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Allergic conditions and risk of hematological malignancies in adults: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15117
Source
BMC Public Health. 2004 Nov 4;4:51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-2004
Author
Karin C Söderberg
Lars Hagmar
Judith Schwartzbaum
Maria Feychting
Author Affiliation
The Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, S-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Karin.Soderberg@imm.ki.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2004 Nov 4;4:51
Date
Nov-4-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Eczema - complications - epidemiology
Female
Hematologic Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Hodgkin Disease - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Leukemia - complications - epidemiology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - complications - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - complications - epidemiology
Risk
Self Disclosure
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Two contradictory hypotheses have been proposed to explain the relationship between allergic conditions and malignancies, the immune surveillance hypothesis and the antigenic stimulation hypothesis. The former advocates that allergic conditions may be protective against development of cancer, whereas the latter proposes an increased risk. This relationship has been studied in several case-control studies, but only in a few cohort studies. METHODS: The association between allergic conditions and risk of developing leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and myeloma was investigated in a cohort of 16,539 Swedish twins born 1886-1925. Prospectively collected, self-reported information about allergic conditions such as asthma, hay fever or eczema was obtained through questionnaires administered in 1967. The cohort was followed 1969-99 and cancer incidence was ascertained from the Swedish Cancer Registry. RESULTS: Hives and asthma tended to increase the risk of leukemia (relative risk [RR] = 2.1, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.0-4.5 and RR = 1.6, 95% CI 0.8-3.5, respectively). There was also an indication of an increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma associated with eczema during childhood (RR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.0-5.3). CONCLUSION: In contrast to most previous studies, our results do not indicate a protective effect of allergic conditions on the risk of developing hematological malignancies. Rather, they suggest that allergic conditions might increase the risk of some hematological malignancies.
PubMed ID
15527506 View in PubMed
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Atopic and nonatopic eczema in adolescence: is there a difference?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276207
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2015 Oct;173(4):962-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
E K Johansson
N. Ballardini
A. Bergström
I. Kull
C-F Wahlgren
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2015 Oct;173(4):962-8
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age of Onset
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - complications - epidemiology
Eczema - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
There is limited information on clinical manifestations of atopic eczema (AE) and non-AE in teenagers.
To describe the characteristics of adolescent eczema in the general population and to identify potential differences between AE and non-AE in teenagers.
Overall, 3108 teenagers were included from the population-based BAMSE cohort and 2529 of these teenagers provided blood samples for analysis of specific IgE. At age 16 years, the teenagers answered questionnaires regarding the symptoms of eczema, asthma and rhinitis for the previous year.
The prevalence of eczema in adolescence was 9·6% (n = 297). More girls than boys had eczema (12·5% vs. 6·5%; P 
Notes
Comment In: Br J Dermatol. 2015 Oct;173(4):88926511824
PubMed ID
25970379 View in PubMed
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Eczema among adults: prevalence, risk factors and relation to airway diseases. Results from a large-scale population survey in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126618
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2012 Jun;166(6):1301-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
E P Rönmark
L. Ekerljung
J. Lötvall
G. Wennergren
E. Rönmark
K. Torén
B. Lundbäck
Author Affiliation
Krefting Research Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 424, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden. erik.ronmark@gu.se
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2012 Jun;166(6):1301-8
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Eczema - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Rhinitis - complications - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
In contrast to asthma and rhinitis, few studies among adults investigating the prevalence and risk factors of eczema have been published.
To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of eczema among adults in West Sweden. A further aim was to study the associations between asthma, rhinitis and eczema.
A questionnaire on respiratory health was mailed in 2008 to 30,000 randomly selected subjects in West Sweden aged 16-75 years; 62% responded. The questionnaire included questions about eczema, respiratory symptoms and diseases and their possible determinants. A subgroup of 669 subjects underwent skin prick testing against common airborne allergens.
