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Improvement in the hospital organisation of CPR training and outcome after cardiac arrest in Sweden during a 10-year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137845
Source
Resuscitation. 2011 Apr;82(4):431-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
S. Aune
M. Eldh
J. Engdahl
S. Holmberg
J. Lindqvist
L. Svensson
E. Oddby
J. Herlitz
Author Affiliation
Inst of Medicine, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, SE-413 45 Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Resuscitation. 2011 Apr;82(4):431-5
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - education
Follow-Up Studies
Health Personnel - education
Heart Arrest - mortality - therapy
Hospital Administration - education
Hospitals
Humans
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To describe (a) changes in the organisation of training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the treatment of cardiac arrest in hospital in Sweden and (b) the clinical achievement, i.e. survival and cerebral function, among survivors after in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) in Sweden.
Aspects of CPR training among health care providers (HCPs) and treatment of IHCA in Sweden were evaluated in 3 national surveys (1999, 2003 and 2008). Patients with IHCA are recorded in a National Register covering two thirds of Swedish hospitals.
The proportion of hospitals with a CPR coordinator increased from 45% in 1999 to 93% in 2008. The majority of co-ordinators are nurses. The proportions of hospitals with local guidelines for acceptable delays from cardiac arrest to the start of CPR and defibrillation increased from 48% in 1999 to 88% in 2008. The proportion of hospitals using local defibrillation outside intensive care units prior to arrival of rescue team increased from 55% in 1999 to 86% in 2008. During the past 4 years in Sweden, survival to hospital discharge has been 29%. Among survivors, 93% have a cerebral performance category (CPC) score of I or II, indicating acceptable cerebral function.
During the last 10 years, there was a marked improvement in CPR training and treatment of IHCA in Sweden. During the past 4 years, survival after IHCA is high and the majority of survivors have acceptable cerebral function.
PubMed ID
21242019 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of trained Swedish lay rescuers toward CPR performance in an emergency. A survey of 1012 recently trained CPR rescuers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72217
Source
Resuscitation. 2000 Mar;44(1):27-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
A. Axelsson
A. Thorén
S. Holmberg
J. Herlitz
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Röda Srâket 4, SE-413 45, Göteborg, Sweden. asa.axelsson@alfa.telenordia.se
Source
Resuscitation. 2000 Mar;44(1):27-36
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - education
Consumer Participation
Data Collection
Emergencies
Female
Health Education - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Professional Competence
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
59 years old. Only 1% had attended the course because of their own or a relative's cardiac disease. Ninety-four per cent believed there was a minor to major risk of serious disease transmission while performing CPR. When predicting their willingness to perform CPR in six scenarios, 17% would not start CPR on a young drug addict, 7% would not perform CPR on an unkempt man, while 97% were sure about starting CPR on a relative and 91% on a known person. In four of six scenarios, respondents from rural areas were significantly more positive than respondents from metropolitan areas about starting CPR. In conclusion, readiness to perform CPR on a known person is high among trained CPR rescuers, while hesitation about performing CPR on a stranger is evident. Respondents from rural areas are more frequently positive about starting CPR than those from metropolitan areas.
PubMed ID
10699697 View in PubMed
Less detail

The importance of reducing delay in acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54680
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Mar;17(3):338-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
J. Herlitz
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Mar;17(3):338-40
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - therapy
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient Admission
Patient Education
Time Management
Treatment Outcome
Notes
Comment On: Eur Heart J. 1996 Mar;17(3):429-378737218
PubMed ID
8737207 View in PubMed
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Follow-up of a 1-year media campaign on delay times and ambulance use in suspected acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55172
Source
Eur Heart J. 1992 Feb;13(2):171-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
J. Herlitz
M. Blohm
M. Hartford
B W Karlson
R. Luepker
S. Holmberg
M. Risenfors
B. Wennerblom
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine I, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1992 Feb;13(2):171-7
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Ambulances - utilization
Female
Health education
Humans
Male
Mass Media
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - therapy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In order to reduce the delay times from onset of symptoms to arrival in hospital, and increase the use of ambulance in patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction (AMI), a media campaign was initiated in an urban area. An initial 3-week intense campaign was followed by a maintenance phase of 1 year. Delay times and ambulance use during the campaign were compared with the previous 21 months. Among patients admitted to a coronary care unit (CCU) due to suspected AMI, the median delay time was reduced from 3 h to 2 h 40 min and the mean delay time was reduced from 11 h 33 min to 7 h 42 min (P less than 0.001). Among patients with confirmed AMI the median delay time was reduced from 3 h to 2 h 20 min and the mean delay time from 10 h to 6 h 27 min (P less than 0.001). We conclude that a 1-year media campaign can reduce delay times in suspected AMI, and that this effect appears to continue at 1 year, but ambulance use seems to be more difficult to influence.
PubMed ID
1555612 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Evaluation of the media campaign Heart-Pain-90,000: time delay in acute myocardial infarct can be reduced]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55225
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Sep 11;88(37):2973-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-1991

