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3426 records – page 1 of 343.

Performance of administrators, professionals, and paraprofessionals during community-based brain injury rehabilitation training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205431
Source
J Head Trauma Rehabil. 1998 Jun;13(3):82-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
B. Willer
J. Button
C. Willer
D W Good
Author Affiliation
State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214, USA.
Source
J Head Trauma Rehabil. 1998 Jun;13(3):82-93
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - education
Allied Health Personnel - education
Brain Injuries - rehabilitation
Education, Professional
Educational Measurement
Health Personnel - education
Humans
Ontario
Program Evaluation
Rehabilitation - education
Abstract
Two related studies that evaluated the impact of a continuing education program about community-based rehabilitation on the performance of administrators, professionals, and paraprofessionals are presented. One study contained a second part that examined whether differences between pre-course test performance and post-course test performance might be accounted for by practice effects.
Factorial mixed model designs.
University classroom.
Three hundred and eight professionals, administrators, and paraprofessionals from a variety of community-based rehabilitation programs.
The 4-day graduate-level course focused on three content areas: brain and behavior relationships, behavioral and cognitive intervention strategies, and a rehabilitation philosophy that emphasizes individual client rights.
An examination completed before and immediately after taking the course.
Professionals and administrators perform better than paraprofessionals when tested at the beginning and end of the training. However, the absolute differences among these groups were not substantial. In addition, the rate of learning course content was the same for administrators, paraprofessionals, and professionals.
The results support the usefulness of training for all levels of staff and suggest that all levels of staff benefit in an equal fashion.
PubMed ID
9582181 View in PubMed
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[Continuing medical education via questionnaire studies. Three pilot projects for anesthesiology, cardiology and neurology].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208418
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 May 19;159(21):3140-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-19-1997
Author
P. Mortensen
T. Pedersen
H. Nielsen
C V Ringsted
I A Jacobsen
O. Lidegaard
S. Walter
L. Højgaard
Author Affiliation
Laegeforeningens centrale efteruddannelsesudvalg.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 May 19;159(21):3140-5
Date
May-19-1997
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology - education
Cardiology - education
Denmark
Education, Medical, Continuing
Humans
Neurology - education
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Abstract
The Danish Medical Association and the scientific societies have initiated three studies to evaluate the use of questionnaires for continuous medical education. One study was a questionnaire in anaesthesiology with 30 questions with answers yes/no/no answer, which was sent to 600 specialists in anaesthesiology. One study was in cardiology with a multiple choice questionnaire, sent to 300 general practitioners and 75 specialists in internal medicine outside cardiology. One study concerned the educational value of State-of-the-Art articles about neurology in Ugeskrift for Laeger (Journal of the Danish Medical Association) sent to 500 doctors outside neurology. All questionnaires were sent anonymously, with one general reminder. For the anaesthesiology study 234 questionnaires were returned (40.5%). In the cardiology study 195 questionnaires were returned (52%). For the study on neurology 278 answered (56%). Only about half of the questionnaires were returned for the three studies, and a lot of effort and resources were put into the studies. An extension from these small pilot studies to a general systematic continuous methodology with updated questionnaires in the postgraduate medical education seems troublesome. An optional self-registration for medical education such as The Canadian "Mocomp concept" might be a more realistic suggestion.
PubMed ID
9199000 View in PubMed
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Decentralized didactic training for physician assistants: academic performances across training sites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199907
Source
J Allied Health. 1999;28(4):220-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
R. Ballweg
K H Wick
Author Affiliation
MEDEX Northwest Physician Assistant Training Program, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle 98105, USA.
Source
J Allied Health. 1999;28(4):220-5
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Behavioral Sciences - education
Clinical Medicine - education
Curriculum
Education, Distance - organization & administration
Educational Measurement
Emergency Medicine - education
Humans
Physician Assistants - education
Program Evaluation
Retrospective Studies
Washington
Abstract
Decentralized training for the didactic portion of allied health programs has been assessed for its ability to increase the likelihood that graduates will practice in underserved areas. The question still remains whether these distant sites provide an education that is comparable to that offered at the main campuses. Exams and final grades for all classes over the course of five years at MEDEX Northwest in Seattle were compared to determine whether there was any major discrepancy between the main training location and the decentralized sites. With the exception of three individual cases, overall academic performances in all training sites were comparable. This suggests that programs employing some of the curricular and administrative controls in place at MEDEX Northwest can achieve a parity in education across their various training sites.
PubMed ID
10614554 View in PubMed
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[The training of medical service specialists of the Federal Border Guards Service of Russia who conduct epidemiological health surveillance].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201544
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1999 May;320(5):63-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999

