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155 records – page 1 of 16.

[Abortion is an expensive contraceptive]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66469
Source
Lakartidningen. 1973 Jan 31;70(5):343
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-1973

[Actions taken during a smallpox epidemic cost 10 million Norwegian crowns]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57990
Source
Nord Med. 1973 Sep;88(7):216
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1973

American and Soviet medical manpower: growth and evolution, 1910-1970.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252835
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1975;5(3):455-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975
Author
M G Field
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1975;5(3):455-74
Date
1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Economics, Medical
Education, Medical
Female
Humans
Male
Medicine
Middle Aged
Physicians - supply & distribution
Physicians, Women - supply & distribution
Population Density
Residence Characteristics
Rural Health - manpower
Russia
Specialization
United States
Abstract
Between 1910 and 1970 the number of physicians in the United States increased 2.5 times, in Soviet Russia almost 25 times. The number of physicians per constant unit of population remained fairly stable in the United States, rising slightly in the last few years. In the U.S.S.R. that number increased 16 to 18 times, and now stands about 50 per cent higher than in the United States. About 10 per cent of American physicians are women; in the U.S.S.R. it is about 70 per cent. Neither society has resolved the problem of deploying physicians to the rural areas. American physicians are more specialized than their Soviet colleagues. The article concludes with general remarks about the two health systems, pointing out resemblances and divergences. The hypothesis of a possible "convergence" is entertained.
PubMed ID
128531 View in PubMed
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An analysis of Medicare's Incentive Payment program for physicians in health professional shortage areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180555
Source
J Rural Health. 2004;20(2):109-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Leighton Chan
L Gary Hart
Thomas C Ricketts
Shelli K Beaver
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Wash., USA. leighton@u.washington.edu
Source
J Rural Health. 2004;20(2):109-17
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Cohort Studies
Economics, Medical
Humans
Medically underserved area
Medicare Assignment - statistics & numerical data
Medicare Part B - economics - statistics & numerical data
Northwestern United States
Reimbursement, Incentive - utilization
Retrospective Studies
Rural Health Services - economics
Southeastern United States
Specialization
Urban Health Services - economics
Abstract
Medicare's Incentive Payment (MIP) program provides a 10% bonus payment to providers who treat Medicare patients in rural and urban areas where there is a shortage of generalist physicians.
To examine the experience of Alaska, Idaho, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Washington with the MIP program. We determined the program's utilization and which types of physicians received payments.
Retrospective cohort design, utilizing complete 1998 Medicare Part B data. Physician specialty was determined through American Medical Association data. Rural status was determined by linking the physician business ZIP code to its Rural-Urban Commuting Area code (RUCA).
There were 2,220,275 patients and 39,749 providers in the cohort, including 9,769 (24.6%) generalists, 21,331 (53.7%) specialists, and 8,649 (21.8%) nonphysician providers. Over $4 million in bonus payments (median payment = $173) were made to providers in HPSAs. Specialists and urban providers received 58% and 14% of the bonus reimbursements, respectively. Two million dollars in payments were not distributed because the providers did not claim them. Over $2.8 million in bonus claims were distributed to providers who likely did not work in approved HPSA sites.
The MIP bonus payments given to providers are small. Many providers who should have claimed the bonus did not, and many providers who likely did not qualify for the bonus claimed and received it. Consideration should be given to focusing and enlarging the bonus payments to specific providers, rather than rewarding all providers equally. Policy makers should also consider a system that prospectively determines provider eligibility.
PubMed ID
15085623 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lakartidningen. 1974 Jun 5;71(23):2371-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-1974

