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Effects of two years' educational intervention on dietary habits, serum cholesterol and blood pressure among 13 to 15 year old adolescents. The North Karelia youth project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243760
Source
Acta Cardiol. 1982;37(3):199-220
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
E. Vartiainen
P. Puska
U. Pallonen
P. Pöyhiä
Source
Acta Cardiol. 1982;37(3):199-220
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL
Diet
Female
Finland
Health education
Health promotion
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Male
Natriuresis
Nutritional Sciences - education
Risk
Abstract
A school and community based intervention to influence CVD risk factors and promote health in 13 to 15 year old children was carried out in North Karelia, Finland. The intervention was at two levels: 1) an intensive intervention in two schools and 2) a county-wide intervention in the remaining schools. Three pairs of matched schools were evaluated the two intensive intervention schools, two schools representing the county-wide intervention and two reference county schools. 851 children, their parents and teachers were studied before the intervention (1978) and after the intervention in 1980. The effect of intervention on serum and HDL-cholesterol, blood pressure and dietary habits is reported in this paper. The intervention had effect on fat use in both sexes and on total serum cholesterol in girls. Although there were some reported changes in the salt consumption in the desired direction these had no effect on blood pressure levels.
PubMed ID
6981903 View in PubMed
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Dietary changes in the North Karelia Project (1972-1982).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233348
Source
Prev Med. 1988 Mar;17(2):183-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1988
Author
P. Pietinen
A. Nissinen
E. Vartiainen
A. Tuomilehto
U. Uusitalo
A. Ketola
S. Moisio
P. Puska
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Epidemiology, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Prev Med. 1988 Mar;17(2):183-93
Date
Mar-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Cholesterol - blood
Dietary Fats - therapeutic use
Eating
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Sciences - education
Occupations
Abstract
The North Karelia Project is a community-based program to reduce the high cardiovascular disease rates in the province of North Karelia in eastern Finland. Dietary changes aimed at reducing serum cholesterol levels were among the main objectives. The evaluation of the program was based on examinations of independent cross-sectional population samples in 1972, 1977, and 1982 in North Karelia and in a matched reference area. A questionnaire was used to measure changes in dietary habits during the program. A major shift from whole to low-fat milk took place in both areas as well as a reduction in the amount of butter used on bread. The net reduction in North Karelia (difference in change compared with the reference area) in the intake of saturated fatty acids from milk and fat spreads used on bread was 20% in men and 14% in women. This reduction was similar in different age, education, and occupational groups suggesting that the dietary intervention had reached the whole community. The validity of the reported dietary changes was confirmed by parallel changes in serum cholesterol levels.
PubMed ID
3420071 View in PubMed
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Effect of two years of educational intervention on adolescent smoking (the North Karelia Youth Project).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242479
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 1983;61(3):529-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
E. Vartiainen
U. Pallonen
A. McAlister
K. Koskela
P. Puska
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 1983;61(3):529-32
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Finland
Health education
Humans
Male
Smoking - prevention & control
Abstract
A two-year educational intervention programme was carried out to try to prevent the onset of smoking among 13-15-year-olds in the county of North Karelia in eastern Finland. The aim of the programme was to teach the children skills to resist social pressures towards smoking. Older students (peer leaders) were trained to conduct the programme, which was directly managed in two schools and voluntarily implemented by the staff of about half of the remaining 23 schools in the county. Both types of intervention were associated with a significant reduction in self-reported onset rates of smoking. It is concluded that this type of innovative approach, based on modern psychosocial principles, is needed to control the smoking epidemic among adolescents.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1978 Mar;68(3):250-725026
Cites: Pediatrics. 1979 Apr;63(4):650-8440878
Cites: Prev Med. 1980 Jan;9(1):135-437360727
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1980 Jul;70(7):719-217386708
Cites: Acta Cardiol. 1982;37(3):199-2206981903
Cites: Prev Med. 1981 Mar;10(2):133-487220498
Cites: Med J Aust. 1981 May 30;1(11):586-77254039
Cites: Acta Med Scand. 1982;211(1-2):95-1037072526
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1980 Jul;70(7):722-57386709
PubMed ID
6603925 View in PubMed
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[20-year experience with the North Karelia Project. Preventive activities yield results].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219246
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(2):54-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
P. Puska
E. Vartiainen
J. Tuomilehto
A. Nissinen
Author Affiliation
Avd för epidemiologi och hälsofrämjande, Folkhälsoinstitutet, Helsingfors.
