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Obesity in relation to socioeconomic status. A population study of women in Göteborg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41008
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1980 Jun;34(2):139-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1980
Author
H. Noppa
C. Bengtsson
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1980 Jun;34(2):139-42
Date
Jun-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Marriage
Middle Aged
Obesity
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In a population sample of 1462 middle-aged women socioeconomic data were studied in relation to obesity, assessed by a body weight index. Education, annual income, and social class were negatively correlated with weight index (WI). Husband's social class was a stronger determinant of obesity in the woman than her own class. Age of husband and number of children were significantly correlated with WI. There was also a weak correlation between being single and WI. Sick leave was not correlated to WI. Pension was correlated to WI when adjusted for age, but not when allowance was also made for social class. Age, husband's social class, education, husband's income, and number of children were independent predictors of WI among the married women. In the single women, age and own income were independent predictors of WI but not number of children, education or own social class.
PubMed ID
7400727 View in PubMed
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Obesity in 70-year-old Swedes: secular changes over 30 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49600
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2005 Jul;29(7):810-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
G. Eiben
D K Dey
E. Rothenberg
B. Steen
C. Björkelund
C. Bengtsson
L. Lissner
Author Affiliation
Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Sweden. gabriele.eiben@medfak.gu.se
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2005 Jul;29(7):810-7
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Educational Status
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Secular increases in obesity have been widely reported in middle-aged adults, but less is known about such trends among the elderly. The primary purpose of this paper is to document the most recent wave of the obesity epidemic in population-based samples of 70-y-old men and women from Göteborg. Additionally, we will investigate the influences of physical activity, smoking and education on these secular trends. POPULATIONS AND METHODS: Five population-based samples of 3702 70-y-olds (1669 men and 2033 women) in Göteborg, Sweden, born between 1901 and 1930, were examined in the Gerontological and Geriatric Population Studies (H70) between 1971 and 2000. Cohort differences in anthropometric measures were the main outcomes studied. Physical activity, smoking habits and education were assessed by comparable methods in all cohorts. Subsamples of the women in the latest two cohorts (birth years 1922 and 1930) were also part of the Prospective Population Study of Women in Göteborg. In these women, it was possible to examine body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip circumference ratio (WHR) longitudinally since 1968. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Significant upward trends were found for height, weight, BMI, waist circumference (WC), WHR, prevalence of overweight (BMI> or =25 kg/m(2)) and obesity (BMI> or =30 kg/m(2)) across cohorts in both sexes. In 2000, 20% of the 70-y-old men born in 1930 were obese, and the largest increment (almost doubling) had occurred between the early 1980s and the early 1990s. In 70-y-old women the prevalence of obesity was 24% in 2000, a 50% increase compared to the cohort born 8 y earlier. BMI increased over time in all physical activity, smoking and education groups, with the exception of never-smoking men. Although 70-y-old women in 2000 were heavier than cohorts examined 8 y previously, data from the women studied longitudinally revealed that these differences were already present in earlier adulthood. In conclusion, the elderly population is very much part of the obesity epidemic, although secular trends in BMI were detected slightly earlier in men than in women. The health implications of these secular trends should be focused on in future gerontological research.
PubMed ID
15917864 View in PubMed
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Poor agreement between self-reported birth weight and birth weight from original records in adult women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196948
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Oct 1;152(7):609-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2000
Author
S W Andersson
A. Niklasson
L. Lapidus
L. Hallberg
C. Bengtsson
L. Hulthén
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition, Göteborg University, Sweden. susan.andersson@nutrition.gu.se
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Oct 1;152(7):609-16
Date
Oct-1-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Marital status
Medical Records
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Self Disclosure
Sweden
Abstract
Data from an ongoing prospective population study of women in Göteborg, Sweden, were used to assess agreement between self-reported birth weight and birth weight obtained from original delivery records of women aged 44-60 years. Of the eligible population with traced delivery records (n = 693), only 28% (n = 192) could report their own birth weight. Spearman correlation between self-reported birth weight and birth weight from original records was r = 0.76. However, a difference plot, with limits of agreement at -1,028 to 1,038 g (95% confidence limits: lower limit, -1,157 to -901 g, upper limit, 910 to 1,166 g) revealed poor agreement between methods. Of the self-reported birth weights, 53% were in error by 250 g or more, and 31% were positively or negatively discordant by 500 g or more. Application in an analysis of cardiovascular risk factors in adulthood found conflicting results between self-reported and recorded birth weights. Low reporting rate, poor reporting accuracy, and misleading findings in application led to the conclusion that self-reported birth weights from middle-aged women would not be a satisfactory replacement for birth weights from original records.