[An information system for the analysis of economic indices of the activity of a medical institution].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184414
Source
Med Tekh. 2003 May-Jun;(3):20-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
L Ia Bukharbaeva
Source
Med Tekh. 2003 May-Jun;(3):20-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - organization & administration
Costs and Cost Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Economics
Economics, Medical
Financing, Government - economics
Health Services - economics
Hospital Information Systems - economics
Humans
Insurance, Major Medical - economics
Medical Laboratory Science - economics
Russia
Abstract
An information technology for analyzing the economic parameters of a medical institution is suggested in the article within the framework of the information system already functioning in the Republican foundation of compulsory medical insurance (Bashkortostan). The analysis of financing the therapeutic-and-prophylactic facilities is based on the graphic-and-analytic method and on extensive real statistics.
PubMed ID
12872639 View in PubMed
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[A physician demand and supply forecast model for Nova Scotia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171961
Source
Cah Sociol Demogr Med. 2005 Apr-Sep;45(2-3):255-85
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kisalaya Basu
Anil Gupta
Author Affiliation
Economiste principal, Division de la modélisation par microsimulation de l'analyse des données, Direction de la recherche appliquée et de l'analyse, Ministère de la Santé, Canada.
Source
Cah Sociol Demogr Med. 2005 Apr-Sep;45(2-3):255-85
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging
Economics, Medical
Emigration and Immigration
Family Practice - economics - manpower
Female
Forecasting
Foreign Medical Graduates
General Surgery - economics - manpower
Health Manpower
Health Policy
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Nova Scotia
Physicians - supply & distribution
Population Growth
Retirement
Specialization
Abstract
There is well-founded concern about the current and future availability of Health Human Resources (HHR). Demographic trends are magnifying this concern -- an ageing population will require more medical interventions at a time when the HHR workforce itself is ageing. The lengthy and costly training period for most health care workers, especially physicians, poses a real challenge that requires planning these activities well in advance. Hence, there is definite need for a good HHR forecasting model.
To present a physician forecasting model that projects the Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) demand for and supply of physicians in Nova Scotia to the year 2020 for three specialties: general practitioners, medical, and surgical. The model enables gap analysis and assessment of alternative policy options designed to close the gaps.
The methodology for estimating demand fo physician services involves three steps: (i) Establishing the FT for each physician. To this end we calculate the income of each physician using Physician Billings Data and then identify the 40th and 60th percentile income levels for each of the 40 specialties. The income levels are then used to calculate the FTE using a formula developed at Health Canada; (ii) Calculating the FTE for each service by distributing the FTE of each physician at the service level (i.e., by patient age, sex, most responsible diagnosis, and hospital status group); and (iii) Using Statistics Canada's population projections to project future demand for three broad medical disciplines: general practitioners, medical specialist, and surgical specialists. The supply side of the model employs a stock/flow approach and exploits time-series and other data for variables, such as emigration, international medical graduates (IMGs), medical school entrants, retirements, mortality, and so on, which in turn allow us to access a host of policy parameters.
Under the status quo assumption, demand for physician services will outstrip the growth in supply for all three specialties.
The model can simulate supply-side policy changes (e.g. more IMGs, delayed retirements) and can also reflect changes in demand (e.g. a cure for leukemia; different work intensities for physicians). The model is highly parameterized so that it can accommodate shocks that may influence the future requirements for physicians. Once a future requirement is determined, the supply model can identify the policy levers (new entrants, immigration, emigration, retirement) necessary to close the gap between demand and supply. The model is a user-friendly tool made for policy makers to formulate appropriate physician workforce planning.
PubMed ID
16285405 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of the impact of socio-economic factors on the health state of the population of the Sverdlovsk region in the system of social-hygienic monitoring].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104743
Source
Gig Sanit. 2013 Nov-Dec;(6):87-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
T M Derstuganova
B T VelichkovskiI
A N Varaksin
V B Gurvich
O L Malykh
N I Kochneva
S V Iarushin
Source
Gig Sanit. 2013 Nov-Dec;(6):87-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death
Demography
Economics, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
There was investigated the impact of socioeconomic factors on medical and demographic processes in working age population. For the assessment of the impact of living conditions and environmental factors on mortality rate in a population of the Sverdlovsk region factor-typological, correlation and regression analyzes were applied There was shown an availability of statistically significant correlation relationships between mortality of the population of working age and socio-economic characteristics (degree of home improvement, quality of medical care, the level of social tension, the level of the demographic load), as well as between their increments with taking into account the time shifts. The effect of the value of the purchasing power on the mortality rate of the working population has been established The purchasing power was shown to be connected with a mortality rate of working population from external causes more stronger than death from all causes.
PubMed ID
24624831 View in PubMed
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155 records – page 1 of 16.