational needs and professional roles of Canadian physicians and nurses regarding genetic testing and adult onset hereditary disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174516
Source
Community Genet. 2005;8(2):80-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Joan L Bottorff
Sean Blaine
June C Carroll
Mary Jane Esplen
Jane Evans
Mary Lou Nicolson Klimek
Wendy Meschino
Paul Ritvo
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Bottorff@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Community Genet. 2005;8(2):80-7
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Canada
Clinical Competence
Education, Medical
Education, Nursing
Education, Professional
Female
Genetic Counseling - methods
Genetic Diseases, Inborn - genetics - therapy
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Testing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nurse's Role
Physician's Role
Abstract
To investigate the knowledge, professional involvement and confidence of Canadian nurses and physicians in providing genetic services for adult onset hereditary disease.
1,425 physicians and 1,425 nurses received a mailed questionnaire with reminders. The response rates were 50% (n = 543) and 79% (n = 975), respectively.
Forty-eight percent of physicians and 31% of nurses lacked formal education in genetics. Respondents reported being involved in caring for people at risk for adult onset hereditary disease. Their levels of confidence that they could perform tasks, such as counselling about predictive genetic tests, however, were lower than their levels of expectation that it would be important for them to provide these services.
The expected roles and educational needs of Canadian nurses and physicians have broad areas of overlap suggesting the possibility of combined professional education programs and multiple ways of organizing teams to provide genetic services to people at risk for adult onset hereditary disease.
PubMed ID
15925883 View in PubMed
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Establishing roles in genetic nursing: interviews with Canadian nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170230
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Dec;37(4):96-115
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Joan L Bottorff
Mary McCullum
Lynda G Balneaves
Mary Jane Esplen
June Carroll
Mary Kelly
Stephanie Kieffer
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Social Development, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Dec;37(4):96-115
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Certification
Employment - organization & administration
Genetic Diseases, Inborn - diagnosis - therapy
Genetics, Medical - education - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Job Description
Mentors - psychology
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - organization & administration - psychology
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Professional Autonomy
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Isolation
Social Support
Societies, Nursing
Specialties, Nursing - education - organization & administration
Abstract
The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe nurses' roles in providing clinical genetic services related to adult onset hereditary disease and factors that influence genetic nursing practice in Canada. The study involved semi-structured telephone interviews with 22 nurses from 5 Canadian provinces with full-time or part-time roles in providing genetic services. The interviews included open-ended questions to elicit descriptions of genetic nursing roles and factors that support and limit opportunities in genetic nursing practice. Thematic analysis of the transcribed interviews revealed that, in addition to genetic counselling, the nurses reported a wide range of roles and responsibilities related to the provision of genetic services that drew directly on their nursing background (e.g., patient assessment, health promotion). Factors identified as supporting genetic nursing roles included nursing background, being part of a multidisciplinary team, and receiving mentorship. Challenges in establishing roles in genetic nursing were related to role ambiguity, lack of recognition of nursing expertise, limited availability of genetics education, isolation, and instability of nursing positions. Recommendations to support the development and expansion of genetic nursing practice were identified. A coordinated national effort among all stakeholders is needed to provide the resources necessary to support the appropriate and effective use of nursing expertise as genetics is integrated into the Canadian health-care system.
PubMed ID
16541821 View in PubMed
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Men's constructions of smoking in the context of women's tobacco reduction during pregnancy and postpartum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171170
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2006 Jun;62(12):3096-108
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Joan L Bottorff
John Oliffe
Cecilia Kalaw
Joanne Carey
Lawrence Mroz
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, Canada. joan.bottorff@ubc.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2006 Jun;62(12):3096-108
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Educational Status
Fathers - education - psychology
Female
Gender Identity
Health Behavior
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Behavior
Middle Aged
Paternal Behavior
Personal Satisfaction
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - psychology
Risk Reduction Behavior
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Smoking Cessation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Spouses - psychology
Abstract
Men's smoking is largely under-examined despite research that has consistently linked partner smoking to pregnant women's smoking and smoking relapse in the postpartum. An on-going qualitative study involving 31 couples in Canada exploring the influence of couple interactions on women's tobacco reduction provided the opportunity to examine men's smoking in the context of women's tobacco reduction or cessation during pregnancy and postpartum. Individual open-ended interviews with 20 men who smoked were conducted at 0-6 weeks following the birth of their infants and again at 16-24 weeks postpartum. Constant comparative methods were used along with social constructivist perspectives of fatherhood and gender to guide data analysis and enhance theoretical sensitivity. Four themes emerged in men's accounts of their tobacco use: (1) expressing masculinity through smoking, (2) reconciling smoking as a family man, (3) losing the freedom to smoke, and (4) resisting a smoke-less life. Men's reliance on and commitment to dominant ideals of masculinity seemed to preclude them from viewing their partner's tobacco reduction or cessation for pregnancy as an opportunity for cessation. Expectant and new fathers who smoke, however, may be optimally targeted for cessation interventions because it is a time when men experience discomfort with their smoking and when discontinuities in everyday life associated with the transition to fatherhood and presence of a new baby provide opportunities for establishing new routines. Implications for gender-sensitive smoking cessation interventions are discussed.
PubMed ID
16414163 View in PubMed
Less detail

