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1485 records – page 1 of 149.

Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment (PAME)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288536
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Arctic Council
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Changing Ecosystem
Marine biodiversity & Sustainability
Conservation of Natural Resources
Ecosystem
Arctic Regions
Abstract
PAME is one of six Arctic Council working groups and is the focal point of the Arctic Council's activities related to the protection and sustainable use of the arctic marine environment.
Online Resources
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Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Changing Ecosystem
Shifting Species
Computational Biology
Biological Science Disciplines
Ecology
Education
Graduate
Research
Ecosystem
Abstract
Located at University of Alaska Fairbanks, IAB supports faculty and post-doctoral research and graduate education in the life sciences of wildlife, physiology, genetics and evolutionary biology, ecology and ecosystems, biomedicine, and bioinformatics and computational biology.
Online Resources
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[Post-logging organic matter recovery in forest ecosystems of eastern Baikal region]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97687
Source
Izv Akad Nauk Ser Biol. 2010 Jan-Feb;(1):83-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
E F Vedrova
L V Mukhortova
V V Ivanov
L V Krivobokov
M V Boloneva
Source
Izv Akad Nauk Ser Biol. 2010 Jan-Feb;(1):83-94
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ecosystem
Siberia
Soil
Trees - physiology
Abstract
The dynamics of organic matter accumulated in the soil and main vegetation elements was analyzed for post-logging forest ecosystem succession series in eastern Baikal region. The phytomass was found to allocate up 63 and 50% of carbon in undisturbed Scots pine and fir stands, respectively. The post-logging phytomass contribution to the total carbon pool appeared to decrease down to 16% in Scots pine and 6% in fir stands. In Scots pine stands, carbon storage was determined to account for almost 70% of the initial carbon 60 years after logging. In 50- to 55-year-old fir stands, carbon recovered its initial pool only by 10%. Soil carbon recorded in recently logged Scots pine and fir sites appeared to be 5 and 16 times that accumulated in the phytomass, respectively. The ratio between phytomass carbon and soil organic matter recovered back to the prelogging level in Scots pine stands by the age of 50-60 years. While phytomass carbon also increased in fir stand of the same age, it did not reach the level of the control stand.
PubMed ID
20235433 View in PubMed
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Abrupt climate change and collapse of deep-sea ecosystems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95566
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Feb 5;105(5):1556-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-5-2008
Author
Yasuhara Moriaki
Cronin Thomas M
Demenocal Peter B
Okahashi Hisayo
Linsley Braddock K
Author Affiliation
U.S. Geological Survey, 926A National Center, Reston, VA 20192, USA. moriakiyasuhara@gmail.com
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Feb 5;105(5):1556-60
Date
Feb-5-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Climate
Crustacea
Ecosystem
Seawater
Abstract
We investigated the deep-sea fossil record of benthic ostracodes during periods of rapid climate and oceanographic change over the past 20,000 years in a core from intermediate depth in the northwestern Atlantic. Results show that deep-sea benthic community "collapses" occur with faunal turnover of up to 50% during major climatically driven oceanographic changes. Species diversity as measured by the Shannon-Wiener index falls from 3 to as low as 1.6 during these events. Major disruptions in the benthic communities commenced with Heinrich Event 1, the Inter-Allerød Cold Period (IACP: 13.1 ka), the Younger Dryas (YD: 12.9-11.5 ka), and several Holocene Bond events when changes in deep-water circulation occurred. The largest collapse is associated with the YD/IACP and is characterized by an abrupt two-step decrease in both the upper North Atlantic Deep Water assemblage and species diversity at 13.1 ka and at 12.2 ka. The ostracode fauna at this site did not fully recover until approximately 8 ka, with the establishment of Labrador Sea Water ventilation. Ecologically opportunistic slope species prospered during this community collapse. Other abrupt community collapses during the past 20 ka generally correspond to millennial climate events. These results indicate that deep-sea ecosystems are not immune to the effects of rapid climate changes occurring over centuries or less.
