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[The postgraduate training of general practitioners in communication and counseling. A questionnaire survey in the county of Aarhus].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191143
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Feb 11;164(7):895-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-11-2002
Author
Jette Møller Nielsen
Peter Vedsted
Frede Olesen
Author Affiliation
Forskningsenheden for Almen Medicin, Aarhus Universitet, Vennelyst Boulevard 6, DK-8000 Arhus C. jmn@alm.au.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Feb 11;164(7):895-9
Date
Feb-11-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Counseling - education
Denmark
Education, Medical, Continuing
Education, Medical, Graduate
Humans
Physicians, Family - education
Psychiatry - education
Psychotherapy - education
Questionnaires
Abstract
The study aimed to describe the postgraduate training of the general practitioners (GPs) in communication and psychiatric counselling.
GPs in Aarhus County, Denmark, received a mailed questionnaire about psychiatric hospital training, participation in courses and Balint groups (psychiatric supervision), and their need for further training.
The questionnaire was returned by 320 (74.4%) GPs. Almost all GPs had received some kind of postgraduate training although to a very varying extent. Almost half had taken courses of more than three days' duration, and half were members of a psychiatric supervision group. Two-thirds of the GPs thought they needed further training. The need was independent of the GP's evaluation of his/her own psychiatric education.
PubMed ID
11881553 View in PubMed
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Deficiencies of cross-training between pediatrics and otolaryngology: a survey of specialists in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171224
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2006 Mar;70(3):545-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Michael Clifford Fabian
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Humber River Regional Hospital, Toronto, Ont., Canada. fabianent@shaw.ca
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2006 Mar;70(3):545-51
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education - standards
Education, Medical - standards
Humans
Otolaryngology - education
Pediatrics - education
Questionnaires
Abstract
Conditions relating to the ear, nose and throat are very frequent problems encountered by general pediatricians. Similarly, a major percentage of patients seen and operated on by the general otolaryngologist are of the pediatric age group. The pilot study demonstrated that pediatric program directors of both specialties in Canada have identified a deficiency of cross-training and desire the need for more cross-training. The aim of this study was to survey practicing physicians of both specialties for their input.
Surveys were sent to a large cross-section of pediatricians and otolaryngologists in Canada. They were asked to complete a questionnaire relating to their training experience, their desired training, important topics and general comments. Demographic data were collected including generalist versus sub-specialist, the year that residency was completed and country of training. Results were tabulated and analyzed.
The response rate was high, being 70.6% and 76.2% for pediatricians and otolaryngologists, respectively. One hundred percent of pediatricians indicated that formal training by otolaryngologists was necessary, while 95% of otolaryngologists indicate a need for formal training by pediatricians during residency. Pediatricians desire more training using all three educational venues, namely lectures, clinics and rotations. While they are receiving lectures more often, they indicate that clinics are the most important mode of education. Otolaryngologists desire more formal training by pediatricians in the areas of lectures and clinics. They indicate the most important mode of education is lectures. There was no significant difference between generalists and sub-specialists or based on country of training for either group. There is some indication, in both specialties, of an increase of cross-training occurring within the past five years.
This study has shown that there is a perceived deficiency of cross-training between the two specialties. Both pediatricians and otolaryngologists have indicated that they need more formal cross-training. This is a very important area to address, as this study relates directly to the optimum health of children in Canada and worldwide.