'Eczema ever' was reported by 40·7% and 'current eczema' by 11·5%. Both conditions were significantly more common among women. The prevalence decreased with increasing age. The coexistence of both asthma and rhinitis with eczema was common. The main risk factors were family history of allergy and asthma. The dominant environmental risk factor was occupational exposure to gas, dust or fumes. Smoking increased the risk. Eczema was associated with urbanization, while growing up on a farm was associated with a decreased risk. Added one by one to the multivariate model, asthma, allergic rhinitis and any positive skin prick test were associated with eczema.
Eczema among adults is a common disease with more women than men having and having had eczema. Eczema is associated with other atopic diseases and with airway symptoms. Hereditary factors and exposure to gas, dust and fumes are associated with eczema.
PubMed ID
22372948 View in PubMed
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History of allergic diseases and lung cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105234
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2014 Mar;112(3):230-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Mariam El-Zein
Marie-Elise Parent
Jack Siemiatycki
Marie-Claude Rousseau
Author Affiliation
INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Université du Québec, Laval, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2014 Mar;112(3):230-6
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Eczema - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - complications - epidemiology
Risk
Risk factors
Self Report
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
The exact nature and direction of the association between a history of allergic diseases and lung cancer risk remain controversial.
To examine the association between self-reported history of allergic diseases and lung cancer using data from a population-based case-control study conducted in the Montreal metropolitan area (1996-2002).
The study is based on interview data collected from 1,169 incident lung cancer cases and 1,486 controls. Separate logistic regression models were used to estimate the relative risk of lung cancer, using odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), in subjects with vs without asthma, eczema, or hay fever after adjustment for several sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, including smoking.
For asthma, the OR was 0.90 (95% CI 0.65-1.24), which decreased to 0.76 (95% CI 0.54-1.08) for subjects whose onset was more than 2 years before lung cancer diagnosis or interview and then to 0.64 (95% CI 0.44-0.93) when restricted to subjects who reported using medication for their asthma. For eczema, the point estimate was 0.73 (95% CI 0.48-1.12), which decreased to 0.63 (95% CI 0.38-1.07) when considering eczema only in those who reported medication use. Hay fever showed the strongest inverse association with lung cancer (OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.24-0.59).
All 3 allergic diseases examined were inversely associated with lung cancer, although the strength of the protective effect varied. History of allergic diseases seems to have a protective role in lung cancer incidence, after consideration of potential confounders, including lifetime smoking history.
PubMed ID
24439421 View in PubMed
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Incidence of hand eczema-a population-based retrospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15170
Source
J Invest Dermatol. 2004 Apr;122(4):873-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Birgitta Meding
Bengt Järvholm
Author Affiliation
Occupational Dermatology, National Institute for Working Life, Stockholm, Sweden. birgitta.meding@nivl.se
Source
J Invest Dermatol. 2004 Apr;122(4):873-7
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - complications
Child
Eczema - complications - epidemiology
Female
Hand
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - complications
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
When etiological relationship is of interest, the incidence rate is a preferred measure. The aim of the present retrospective study was to estimate the incidence rate of self-reported hand eczema in a sample from the general population and to study the relation of this to age, sex, and atopy. A questionnaire was mailed to 3000 individuals aged 20-65 y, randomly selected from the population register of Göteborg, Sweden. This gave a response rate of 73.9%. Questions were asked about ever having had hand eczema, time of onset of the disease, history of childhood eczema, and history of asthma/hay fever. The crude incidence rate of self-reported hand eczema was 5.5 cases per 1000 person-years (females 7.1 and males 4.0). There was no difference, however, in incidence rate between women and men above 30 y of age. In a Poisson regression analysis, female sex, childhood eczema, and asthma/hay fever were all significantly associated with hand eczema, but only at ages below 30 y. A moderate influence of recall bias and a probable tendency to underreport imply that the incidence rates presented are to be considered as minimum rates.
PubMed ID
15102075 View in PubMed
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