PubMed ID
18227517 View in PubMed
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The impact of seaweed cultivation on ecosystem services - a case study from the west coast of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295469
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Aug; 133:53-64
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
Linus Hasselström
Wouter Visch
Fredrik Gröndahl
Göran M Nylund
Henrik Pavia
Author Affiliation
KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Science and Engineering, Teknikringen 34, SE-133 31 Stockholm, Sweden; Anthesis Enveco AB, Barnhusgatan 4, bv, 111 23 Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: plh@kth.se.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Aug; 133:53-64
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aquaculture
Biomass
Ecosystem
Seaweed
Sweden
Abstract
Seaweed cultivation attracts growing interest and sustainability assessments from various perspectives are needed. The paper presents a holistic qualitative assessment of ecosystem services affected by seaweed cultivation on the Swedish west coast. Results suggest that supporting, regulating and provisioning services are mainly positively or non-affected while some of the cultural services are likely negatively affected. The analysis opens for a discussion on the framing of seaweed cultivation - is it a way of supplying ecosystem services and/or a way of generating valuable biomass? Exploring these framings further in local contexts may be valuable for identifying trade-offs and designing appropriate policies and development strategies. Many of the found impacts are likely generalizable in their character across sites and scales of cultivation, but for some services, including most of the supporting services, the character of impacts is likely to be site-specific and not generalizable.
PubMed ID
30041346 View in PubMed
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[THE MOSQUITOES (DIPTERA, CULICIDAE) OF THE KIROV REGION].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266840
Source
Parazitologiia. 2015 May-Jun;49(3):208-24
Publication Type
Article
Author
E V Panukova
S V Pestov
Source
Parazitologiia. 2015 May-Jun;49(3):208-24
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Culicidae - classification - physiology
Ecosystem
Russia
Abstract
It analyzed the data of mosquitoes caching on the Kirov region area. The habitat distribution and species diversity are analyzes. The checklist includes 25 species.
PubMed ID
26373194 View in PubMed
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Reference Intervals for Serum Biochemistries of Molting Pacific Black Brant ( Branta bernicla nigricans) in Northern Alaska, USA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289651
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2017 04; 53(2):417-419
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
04-2017
Author
J Christian Franson
Paul L Flint
Joel A Schmutz
Author Affiliation
1 US Geological Survey, National Wildlife Health Center, 6006 Schroeder Road, Madison, Wisconsin 53711, USA.
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2017 04; 53(2):417-419
Date
04-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Anseriformes
Ecosystem
Geese
Molting
Abstract
We determined reference intervals for nine serum biochemistries in samples from 329 molting, after-hatch-year, Pacific Black Brant ( Branta bernicla nigricans) in Alaska, US. Cholesterol and nonesterified fatty acids differed by sex, but no other differences were noted.
PubMed ID
28094610 View in PubMed
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Influence of littoral periphyton on whole-lake metabolism relates to littoral vegetation in humic lakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295515
Source
Ecology. 2017 Dec; 98(12):3074-3085
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Jussi Vesterinen
Shawn P Devlin
Jari Syväranta
Roger I Jones
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological and Environmental Science, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, Jyväskylä, FI-40014, Finland.
Source
Ecology. 2017 Dec; 98(12):3074-3085
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Carbon
Ecosystem
Finland
Lakes - chemistry
Periphyton
Abstract
The role of littoral habitats in lake metabolism has been underrated, especially in humic lakes, based on an assumption of low benthic primary production (PP) due to low light penetration into water. This assumption has been challenged by recent recognition of littoral epiphyton dominance of whole-lake PP in a small highly humic lake and of epiphyton as an important basal food source for humic lake biota. However, as these studies have mostly concerned single lakes, there is a need to test their wider generality. We studied the whole-lake PP and community respiration (CR) in eight small humic lakes in southern Finland during July 2015 using 14 C incorporation to measure pelagic PP and the changes in dissolved inorganic carbon in light and dark in situ incubations to measure CR and littoral PP by epiphyton. Changes in O2 concentration in both pelagic and littoral surface water were measured periodically from each lake and, additionally, continuously with a data logger from one lake during the study period. The results revealed that the littoral dominated whole-lake net primary production (NPP) in five of the eight lakes, which was supported by observed O2 supersaturation in the littoral surface water in most of the lakes. Calculated pelagic:littoral ratios by area correlated negatively with both littoral NPP and littoral contribution to whole-lake NPP. Moreover, there was a significant positive relationship between littoral proportion of whole-lake NPP and the fraction of lake surface area covered by littoral aquatic vegetation. This demonstrates that increased aquatic littoral vegetation cover increases the overall importance of the littoral to whole-lake PP in highly humic lakes. Littoral NPP also correlated strongly with littoral O2 saturation, and the continuously measured O2 revealed substantial temporal variation in O2 saturation, particularly in the littoral zone. Whole-lake gross primary production:community respiration (GPP:CR) ratios revealed that accounting for littoral metabolism produced a marked shift towards lake metabolic balance, although all the eight lakes remained net heterotrophic. This study emphasizes that littoral metabolism needs to be accounted for when estimating whole-lake C fluxes in all lakes, even in highly colored humic waters.