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(2):54-5
Date
1994
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Finland - epidemiology
Health education
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality - prevention & control
PubMed ID
8121789 View in PubMed
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Trends in body mass index and obesity among adults in Finland from 1972 to 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212781
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1996 Feb;20(2):114-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
P. Pietinen
E. Vartiainen
S. Männisto
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1996 Feb;20(2):114-20
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging
Body mass index
Cardiovascular diseases
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
To investigate trends in body mass index (BMI) and prevalence of obesity in different areas and educational groups in Finland.
Cardiovascular risk factor surveys carried out at five-year intervals among men and women aged 30 to 59 years from 1972 to 1992.
Body mass index and educational level have been measured in each survey.
BMI increased in men over 40 years of age until 1987 and then levelled off. BMI decreased in women in all age groups until 1982 and then levelled off. Even though all men have become heavier, the change has been smallest in the highest educated group. This difference is even more pronounced in women. The prevalence of obesity (BMI over 30 kg2) was 19% in men and 18% in women in 1992. The prevalence of overweight (BMI over 25 kg/m2) was 63% in men and 49% in women. The prevalence of obesity among men with the lowest educational level was 27% and in women 26%.
The differences in BMI between educational groups have become wider in both genders during 1972-1992.
PubMed ID
8646247 View in PubMed
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The role of family factors and school achievement in the progression of adolescents to regular smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129913
Source
Health Educ Res. 2012 Feb;27(1):57-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
M. Pennanen
E. Vartiainen
A. Haukkala
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, PO Box 41, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland. marjaana.pennanen@helsinki.fi
Source
Health Educ Res. 2012 Feb;27(1):57-68
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Educational Status
Family - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Parenting - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Single Parent - psychology
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
This study examines whether parental smoking and single parenting were related to adolescents' school achievement and anti-smoking parental practices as well as how these factors predicted later smoking. The sample comprised 1163 Finnish students in Grades 7 through 9. Results show that at the beginning of the seventh grade, parental smoking and single parenting were related to adolescents' lower levels of school achievement. Moreover, parental smoking had moderate association with lack of house smoking rules. At the beginning of the ninth grade, these associations were strengthened and lack of house smoking rules as well as loosened perceived parental punishment for smoking was related to both parental smoking and single parenting. The likelihood of ninth grade regular smoking was greater among adolescents whose parents smoked, who had no smoking rules in their homes and had substandard school achievement. These results suggest that smoking parents and single parents had similar anti-smoking regulations for their children at the baseline but once children became older smoking parents were not able to maintain these rules as successfully as non-smoking parents and families with two parents. Motivating parents to uphold these anti-smoking regulations offers a prospective intervention opportunity.
PubMed ID
22052215 View in PubMed
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Fifteen-year follow-up of smoking prevention effects in the North Karelia youth project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205699
Source
Am J Public Health. 1998 Jan;88(1):81-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
E. Vartiainen
M. Paavola
A. McAlister
P. Puska
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1998 Jan;88(1):81-5
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Education - methods
Humans
Intervention Studies
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
School Health Services
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
This study evaluated the long-term effects of a school- and community-based smoking prevention program in Finland.
Four intervention schools from North Karelia and two control schools from another province were chosen for the evaluation. Students who received the intervention were taught to resist social pressures to smoke. The program began in 1978 with seventh-grade students and ran through 1980, with a 15-year follow-up. In North Karelia, a community-based smoking cessation program for adults was also carried out.
Mean lifetime cigarette consumption was 22% lower among program subjects than among control subjects. Smoking and prevalence were lower up to the age of 21.
