Skip header and navigation

Refine By

20 records – page 2 of 2.

Health and society in Chukotka: an overview.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115335
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:20469
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Alexey A Dudarev
Valery S Chupakhin
Jon Øyvind Odland
Author Affiliation
Northwest Public Health Research Centre, St. Petersburg, Russia. alexey.d@inbox.ru
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:20469
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Climate
Delivery of Health Care
Economic development
Health status
Humans
Industry
Mortality
Population Dynamics
Research
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study provides a historical overview of the changes in the socio-economic and health status of the population of Chukotka, from the Soviet to the post-Soviet period, with special attention paid to the circumstances of indigenous people. Past health studies in Chukotka are reviewed and key demographic and health indicator data presented. Since the 1990s, Chukotka's population has shrunk to a third of its former size due to emigration of non-indigenous and mostly younger people, with a corresponding increase in the mortality rate due to aging of the population. However, the indigenous population has remained stable. Among the most important causes of mortality are injuries. The living conditions of indigenous people continue to be a cause of concern, beset by high rates of poverty, unemployment, alcoholism, suicide and a variety of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis and sexually transmitted infections. The economy, general infrastructure and health care system of Chukotka have been considerably improved by the Abramovich administration in the 2000s.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):584-9322152597
Cites: Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1996 Jan-Mar;(1):52-48700016
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Sep;63(3):235-4215526927
Cites: Probl Tuberk. 2002;(3):3-612066530
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Jan;83(1):58-6914678087
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1992 Aug;21(4):730-61521978
Cites: BMC Cancer. 2005;5:8216029510
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Suppl 1:325-810093300
PubMed ID
23518623 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hypothesis: the reversal of the relation between economic growth and health progress in Sweden in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries was caused by electrification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257008
Source
Electromagn Biol Med. 2014 Jan;33(1):11-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Samuel Milham
Author Affiliation
Retired Washington State Health Department , Olympia, WA , USA.
Source
Electromagn Biol Med. 2014 Jan;33(1):11-4
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Economic development
Electricity - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Health - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Life expectancy
Sweden
Abstract
The expected decline of health indicators with economic recessions and improvement with economic growth in the nineteenth century Sweden was reversed in the twentieth century, giving the counterintuitive pattern of higher mortality and lower life expectancy in economic expansions and improvement of these indices in recessions. The change or "tipping point" occurred at the end of the nineteenth century or early in the twentieth century when electrification was introduced into Sweden. All 5 of the reversals of annual industrial electric energy use in the US between 1912 and 1970 were accompanied by recessions with lowered GDP, increased unemployment, decreased mortality and increased life expectancy. The health indices were not related to residential electricity use. The mortality improvement between 1931 and 1932 by state in the US strongly favored urban areas over rural areas. Rural unemployment by state in 1930 was significantly positively correlated with residential electrification percentage by state in 1930. The health effects of economic change are mediated by electrical exposure.
PubMed ID
23803154 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lifecycle effects of a recession on health behaviors: Boom, bust, and recovery in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276585
Source
Econ Hum Biol. 2016 Mar;20:90-107
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Tinna Laufey Ásgeirsdóttir
Hope Corman
Kelly Noonan
Nancy E Reichman
Source
Econ Hum Biol. 2016 Mar;20:90-107
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - economics - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Diet - adverse effects - economics - trends
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects - economics
Economic Development - trends
Economic Recession
Fast Foods - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Iceland
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Smoking - economics - epidemiology
Sunbathing - economics - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
This study uses individual-level longitudinal data from Iceland, a country that experienced a severe economic crisis in 2008 and substantial recovery by 2012, to investigate the extent to which the effects of a recession on health behaviors are lingering or short-lived and to explore trajectories in health behaviors from pre-crisis boom, to crisis, to recovery. Health-compromising behaviors (smoking, heavy drinking, sugared soft drinks, sweets, fast food, and tanning) declined during the crisis, and all but sweets continued to decline during the recovery. Health-promoting behaviors (consumption of fruit, fish oil, and vitamins/minerals and getting recommended sleep) followed more idiosyncratic paths. Overall, most behaviors reverted back to their pre-crisis levels or trends during the recovery, and these short-term deviations in trajectories were probably too short-lived in this recession to have major impacts on health or mortality. A notable exception is for binge drinking, which declined by 10% during the 2 crisis years, continued to fall (at a slower rate of 8%) during the 3 recovery years, and did not revert back to the upward pre-crisis trend during our observation period. These lingering effects, which directionally run counter to the pre-crisis upward trend in consumption and do not reflect price increases during the recovery period, suggest that alcohol is a potential pathway by which recessions improve health and/or reduce mortality.
PubMed ID
26687768 View in PubMed
Less detail
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Polar View
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Research
Data Sources
Economic Development
Remote Sensing Technology
Public Policy
Arctic Regions
Conservation of Natural Resources
Abstract
Polar View is an earth observation (EO) or satellite remote-sensing program focused on both the Arctic and the Antarctic. Polar View is supported by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Commission with participation from the Canadian Space Agency. It promotes the utilization of satellites for public good and in support of public policy in the areas of sustainable economic development, marine safety, and the environment.
Online Resources
Less detail

