Skip header and navigation

Refine By

30 records – page 1 of 3.

[Russian Scientific Conference with International Participation "Medical and Biological Problems of Toxicology and Radiobiology" (4-6 June 2015, St. Petersburg)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271096
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2015 Sep-Oct;55(5):550-5
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Author
A N Grebenyuk
V I Naidich
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2015 Sep-Oct;55(5):550-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Ecotoxicology
Humans
Radiobiology
Research
Russia
PubMed ID
26863786 View in PubMed
Less detail

Northern exposures, northern risks: toxicology in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154654
Source
Chem Res Toxicol. 2008 Oct;21(10):1909-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
P David Josephy
Daniel G Cyr
Source
Chem Res Toxicol. 2008 Oct;21(10):1909-12
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Ecotoxicology
Humans
Risk factors
Societies, Scientific
PubMed ID
18928326 View in PubMed
Less detail

Persistent organic pollutants in Antarctica: current and future research priorities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101851
Source
J Environ Monit. 2011 Mar;13(3):497-504
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Susan Bengtson Nash
Author Affiliation
Griffith University, the Atmospheric Environment Research Centre (AERC), Nathan, Queensland 4111, Australia. s.bengtsonnash@griffith.edu.au
Source
J Environ Monit. 2011 Mar;13(3):497-504
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antarctic Regions
Climate change
Ecotoxicology - trends
Environmental Pollutants
Humans
Organic Chemicals
Research
Abstract
As Antarctica's pivotal role in influencing global climate processes gains increasing attention so too does public and scientific interest in the general state of Antarctic ecosystem health as a function of multiple stressors, including contamination by anthropogenic chemicals. Persistent organic pollutant (POP) research internationally has sought to elucidate the impacts of an ever increasing diversity of POPs on the environment. The challenges of this research are compounded in the Antarctic context, by key gaps in historical data and our understanding of chemical behaviour in polar landscapes. In order to ensure maximum longevity and value of research outputs, efforts must be centred upon addressing these research gaps. Ultimately, Antarctic POP research will benefit from co-ordinated investment into spatially and temporally comprehensive research and monitoring efforts such as those responsible for the continued progress of this research field in the Arctic and other global regions.
PubMed ID
21321741 View in PubMed
Less detail

6TH NORWEGIAN ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY SYMPOSIUM: Assessing and solving environmental challenges in a multiple stressor world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296704
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2017; 80(16-18):805-806
Publication Type
Introductory Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Knut Erik Tollefsen
Sam Kacew
Author Affiliation
a Section for Ecotoxicology and Risk Assessment, Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA) , Oslo , Norway.
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2017; 80(16-18):805-806
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Introductory Journal Article
Keywords
Ecotoxicology
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Norway
Risk Assessment - methods
PubMed ID
28829685 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chemical footprint method for improved communication of freshwater ecotoxicity impacts in the context of ecological limits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268474
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Nov 18;48(22):13253-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-18-2014
Author
Anders Bjørn
Miriam Diamond
Morten Birkved
Michael Zwicky Hauschild
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Nov 18;48(22):13253-62
Date
Nov-18-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cities
Communication
Denmark
Ecosystem
Ecotoxicology
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Geography
Pesticides - analysis
Uncertainty
Abstract
The ecological footprint method has been successful in communicating environmental impacts of anthropogenic activities in the context of ecological limits. We introduce a chemical footprint method that expresses ecotoxicity impacts from anthropogenic chemical emissions as the dilution needed to avoid freshwater ecosystem damage. The indicator is based on USEtox characterization factors with a modified toxicity reference point. Chemical footprint results can be compared to the actual dilution capacity within the geographic vicinity receiving the emissions to estimate whether its ecological limit has been exceeded and hence whether emissions can be expected to be environmentally sustainable. The footprint method was illustrated using two case studies. The first was all inventoried emissions from European countries and selected metropolitan areas in 2004, which indicated that the dilution capacity was likely exceeded for most European countries and all landlocked metropolitan areas. The second case study indicated that peak application of pesticides alone was likely to exceed Denmark's freshwater dilution capacity in 1999-2011. The uncertainty assessment showed that better spatially differentiated fate factors would be useful and pointed out other major sources of uncertainty and some opportunities to reduce these.
PubMed ID
25347848 View in PubMed
Less detail