Effect of a media campaign on delay times and ambulance use in suspected acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55409
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1989 Jul 1;64(1):90-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1989

[Cardiopulmonary resuscitation via telephone instruction. Chest compression more appropriate for instruction via telephone than CPR]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53836
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 10;98(41):4458-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-2001
Author
J. Herlitz
A. Bång
Author Affiliation
Kardiologdivisionen, SU-Sahlgrenska, Göteborg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 10;98(41):4458-61
Date
Oct-10-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - education - methods
Comparative Study
Emergency Medical Service Communication Systems
English Abstract
First Aid - methods
Heart Arrest - mortality - therapy
Hotlines
Humans
Survival Rate
Sweden
Telephone
Washington
Abstract
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) initiated by a bystander prior to arrival of the ambulance increases the chance of survival 2-3 times. Unfortunately a majority of patients do not receive such treatment. One way to approach the problem is to let the dispatcher instruct the witness in CPR via telephone when a presumed cardiac arrest occurs. In a recently performed study in Seattle patients with a presumed cardiac arrest were randomized to receive either traditional CPR (mouth-to-mouth ventilation plus chest compressions) or only chest compressions. Treatment was given by a witness via telephone instruction by the dispatcher. Among patients who only received chest compressions 14.6% could be discharged from hospital compared with 10.4% among patients who received traditional CPR. The difference was not significant. The results indicate that telephone instruction in CPR when a presumed cardiac arrest occurs might in certain cases preferably be restricted to chest compressions. The results of the trial are, however, difficult to translate into Swedish conditions, since ambulance response times in Sweden are much longer than in Seattle.
PubMed ID
11699252 View in PubMed
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[Life of more people with heart arrest outside hospital can be saved. Improved organization and education is required]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54236
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Apr 28;96(17):2074-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-28-1999

Reaction to a media campaign focusing on delay in acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55210
Source
Heart Lung. 1991 Nov;20(6):661-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
Author
M. Blohm
J. Herlitz
U. Schröder
M. Hartford
B W Karlson
M. Risenfors
E. Larsson
R. Luepker
B. Wennerblom
S. Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine I, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Heart Lung. 1991 Nov;20(6):661-6
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chest Pain - etiology
Emergencies
Female
Health Education - methods
Humans
Male
Mass Media
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications - therapy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
A media campaign conducted to reduce delay time and to increase the use of ambulance transport in acute myocardial infarction was performed in an urban area with about half a million inhabitants during 1 year. The main message was that chest pain lasting more than 15 minutes might indicate acute myocardial infarction; dial 90,000 immediately for ambulance transport to the hospital. The target population was the general public. After 6 and 12 months 400 and 610 randomly chosen persons, respectively, were contacted by telephone to evaluate the reaction of the general public to the campaign. Of these, 60% and 71%, respectively, had heard of the campaign, and all parts of the message were spontaneously remembered by 15% and 19%, respectively. The reaction to the campaign was generally positive. Among all patients admitted to the coronary care unit of one of the two city hospitals, 65% were aware of the campaign and 31% of them were of the opinion that they came to the hospital faster because of the campaign. In conclusion, a media campaign aimed at reducing patient delay time in acute myocardial infarction was shown to reach a majority of people in the community and patients with ischemic heart disease. The reaction was positive and about one fifth of interviewed people spontaneously remembered the total message.
PubMed ID
1960070 View in PubMed
Less detail

14 records – page 1 of 2.