Progress towards universal health coverage in BRICS: translating economic growth into better health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272142
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2014 Jun 1;92(6):429-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2014
Author
Krishna D Rao
Varduhi Petrosyan
Edson Correia Araujo
Diane McIntyre
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2014 Jun 1;92(6):429-35
Date
Jun-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brazil
China
Economic development
Health Care Costs
Health Care Reform
Healthcare Financing
Humans
India
Interinstitutional Relations
Resource Allocation - economics
Russia
South Africa
Universal Coverage
Abstract
Brazil, the Russian Federation, India, China and South Africa--the countries known as BRICS--represent some of the world's fastest growing large economies and nearly 40% of the world's population. Over the last two decades, BRICS have undertaken health-system reforms to make progress towards universal health coverage. This paper discusses three key aspects of these reforms: the role of government in financing health; the underlying motivation behind the reforms; and the value of the lessons learnt for non-BRICS countries. Although national governments have played a prominent role in the reforms, private financing constitutes a major share of health spending in BRICS. There is a reliance on direct expenditures in China and India and a substantial presence of private insurance in Brazil and South Africa. The Brazilian health reforms resulted from a political movement that made health a constitutional right, whereas those in China, India, the Russian Federation and South Africa were an attempt to improve the performance of the public system and reduce inequities in access. The move towards universal health coverage has been slow. In China and India, the reforms have not adequately addressed the issue of out-of-pocket payments. Negotiations between national and subnational entities have often been challenging but Brazil has been able to achieve good coordination between federal and state entities via a constitutional delineation of responsibility. In the Russian Federation, poor coordination has led to the fragmented pooling and inefficient use of resources. In mixed health systems it is essential to harness both public and private sector resources.
Notes
Cites: Indian J Public Health. 2005 Jul-Sep;49(3):138-4016468277
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 2008 Mar-Apr;27(2):460-818332503
Cites: Lancet. 2013 Mar 30;381(9872):1145-5523541055
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2012 Nov 1;90(11):867-823226900
Cites: Health Policy Plan. 2012 May;27(3):213-2121486910
Cites: Health Syst Transit. 2011;13(7):1-190, xiii-xiv22455875
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Mar 3;379(9818):833-4222386036
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2011 Aug;73(3):359-6621733610
Cites: Lancet. 2011 May 21;377(9779):1778-9721561655
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Sep 5;374(9692):817-3419709728
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Oct 3;374(9696):1186-9519801097
Cites: Lancet. 2010 Mar 27;375(9720):1120-3020346818
Cites: Health Econ Policy Law. 2010 Apr;5(2):135-4720226116
PubMed ID
24940017 View in PubMed
Less detail