Importance of freeze-thaw events in low temperature ecotoxicology of cold tolerant enchytraeids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267613
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Aug 19;48(16):9790-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-19-2014
Author
Ana L Patrício Silva
Kirsten Enggrob
Stine Slotsbo
Mónica J B Amorim
Martin Holmstrup
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Aug 19;48(16):9790-6
Date
Aug-19-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Ecotoxicology
Glycogen - metabolism
Oligochaeta - drug effects - metabolism
Phenols - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Soil Pollutants - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Temperature
Abstract
Due to global warming it is predicted that freeze-thaw cycles will increase in Arctic and cold temperate regions. The effects of this variation becomes of particular ecological importance to freeze-tolerant species when it is combined with chemical pollutants. We compared the effect of control temperature (2 °C), daily freeze-thaw cycles (2 to -4 °C) and constant freezing (-2 °C) temperatures on the cold-tolerance of oligochaete worms (Enchytraeus albidus) and tested how survival was influenced by pre-exposure to 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), a common nonionic detergent found in sewage sludge amended soils. Results showed that combined effect of 4-NP and daily freeze-thaw cycles can cause higher mortality to worms as compared with sustained freezing or control temperature. Exposure to 4-NP caused a substantial depletion of glycogen reserves which is catabolized during freezing to produce cryoprotective concentrations of free glucose. Further, exposure to freeze-thaw cycles resulted in higher concentrations of 4-NP in worm tissues as compared to constant freezing or control temperature (2 °C). Thus, worms exposed to combined effect of freeze-thaw cycles and 4-NP suffer higher consequences, with the toxic effect of the chemical potentiating the deleterious effects of freezing and thawing.
PubMed ID
25072919 View in PubMed
Less detail

Freshwater ecotoxicity impacts from pesticide use in animal and vegetable foods produced in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292522
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Mar 01; 581-582:448-459
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-01-2017
Author
Maria Nordborg
Jennifer Davis
Christel Cederberg
Anna Woodhouse
Author Affiliation
Department of Energy and Environment, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: maria.nordborg@gmail.com.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Mar 01; 581-582:448-459
Date
Mar-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animal Feed
Animals
Brazil
Ecotoxicology
Food Contamination
Fresh Water
Meat - analysis
Pesticides - adverse effects
Sweden
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
Chemical pesticides are widely used in modern agriculture but their potential negative impacts are seldom considered in environmental assessments of food products. This study aims to assess and compare the potential freshwater ecotoxicity impacts due to pesticide use in the primary production of six food products: chicken fillet, minced pork, minced beef, milk, pea soup, and wheat bread. The assessment is based on a detailed and site-specific inventory of pesticide use in the primary production of the food products, all of which are produced in Sweden. Soybeans, used to produce the animal-based food products, are grown in Brazil. Pesticide emissions to air and surface water were calculated using PestLCI v. 2.0.5. Ecotoxicity impacts were assessed using USEtox v. 2.01, and expressed in relation to five functional units. The results show that the animal-based food products have considerably larger impact potentials than the plant-based food products. In relation to kg pea soup, impact potentials of bread, milk, minced beef, chicken fillet and minced pork are ca. 2, 3, 50, 140 and 170 times larger, respectively. All mass-based functional units yield the same ranking. Notably, chicken fillet and minced pork have larger impacts than minced beef and milk, regardless of functional unit, due to extensive use of pesticides, some with high toxicity, in soybean production. This result stands in sharp contrast to typical carbon footprint and land use results which attribute larger impacts to beef than to chicken and pork. Measures for reducing impacts are discussed. In particular, we show that by substituting soybeans with locally sourced feed crops, the impact potentials of minced pork and chicken fillet are reduced by ca. 70 and 90%, respectively. Brazilian soybean production is heavily reliant on pesticides. We propose that weak legislation, in combination with tropical climate and agronomic practices, explains this situation.
PubMed ID
28082057 View in PubMed
Less detail