Long-term smoking prevention effects can be achieved if a school-based program using a social influence model is combined with community and mass media interventions.
Notes
Cites: Prev Med. 1993 May;22(3):325-348327416
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1993 Jun;83(6):872-808498627
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1994 Jun;23(3):495-5047960373
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Apr 12;273(14):1106-127707598
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1978 Mar;68(3):250-725026
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1980 Jul;70(7):719-217386708
Cites: Prev Med. 1982 Sep;11(5):550-707156063
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 1983;61(3):529-326603925
Cites: Health Psychol. 1985;4(5):449-883908090
Cites: Prev Med. 1986 Nov;15(6):692-83797400
Cites: J Sch Health. 1989 May;59(5):181-82739360
Cites: J Behav Med. 1989 Apr;12(2):207-182788222
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1989 Oct;79(10):1371-62782505
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1990 Jan;80(1):78-92293810
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991;623:332-492042842
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1992 Sep;82(9):1210-61503159
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1993 Jun;83(6):856-618498624
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1994 Jul;84(7):1148-508017542
PubMed ID
9584038 View in PubMed
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Nutrition as a component in community control of cardiovascular disease (the North Karelia Project).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230880
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1989 May;49(5 Suppl):1017-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1989

Age, education and occupation as determinants of trends in body mass index in Finland from 1982 to 1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196309
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Dec;24(12):1669-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
M. Lahti-Koski
E. Vartiainen
S. Männistö
P. Pietinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. Marjaana.Lahti-Koski@ktl.fi
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Dec;24(12):1669-76
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Occupations
Registries
Abstract
To investigate trends in body mass index (BMI) and prevalence of obesity among adults in Finland from 1982 to 1997, and to identify population groups with increasing obesity.
Random samples from the national population register including men and women aged 25-64 y (n = 24604, total).
Four cross-sectional surveys carried out in three areas in Finland every fifth year since 1982.
Weight and height were measured, and data on occupation and education level were collected by a self-administered questionnaire.
The mean BMI increased in both genders. In men, the upward trend was greatest (the increase of 1.3 kg/m2 in 15 y) in the oldest age group (55-64 y), and was found also (the increase of 0.6 kg/m2) in the youngest age group (25-34 y), whereas in women, the upward trend was most prominent (the increase of 0.9 kg/m2) in the youngest age group. BMI increased in all educational groups in men, but in women the upward trend seemed to be greatest in the lowest educational group. The upward trends were most prominent among retired and unemployed men, while in women changes in BMI were similar in all occupational groups.
The strongest upward trend in BMI was found in the oldest men, in the youngest age group in both genders and, in particular, among men who were outside the labor force. Education is still a strong determinant of obesity, especially in women, although the social gradient in BMI has not widened in the 1990s.
PubMed ID
11126222 View in PubMed
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Trends in self-rated health in Finland 1972-1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211174
Source
Prev Med. 1996 Sep-Oct;25(5):625-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Heistaro
E. Vartiainen
P. Puska
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Prev Med. 1996 Sep-Oct;25(5):625-32
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Income
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Examination
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Abstract
Self-rated health is a useful indicator of the population's health. Yet follow-up studies on perceived health trends are scarce. The aim of this paper is to assess perceived health trends in Finland between 1972 and 1992.
Five cross-sectional studies were done in two areas in eastern Finland every 5th year since 1972 and in a third area in southwestern Finland since 1982. The total number of respondents was 33,962. The respondents filled in a questionnaire, followed by a health examination. The subjects were categorized by age, education, and household income.
In 1972, one-third of the population reported good health, whereas in 1992 the rates were 50 and 60% for men and women, respectively. Younger persons reported better general health than older persons. High education and high household income were undisputed indicators of good health. Among men, their importance as predictors of good health diminished during the 20 years.
Finnish people today not only live longer but also feel healthier. In order to achieve good health for all population groups we need continual efforts to diminish the socioeconomic disparities.
PubMed ID
8888332 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.