PubMed ID
28888038 View in PubMed
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On the crucial importance of a small bird: The ecosystem services of the little auk (Alle alle) population in Northwest Greenland in a long-term perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295704
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):226-243
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Anders Mosbech
Kasper Lambert Johansen
Thomas A Davidson
Martin Appelt
Bjarne Grønnow
Christine Cuyler
Peter Lyngs
Janne Flora
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioscience, Arctic Research Centre, Aarhus University, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000, Roskilde, Denmark. amo@bios.au.dk.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):226-243
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Birds
Charadriiformes
Ecology
Ecosystem
Greenland
Abstract
The little auk is the most numerous seabird in the North Atlantic and its most important breeding area is the eastern shores of the North Water polynya. Here, a population of an estimated 33 million pairs breeds in huge colonies and significantly shapes the ecosystem. Archaeological remains in the colonies document that the little auk has been harvested over millennia. Anthropological research discloses how the little auk has a role both as social engineer and as a significant resource for the Inughuit today. The hunting can be practiced without costly equipment, and has no gender and age discrimination in contrast to the dominant hunt for marine mammals. Little auks are ecological engineers in the sense that they transport vast amounts of nutrients from sea to land, where the nutrients are deposited as guano. Here, the fertilized vegetation provides important foraging opportunities for hares, geese, fox, reindeer, and the introduced muskox. We estimate that the relative muskox density is ten times higher within 1 km of little auk fertilized vegetation hotspots.
PubMed ID
29516440 View in PubMed
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What if plant functional types conceal species-specific responses to environment? Study on arctic shrub communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295932
Source
Ecology. 2017 Jun; 98(6):1600-1612
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Patrick Saccone
Kristiina Hoikka
Risto Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Ecology and Genetics, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FI-90014, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Ecology. 2017 Jun; 98(6):1600-1612
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Ecosystem
Plants
Seasons
Snow
Abstract
Plant functional types (PFT) are increasingly used to outline biome-scale plant-environment relationship and predict global change effects on community structure. However, the potentials and limitations of the PFT approach have to be tested as they can be less sensitive than trait-based or species-level approaches. Here, we compare the responses of deciduous-evergreen shrub PFTs and species to gradual snow-related environmental conditions by also considering effects of aboveground architectural traits and neighboring shrubs. Five deciduous species and four evergreen dwarf shrub species were transplanted to be exposed to four levels of winter snow cover across mesotopographic gradients in northern Fennoscandian tundra. The survival and growth of individually tagged shoots were monitored over one year, and the change in cover of shrubs was monitored over four years. Evergreen species showed higher resistance to environmental severity and generally benefitted from higher abundance of neighboring shrubs. Deciduous species exhibited negligible to drastic responses to snow thickness and neighboring shrubs tended to have a negative effect on their performance and survival. Tall shoots of deciduous shrubs survived poorly under the thinnest snow cover. Overall, deciduous and evergreen PFTs showed modest differences in their performances along the gradient. Our results show that deciduous-evergreen leaf phenology categories predict shrub responses to changing environmental conditions only to a limited extent. Our findings highlight strong species-specific responses especially among deciduous shrubs, and a differential role of plant-plant interactions for shrubs. Our results emphasize that distribution patterns of arctic-alpine shrubs and shrub community responses to altered snow regimes depend on species-level plant functional attributes, species interactions and species-specific sensitivities to environmental severity.
PubMed ID
28317109 View in PubMed
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1485 records – page 1 of 149.