PubMed ID
11032155 View in PubMed
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Number of teeth and proximal periodontal bone height in relation to social factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241052
Source
Swed Dent J. 1984;8(4):183-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
A. Halling
C. Bengtsson
Source
Swed Dent J. 1984;8(4):183-91
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alveolar Process - anatomy & histology - radiography
Education
Female
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - diagnosis - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Periodontal Diseases - diagnosis - radiography
Residence Characteristics
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The dental status with respect to number of missing teeth and proximal periodontal bone height in relation to social factors were studied in a population sample of women 38-60 years of age. There was an overrepresentation of edentulous women among those who had grown up in a rural area, who had low education, and in those who belonged to a low socio-economic group (irrespective of whether the socio-economic group of the women themselves or of their husbands was studied), while no obvious differences were observed when the proximal periodontal bone height was studied in relation to social factors. The relationships between social factors and number of missing teeth seemed to be stronger than between social factors and any other variable included in the comprehensive population study, of which this examination of the dental status was one of a number of research projects.
PubMed ID
6594784 View in PubMed
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Socioeconomic status and the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis: results from the Swedish EIRA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13749
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2005 Nov;64(11):1588-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
C. Bengtsson
B. Nordmark
L. Klareskog
I. Lundberg
L. Alfredsson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Box 210, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. camilla.bengtsson@imm.ki.se
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2005 Nov;64(11):1588-94
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Case-Control Studies
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rheumatoid Factor - blood
Risk factors
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study whether formal education and occupational class are associated with incidence of rheumatoid arthritis overall and with the incidence of the two major subgroups of rheumatoid arthritis-seropositive (RF+) and seronegative (RF-) disease. METHODS: 930 cases and 1126 controls participated in a population based case-control study using incident cases of rheumatoid arthritis, carried out in Sweden during the period May 1996 to June 2001. The relative risk (RR) of developing rheumatoid arthritis with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated for different levels of formal education compared with university degree and for different occupational classes compared with higher non-manual employees. RESULTS: SUBJECTS: without a university degree had an increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis compared with those with a university degree (RR = 1.4 (95% CI, 1.2 to 1.8)). For manual employees, assistant and intermediate non-manual employees together, the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis was about 20% more than for non-manual employees. These increased risks were more pronounced for RF+ than for RF- rheumatoid arthritis and were mainly confined to women. Smoking could not of its own explain the observed associations between risk of rheumatoid arthritis in different socioeconomic groups in Sweden. CONCLUSIONS: There was an association between high socioeconomic status and lower risk of rheumatoid arthritis in a population based investigation that was representative for the Swedish population. The study shows that as yet unexplained environmental or lifestyle factors, or both, influence the risk of rheumatoid arthritis, even in the relatively egalitarian Swedish society.
PubMed ID
15843455 View in PubMed
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Socioeconomic status and mortality in Swedish women: opposing trends for cardiovascular disease and cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19613
Source
Epidemiology. 2001 Sep;12(5):532-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
C. Cabrera
Helgesson O
H. Wedel
C. Björkelund
C. Bengtsson
L. Lissner
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, Göteborg University, S-411 33 Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiology. 2001 Sep;12(5):532-6
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - mortality
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Income
Marital status
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Occupations
Prospective Studies
Risk
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We examined relations between socioeconomic status and cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes mellitus in a 24-year prospective study of 1,462 Swedish women. Two socioeconomic indicators were used: the husband's occupational category for married women and a composite indicator combining women's educational level with household income for all women. The husband's occupational category was strongly associated with cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality in opposite directions, independent of age and other potential confounders. Women with husbands of lower occupational categories had an increased risk of cardiovascular disease mortality [relative risk (RR) = 1.60; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.09-2.33] while experiencing lower rates of all-site cancer mortality (RR = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.50-0.96). A similar relation was seen with the composite variable: women with low socioeconomic status had an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (RR = 1.37; 95% CI = 1.01-1.84) but a somewhat lower risk for cancer of all sites (RR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.66-1.11). Finally, morbidity data (diabetes mellitus, stroke, and breast cancer) yielded results that were consistent with the mortality trends, and breast cancer appeared to account for a major part of the association between total cancer and high socioeconomic status. In summary, higher socioeconomic status was associated with decreased cardiovascular disease mortality and excess cancer mortality, in such a way that only a weak association was seen for all-cause mortality.