RN first assisting--1997 Canadian update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208256
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 1997 Jun;15(2):13-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
G A Groetzsch
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 1997 Jun;15(2):13-7
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Humans
Operating Room Nursing - education
Operating Room Technicians - education
Physician Assistants - education
Abstract
Canada appears to have little formal history of nurses functioning in a RN first assistant (RNFA) role. On recent examination, however, perioperative nurses are first assisting in Canada daily, and several provinces have started programs. The following articles provides an overview of RNFA activities as of April 1997.
PubMed ID
9304912 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Dec 16;89(51-52):4476
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-16-1992
Author
J. Soreff
Author Affiliation
Ortopediska kliniken Södersjukhuset.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Dec 16;89(51-52):4476
Date
Dec-16-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Medical - standards
Educational Measurement
Humans
Orthopedics - education
Questionnaires
Sweden
PubMed ID
1469989 View in PubMed
Less detail

Royal Navy/Royal Marines Surgical Team exercise Clockwork North, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5303
Source
J R Nav Med Serv. 1998;84(2):105-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
K. Eves
Author Affiliation
Royal Hospital, Haslar.
Source
J R Nav Med Serv. 1998;84(2):105-6
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Continuing - methods
Humans
Naval Medicine - education
Norway
Surgery - education
Abstract
The integration of RNST 1 and 3 together with our integration as a whole with Med Squadron was successfully and effectively implemented and clearly indicated that should we be required to work together as a collective in the future, either in a training capacity or on an operational deployment, we are prepared. The opportunity to carry out AST was highly beneficial and although taxing at times for many, provided a package suitable for all levels of experience. Once again, living in such field conditions was often interesting, sometimes daunting and also eye-opening. The change to the MEDEX phase of the deployment was a disappointment to most but another exercise is planned in Wales. On a positive note, it was very beneficial to actually be involved in erecting the DRASH as previously we had only ever seen it in its formed state. In conclusion, the poignant message from this exercise took three main forms: first, the integration of the two teams was smooth and we worked well together. Secondly, we all learnt something from the high quality arctic training we were given and all successfully passed this, and finally, some new aspects to the DRASH system. All in all this deployment was of a high standard and has shown that the interaction between Med Squadron, Cdo Logistics Regt RM and RNSTs is ever improving.
PubMed ID
10326306 View in PubMed
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[Professional nursing guidance--also for somatic nurses].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218152
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1994 May 25;94(21):20-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-25-1994
Author
B. Hansen
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1994 May 25;94(21):20-2
Date
May-25-1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Counseling - education
Denmark
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Humans
Specialties, Nursing - education
PubMed ID
7985112 View in PubMed
Less detail

Oncology education and cancer prevention in a high-risk region of Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23822
Source
J Cancer Educ. 1994;9(3):138-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
S M Shikhman
W. Igitov
N. Zadonceva
W. Phedotov
A. Lazarev
W. Kling
O. Kushnareva
Author Affiliation
Oncology Department, Altai State Medical Institute, Barnaul, Russia.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 1994;9(3):138-40
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Education, Continuing
Education, Medical, Continuing
Environmental pollution
Health education
Health Personnel - education
Humans
Medical Oncology - education
Neoplasms - etiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Siberia
Abstract
A part of the Altai Territory of Russia has been subjected to radioactive contamination from nuclear testing. Cancer morbidity in neighboring areas has increased 15-27%. An anticancer program begun in 1993 is in the developmental stage. In conjunction with a number of social measures, a significant education program is being developed. It includes, first, education of health care professionals in the prevention and early diagnosis of cancer, and second, public cancer education. For this purpose it has been necessary to develop teaching programs for doctors and other health care professionals (undergraduate and postgraduate), schoolteachers and schoolchildren, administrators, members of the working classes, and clergy. Because the population has already been subjected to a dangerous radiation load, the program for health care professionals is designed to eliminate whenever possible the need for radiographic and isotope investigations for screening purposes and diagnosis. The public cancer education program includes data about the importance of healthy lifestyles and skills for self-examination. The authors invite the collaboration of colleagues in other countries who have had experience with regional cancer education programs.
PubMed ID
7811599 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Psychiatric nursing--proposal eliminates one's own education. Interview by Erik Dale].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208963
Source
Tidsskr Sykepl. 1997 Mar 25;85(6):22-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-25-1997
Author
A. Andersen
Source
Tidsskr Sykepl. 1997 Mar 25;85(6):22-3
Date
Mar-25-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Humans
Norway
Psychiatric Nursing - education
Social Work - education
PubMed ID
9456855 View in PubMed
Less detail

3426 records – page 1 of 343.