PubMed ID
16406082 View in PubMed
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Improving gerontology content in baccalaureate nursing education through knowledge transfer to nurse educators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146197
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(3):33-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Lynn McCleary
Katherine McGilton
Veronique Boscart
Abram Oudshoorn
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON. Persistent high fever and systemic inflammation
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(3):33-46
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Education, Nursing, Graduate
Faculty, Nursing
Geriatric Nursing - education
Humans
Inservice training
Nursing Education Research
Abstract
Across practice settings, most nursing care is provided to older adults. Yet most nurses receive limited education to care for older adults, especially those with complex needs. A Knowledge Exchange Institute for Geriatric Nursing Education brought together 31 Canadian nursing faculty members and nursing doctoral students and provided them with tools and resources to enhance teaching and curriculum in baccalaureate nursing programs. Guided by the Knowledge-to-Action Process model, participants received usable summaries of the best research evidence about care for older adults and tools to increase the likelihood of successful integration of these resources in their teaching and curriculum. Feedback from participants indicates that their personal goals and the goals of the Knowledge Exchange were met. Through a public interactive wiki, participants and others will continue the process of knowledge exchange to improve nursing education and nursing care for older persons.
PubMed ID
20057265 View in PubMed
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[Using the internet in continuous medical education]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7275
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Aug 28;123(16):2274-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-2003
Author
Torgeir Bruun Wyller
Author Affiliation
Geriatrisk avdeling, Ullevål universitetssykehus, 0407 Oslo. t.b.wyller@ioks.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Aug 28;123(16):2274-6
Date
Aug-28-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Communication
Education, Distance
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
English Abstract
Geriatric Nursing - education
Geriatrics - education
Humans
Internet
Interprofessional Relations
Norway
Occupational Medicine - education
Physical Therapy (Specialty) - education
Remote Consultation
Telephone
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Modern information technology enables alternative strategies for education and communication. This is a description of a project for systematic utilisation of the internet for distant meetings and professional communication within geriatric medicine. METHOD: A net site has been developed and is being used for the distribution of professionally relevant material, as well as visual aids for audio conferences. The hospitals take their turn giving introductions, and active audience participation is a must. The project has been assessed through a questionnaire survey. RESULTS: 88 audio conferences have been carried out since September 1998. The number of participating hospitals has increased from 6 to 28; the audience varies from 40 to 90 per session. On average, 56% are doctors, 19% nurses, 20% physiotherapists or occupational therapists, 4% have other backgrounds. 100 persons returned the questionnaire (response rate 86%). At an ordinal scale from 1 (bad) to 5 (good), respondents' median global assessment of the project was 4 (interquartile range 3-4); they were particularly satisfied with the professional standard of the lectures, and they found it motivating to work in a field in which modern information technology is put to use. Their use of the net site for other purposes than the audio conferences was very limited. INTERPRETATION: Health professionals in the field of geriatrics saw the project as a help in keeping themselves up to date. Audio conferences may supplement intramural educational sessions but cannot substitute for them.
PubMed ID
14508553 View in PubMed
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A comparison between three electronic media and in-person learning for continuing education in physical rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186230
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2003;9(1):17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Edward Lemaire
G. Greene
Author Affiliation
Institute for Rehabilitation Research and Development, The Rehabilitation Centre, 505 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M2, Canada. elemaire@rohcg.on.ca
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2003;9(1):17-22
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Distance - methods
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Educational Technology - standards
Humans
Ontario
Rehabilitation - education
Teaching Materials - standards
Abstract
We produced continuing education material in physical rehabilitation using a variety of electronic media. We compared four methods of delivering the learning modules: in person with a computer projector, desktop videoconferencing, Web pages and CD-ROM. Health-care workers at eight community hospitals and two nursing homes were asked to participate in the project. A total of 394 questionnaires were received for all modalities: 73 for in-person sessions, 50 for desktop conferencing, 227 for Web pages and 44 for CD-ROM. This represents a 100% response rate from the in-person, desktop conferencing and CD-ROM groups; the response rate for the Web group is unknown, since the questionnaires were completed online. Almost all participants found the modules to be helpful in their work. The CD-ROM group gave significantly higher ratings than the Web page group, although all four learning modalities received high ratings. A combination of all four modalities would be required to provide the best possible learning opportunity.