PubMed ID
11505172 View in PubMed
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Follow-up study of participants in an extensive health examination programme at a Swedish industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55308
Source
Klin Wochenschr. 1990 Dec 30;69(24):1146-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-30-1990
Author
G. Rose
C. Bengtsson
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Care Department, Volvo Truck Corporation, Gothenburg.
Source
Klin Wochenschr. 1990 Dec 30;69(24):1146-51
Date
Dec-30-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health education
Health promotion
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Multiphasic Screening
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Two years after an extensive health examination at a Swedish industry, a follow-up study was carried out in 110 employees (94% of those initially examined). The control included a history of the subject's health, a physical examination, an electrocardiogram, urine and faeces examinations and 16 chemical analyses of whole blood or serum. Except for repeat examinations of those who had had initial values outside reference values, most of the chemical analyses meant nothing, leading to unnecessary expense and possible risk of either worried or complacent participants. The history and physical and laboratory examinations, aimed at finding factors which can be improved by changing the life style seem to be most beneficial. It is concluded that extensive health examinations, including a large number of laboratory examinations which are carried out at many industries as a health control, should be critically evaluated at these industries.
PubMed ID
2135299 View in PubMed
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Subjectively experienced symptoms in relation to socio-economic factors in women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64407
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 1996 Dec;12(6):617-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
B. Furunes
C. Bengtsson
L. Lapidus
Author Affiliation
Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 1996 Dec;12(6):617-24
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Disease - etiology
Educational Status
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Marital status
Middle Aged
Parity
Population Surveillance - methods
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Women's health
Women, Working
Abstract
As observed in a cross-sectional population study of 1,302 women, aged 44-66 years and representative of middle-aged women living in a Swedish city, symptoms and complaints were found to be unevenly distributed in the female population. Factors such as foreign origin, low education, different kinds of isolation such as not working outside of the home, being divorced or widowed seemed to be factors which increased the risk of experiencing different symptoms and complaints. When meeting a patient with a complaint it is important to take all possible causes into consideration including socio-economic factors.
PubMed ID
8982622 View in PubMed
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Feasibility of a primary health care programme aiming at reducing cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risk factors among women in a Swedish community, Strömstad.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50279
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1991 Jun;9(2):89-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
C. Björkelund
C. Bengtsson
Author Affiliation
Health Centre of Strömstad, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1991 Jun;9(2):89-95
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Cerebrovascular Disorders - prevention & control
Comparative Study
Diet
Exercise
Feasibility Studies
Female
Health education
Humans
Intervention Studies
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
In the Swedish community of Strömstad, where the mortality from cardiovascular disease is high in the female population, all women aged 45-64 years were offered a health survey with the main purpose of screening for cardiovascular risk factors. Altogether 927 of 1084 women (86%) participated. Women with one or more risk factors were invited to attend a three-month course organized by the primary health care service to receive information about how they themselves could influence their risk factors by changing dietary and physical exercise patterns. At a follow-up survey three months later, the participants in the courses had significantly improved many of their risk factor values compared with the non-participants. The improvement was still mainly present a year later.
PubMed ID
1891663 View in PubMed
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Social factors and tooth loss in a 12-year follow-up study of women in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73611
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1991 Jun;19(3):141-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
M. Ahlqwist
C. Bengtsson
H G Gröndahl
L. Lapidus
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Radiology, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1991 Jun;19(3):141-6
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - utilization
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Marriage
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Women's health
Abstract
Representative samples of women in different age groups in Gothenburg, Sweden, were examined by means of panoramic radiography in 1968-69 and in 1980-81. Edentulousness and number of remaining teeth were assessed from the radiographs. Data on socioeconomic conditions, educational background and dental care attendance were obtained from a questionnaire. Cross-sectional results showed that improvements in dental status had occurred irrespective of socioeconomic conditions and educational levels and that differences between groups had decreased over the 12-yr period. Dental care attendance was high in all socioeconomic groups, but differences noted in 1968-69 remained in 1980-81.
PubMed ID
1864065 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.