Efficacy of a smoking-cessation intervention for elective-surgical patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180134
Source
Res Nurs Health. 2004 Jun;27(3):148-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Pamela A Ratner
Joy L Johnson
Chris G Richardson
Joan L Bottorff
Barbara Moffat
Martha Mackay
Doreen Fofonoff
Kori Kingsbury
Clara Miller
Bernice Budz
Author Affiliation
Nursing and Health Behaviour Research Unit, School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 2B5, Canada.
Source
Res Nurs Health. 2004 Jun;27(3):148-61
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Counseling
Educational Status
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Income
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Postoperative Period
Smoking Cessation - methods
Surgical Procedures, Elective
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We tested an intervention to help smokers abstain (fast) from smoking before surgery, maintain abstinence postoperatively, and achieve long-term cessation. A randomized experiment included 237 patients admitted for presurgical assessment who smoked. The intervention included counseling and nicotine replacement therapy. Treatment group participants (73.0%) were more likely to fast than were controls (53.0%): chi(2)(1, N = 228) = 8.89, p =.003, and more likely to be abstinent 6 months after surgery (31.2% vs. 20.2%). There was no significant difference in the abstinence rates at 12 months after surgery, chi(2)(1, N = 169)
PubMed ID
15141368 View in PubMed
Less detail

Voices from the community--experiences from the dental office: initiating oral cancer screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157904
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2008 Apr;74(3):239-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Denise M Laronde
Joan L Bottorff
T Greg Hislop
Catherine Y Poh
Brenda Currie
P Michele Williams
Miriam P Rosin
Author Affiliation
Simon Fraser University and BC Oral Cancer Prevention Program, BC Cancer Agency/Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia. dlaronde@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2008 Apr;74(3):239-41
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Dentist's Practice Patterns
Dentist-Patient Relations
Education, Dental, Continuing
Humans
Mass Screening
Mouth Neoplasms - diagnosis
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Professional Role
Time Management
PubMed ID
18387264 View in PubMed
Less detail

Distance art groups for women with breast cancer: guidelines and recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170574
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2006 Aug;14(8):849-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Kate Collie
Joan L Bottorff
Bonita C Long
Cristina Conati
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305-5718, USA. krcollie@stanford.edu
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2006 Aug;14(8):849-58
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Art Therapy - methods - organization & administration
Breast Neoplasms - psychology
Canada
Education, Distance - methods - organization & administration
Emotions
Female
Focus Groups - methods
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Informed consent
Self-Help Groups - organization & administration
Abstract
To overcome barriers that prevent women with breast cancer from attending support groups, innovative formats and modes of delivery both need to be considered. The present study was part of an interdisciplinary program of research in which researchers from counseling psychology, psycho-oncology, nursing, computer science, and fine arts have explored art making as an innovative format and telehealth as a mode of delivery. For this study, we conducted focus groups and interviews with 25 people with expertise about breast cancer, art, art therapy, and distance delivery of mental health services to generate guidelines for distance art-based psychosocial support services to women with breast cancer. A qualitative analysis of the focus group and interview data yielded guidelines for developers and facilitators of distance art groups for women with breast cancer pertaining to (a) emotional expression, (b) emotional support, (c) emotional safety, and (d) accommodating individual differences, plus special considerations for art therapy groups. Further research is needed pertaining to the use of computers, involvement of art therapists, and screening out vulnerable clients.
PubMed ID
16496188 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mothers who smoke: confessions and justifications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173165
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2005 Aug;26(7):577-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Lori G Irwin
Joy L Johnson
Joan L Bottorff
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. lori-irwin@shaw.ca
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2005 Aug;26(7):577-90
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Canada
Female
Guilt
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Behavior - psychology
Mothers - education - psychology
Narration
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology - prevention & control
Prenatal Care - standards
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - psychology
Social Responsibility
Abstract
Interviews with mothers who smoke were analyzed to examine the influence of social discourses. Women presented themselves as knowledgeable about the health risks of tobacco, confessed guilt and shame, attempted to deflect accusations of neglect for smoking or exposing their children to tobacco, provided rationalization that they smoked for the sake of their children, and, although they were all smokers, demonstrated an antismoking stance. The findings indicate that mothers are in a "bind" when it comes to smoking and fulfilling societal expectations of a good mother. Health professionals must be cognizant of how discourses constrain women's choices in relation to tobacco.
PubMed ID
16126601 View in PubMed
Less detail

Women's interest in genetic testing for breast cancer risk: the influence of sociodemographics and knowledge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191771
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002 Jan;11(1):89-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Joan L Bottorff
Pamela A Ratner
Lynda G Balneaves
Chris G Richardson
Mary McCullum
Tom Hack
Karen Chalmers
Jane Buxton
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, T201-2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2B5 Canada. bottorff@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002 Jan;11(1):89-95
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - genetics
British Columbia
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Educational Status
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Testing - utilization
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk assessment
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The objective of this study was to assess women's interest in genetic testing for breast cancer risk. Randomly selected samples of 761 women without breast cancer from the general population of British Columbia, Canada, and 260 women with breast cancer from the provincial cancer registry participated in a telephone survey that assessed interest in genetic testing for breast cancer risk, knowledge of hereditary breast cancer and genetic testing, and sociodemographics. Women with breast cancer did not possess superior knowledge of breast cancer genetics compared with women from the general population. Of the women with breast cancer, 30.8% reported interest in testing or had been tested, compared with 28.5% of women without breast cancer. Controlling for differences in age, education, personal history of breast cancer, and knowledge of genetics, women with at least one relative with breast cancer were 2.3 times more likely to express interest in genetic testing for breast cancer risk than those with no family history. There were significant interactions between breast cancer status and education and between age and knowledge of breast cancer genetics. Women without breast cancer and with a positive family history, who were between 20 and 40 years of age, were most likely to be interested in testing. The women with breast cancer who were interested in testing tended to be approximately 50 years of age, had a positive family history, and had more years of education. Women with a family history of breast cancer, well-educated women with breast cancer, and younger women, particularly those with knowledge of genetic testing, are important target audiences for community-based education on genetic testing for breast cancer risk.
PubMed ID
11815405 View in PubMed
Less detail

14 records – page 1 of 2.