PubMed ID
12641888 View in PubMed
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An interdisciplinary rural health course: opportunities and challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188132
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2002 Jul;22(5):387-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
Frances E Racher
Author Affiliation
School of Health Studies, Brandon University, Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. racher@brandonu.ca
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2002 Jul;22(5):387-92
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Nursing - education
Counseling - education
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Education, Professional, Retraining - organization & administration
Humans
Manitoba
Needs Assessment
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Psychiatric Nursing - education
Rural Health
Social Work - education
Abstract
What is the potential of courses designed for nursing students to meet the learning priorities of other disciplines? Who could benefit? Nursing students at Brandon University interested in the 'community as client' concept requested a course that focused on the health of rural residents and the communities in which they live. Questions about (1) measuring the health of rural populations; (2) comparing health status, health resources and health care utilization of rural and urban populations; and (3) determining the health of rural communities emerged. As a result the course, 'Health of Rural Populations and Communities', was created. The Director of the Rural Development Institute examined the syllabus for the new course and asked that Rural Development students be allowed to enroll. This paper focuses on the challenges and opportunities for nursing education to address learning needs of other disciplines by sharing health and nursing knowledge. In doing so the learning of nursing students is also advanced. The development and delivery of a rural health course is used as a case study to illustrate the potential of this approach for nursing and interdisciplinary education.
PubMed ID
12383738 View in PubMed
Less detail

Training in occupational and environmental medicine: the US should look to international models.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146723
Source
Arch Environ Occup Health. 2009;64(4):215-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009

Cardiology education and examination: evolution or revolution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198760
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2000 Apr;16(4):455-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
V F Huckell
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2000 Apr;16(4):455-6
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cardiology - education
Child
Education, Medical, Graduate
Educational Measurement
Humans
Teaching
Notes
Comment On: Can J Cardiol. 2000 Apr;16(4):457-6210787459
PubMed ID
10787458 View in PubMed
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A distance education in undergraduate dietetic education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4741
Source
J Allied Health. 2005;34(1):36-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Carrie Benton-King
Derek F Webb
ZoeAnn Holmes
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Anchorage, Culinary Arts, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. afcdk@uaa.alaska.edu
Source
J Allied Health. 2005;34(1):36-9
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Distance - methods - organization & administration
Health Occupations - education
Humans
Internet
Nutrition - education
Abstract
Distance education is an exploding phenomenon that allows people to pursue higher education on their own time, at a pace that meets their needs, in locations where there are no colleges and universities, or where there is not a desired program of study. This study examined the use of distance education in undergraduate dietetic education programs and the opportunities for obtaining an undergraduate degree in dietetics solely via distance education. A survey was sent to all directors (n = 279) of undergraduate programs accredited/approved by the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education to determine the current status and projected future use of distance education in their institutions' on-campus programs. The survey had a 54% response rate. Approximately 32% (n = 150) of undergraduate dietetics programs offer distance education courses in some format. Institutions that offer nondietetics distance education courses were more likely to offer dietetics distance education courses. The most common distance education format utilized in dietetics was 100% Internet courses (48%). The most common distance education dietetics course offered was a basic or introductory nutrition course (31%). From the data of courses offered, or permitted to be transferred, it would not be possible for a student to complete an undergraduate degree in dietetics solely via distance education methodologies at the time this study was conducted.
PubMed ID
15839604 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Problems and prospects of physicians' training in "medical prophylaxis" specialty].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181740
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2003;(12):8-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
A M Bol'shakov
S G Domnin
E N Kutepov
A V Leonov
A V Lobov
V G Maimulov
Iu V Nesvizhkii
V V Semenova
M V Fokin
N Iu Tselykovskaia
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2003;(12):8-10
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Continuing
Education, Medical, Graduate
Humans
Preventive Medicine - education
Russia
Abstract
According to a Concept of continuous special education, postgraduate special training remains an essential link in creating a widely educated doctor with humanistic and natural-science ideology, high culture and knowledge of contemporary circumstances.
PubMed ID
14753042 View in PubMed
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6067 records – page 1 of 607.