Distribution and dispersal of metals in contaminated fibrous sediments of industrial origin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296510
Source
Chemosphere. 2019 Jan; 215:470-481
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Anna Apler
Ian Snowball
Paul Frogner-Kockum
Sarah Josefsson
Author Affiliation
Geological Survey of Sweden, Box 670, 751 28 Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Villavägen 16, 752 36 Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: anna.apler@sgu.se.
Source
Chemosphere. 2019 Jan; 215:470-481
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adsorption
Cellulose - adverse effects - ultrastructure
Ecotoxicology
Environmental monitoring
Estuaries
Industrial Waste - analysis
Metals - analysis
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Industrial emissions can impact aquatic environments and unregulated discharges from pulp and paper factories have resulted in deposits of cellulose fiber along the Swedish coast. These deposits are contaminated by metals, but due to their unique fibrous character the extent of sorption and dispersal of the metals is unclear. Fibrous sediments were sampled at two sites in the Ångermanälven river estuary, Sweden. The partitioning of metals between the sediment, pore water and bottom water was investigated and the degree of bioavailability was evaluated. The levels of metals in the sediment were high in fibrous or offshore samples, depending on the metal, whereas the levels of dissolved metals in pore water were low or below the limit of quantification. Partition coefficients (KD) showed that sorption to the sediment was stronger at one of the fibrous sites, possibly related to the type and size of organic matter. Undisturbed bottom water samples contained low levels of both dissolved and particle bound metals, but when comparing measured metal concentrations to threshold values of ecological status and ecotoxicological assessment criteria, both sediments and bottom water may be detrimental to living organisms. In-situ re-suspension experiments showed that the concentrations of particle bound metals increased whereas the dissolved concentrations decreased. The analyzed metals are probably retained by the solid phases of the fibrous sediment or adsorbed to particles in the water, reducing their bioavailability.
PubMed ID
30340155 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mercury in fur of Daubenton's bat (Myotis daubentonii) in Southern Sweden and Comparison to Ecotoxicological Thresholds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290214
Source
Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2017 Nov; 99(5):561-566
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Staffan Åkerblom
Johnny de Jong
Author Affiliation
Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 750 07, Uppsala, Sweden. staffan.akerblom@slu.se.
Source
Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2017 Nov; 99(5):561-566
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Chiroptera - metabolism
Ecotoxicology
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Europe
Hair - chemistry - metabolism
Mercury - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Sweden
Abstract
To characterise mercury (Hg) exposure in Daubenton's bat (Myotis daubentonii, Kuhl 1817) in southern Sweden, 17 specimens were captured in 2013 and back fur samples were taken for analysis to determine Hg concentrations. The fur Hg levels determined [1.15?±?0.27 (mean?±?standard deviation, n?=?17) µg Hg g-1 fresh weight (fw)] represent a baseline for comparison in future assessments of Hg exposure in bat populations in northern Europe. Mercury concentrations were close to those reported in fur from other bat species, but were lower than proposed toxicological thresholds in bats (>?30 µg Hg g-1 fw) and mice (5 µg Hg g-1 fw). This is the first study to examine Hg exposure in bats in Scandinavia.
Notes
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2013 May 21;47(10):4967-83 PMID 23590191
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Feb 17;49(4):2059-65 PMID 25591047
Cites: Environ Res. 1977 Aug;14(1):30-4 PMID 560962
Cites: Biol Trace Elem Res. 2017 Feb;175(2):237-243 PMID 27278962
Cites: Ecotoxicology. 2010 Oct;19(7):1277-84 PMID 20596767
Cites: Ecotoxicology. 2014 Jan;23(1):45-55 PMID 24271419
Cites: Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Feb;24(6):5497-5508 PMID 28028704
Cites: Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 1978 Nov;20(5):696-701 PMID 737347
Cites: Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2001 Jun;66(6):699-706 PMID 11353370
Cites: Ecotoxicology. 2014 Oct;23(8):1419-29 PMID 25048962
Cites: Environ Toxicol Chem. 2010 Mar;29(3):501-6 PMID 20821471
Cites: Chemosphere. 2016 Mar;147:376-81 PMID 26774302
Cites: Ambio. 2014;43 Suppl 1:91-103 PMID 25403972
Cites: Ambio. 2007 Feb;36(1):12-8 PMID 17408187
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2016 Jul;214:847-858 PMID 27155931
Cites: Crit Rev Toxicol. 2006 Sep;36(8):609-62 PMID 16973445
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2007 Jul;148(2):483-90 PMID 17257720
Cites: Reprod Toxicol. 2009 Jul;28(1):81-9 PMID 19427169
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2015 Dec;207:52-8 PMID 26340299
Cites: J Toxicol Environ Health. 1980 May;6(3):597-606 PMID 7420467
Cites: Ecotoxicology. 2012 May;21(4):1094-101 PMID 22331394
PubMed ID
29128886 View in PubMed
Less detail

[On the occasion of the 65th anniversary of the birth of Valeriy Nikolaevich Rakitskiy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268665
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Sep-Oct;94(5):119
Publication Type
Article

30 records – page 1 of 3.