Renewable energy consumption and economic growth in nine OECD countries: bounds test approach and causality analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257976
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2014;2014:919167
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lin Hung-Pin
Author Affiliation
Department of International Business & Trade, Shu-Te University, No. 59, Hun Shan Road, Yen Chau, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan.
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2014;2014:919167
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Causality
Conservation of Energy Resources - economics - trends
Denmark
Economic Development - trends
France
Germany
Great Britain
Humans
Italy
Japan
Portugal
Renewable Energy - economics
Spain
United States
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to investigate the short-run and long-run causality between renewable energy (RE) consumption and economic growth (EG) in nine OECD countries from the period between 1982 and 2011. To examine the linkage, this paper uses the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) bounds testing approach of cointegration test and vector error-correction models to test the causal relationship between variables. The co-integration and causal relationships are found in five countries-United States of America (USA), Japan, Germany, Italy, and United Kingdom (UK). The overall results indicate that (1) a short-run unidirectional causality runs from EG to RE in Italy and UK; (2) long-run unidirectional causalities run from RE to EG for Germany, Italy, and UK; (3) a long-run unidirectional causality runs from EG to RE in USA, and Japan; (4) both long-run and strong unidirectional causalities run from RE to EG for Germany and UK; and (5) Finally, both long-run and strong unidirectional causalities run from EG to RE in only USA. Further evidence reveals that policies for renewable energy conservation may have no impact on economic growth in France, Denmark, Portugal, and Spain.
PubMed ID
24558343 View in PubMed
Less detail

Statement on Canada's Arctic Foreign Policy: Exercising Sovereignty and Promoting Canada’s Northern Strategy Abroad.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301411
Source
Government of Canada.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2010
social and economic development, Arctic science and research, environmental protection, the operations of the Canadian Forces or the activities of the Canadian Coast Guard and Royal Canadian Mounted Police. We exer- cise our sovereignty in the Arctic through our laws and regulations, as we do through
  1 document  
Source
Government of Canada.
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
3357676
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Environment
Economic development
Social development
Indigenous peoples
Documents

canada_arctic_foreign_policy-eng.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2015 Nov-Dec;(6):9-13
Publication Type
Article
Author
E A Tishuk
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2015 Nov-Dec;(6):9-13
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Economic Development - trends
Humans
Public Health - standards
Russia
Social Change
Abstract
The analysis was carried out concerning impact of cyclicity of social economic development on population health of the Russian Federation. The conclusions are made related to necessity of determining priorities of development of national system of population health care.
PubMed ID
27116830 View in PubMed
Less detail

Trends in Greenlandic Inuit teenager pregnancy rates

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76527
Source
Pages 159-161 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
, trends in birth rates in th~ 1950s and 1960$, and the later decline of fertility in the course of economic development and modernization have been thoroug~ly scrutinized by H. 0. Hansen- (13). The remarkable decline in birth rates at the end t>f the 1960s was facilitated by the introdu~tion of
  1 document  
Author
Hansen, P. K.
Smith, S. F.
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark
Source
Pages 159-161 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Date
1985
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Abortion rates
Birth rates
Economic development
Fertility rate
Maternal and child health
Teenage pregnancy
Documents
Less detail

[Working potential losses in water transport workers and economic parameters in Sakhalin region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146411
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2010;(12):18-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2010;(12):18-22
Date
2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Economic Development - statistics & numerical data
Gross Domestic Product - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Abstract
The authors demonstrated influence of economic growth in Sakhalin region in 2001-2005 on lower working potential losses among water transport workers in 2004-2008. Findings are significant negative correlation between real gross domestic regional product of Sakhalin region and working potential losses among water transport workers, and very strong negative correlation with premature death.
PubMed ID
21442936 View in PubMed
Less detail

20 records – page 2 of 2.