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Economic growth and the demand for dietary quality: Evidence from Russia during transition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276165
Source
Econ Hum Biol. 2015 Dec;19:184-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Christine Burggraf
Ramona Teuber
Stephan Brosig
Thomas Glauben
Source
Econ Hum Biol. 2015 Dec;19:184-203
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Fats
Economic Development - statistics & numerical data
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Models, Econometric
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Overweight - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Thinness - epidemiology
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
The increasing incidence of nutrition-related chronic diseases worldwide has raised people's awareness of dietary quality. Most existing studies on the topic of changing nutrition patterns measure dietary quality by single macronutrient indicators or anthropometric outcomes. However, such an approach is often too narrow to provide a picture of overall dietary quality and is sometimes even misleading. This study contributes to the existing literature by taking into account that the analysis of dietary quality comprises two dimensions: the adequate intake of vitamins and minerals, as well as the moderate intake of nutrients that increase the risk of chronic diseases. Thereby, we apply Grossman's health investment model to the analysis of the demand for dietary quality, explicitly addressing the different dimensions of dietary quality and the intertemporal character of health investments. We apply our approach to Russia using data from the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey from 1996 to 2008. Our results show that intake levels of vitamins and minerals as well as saturated and total fatty acids increased after 1998 along with economic recovery, while the intake of fiber decreased. Our econometric results imply an income elasticity of vitamins and minerals of 0.051, and an income elasticity of fats of 0.073. Overall, our results are in line with an ongoing nutrition transition in the Russian Federation, which is marked by decreasing deficiencies in vitamins and minerals, as well as the increasing consumption of fats with its accompanying negative health consequences.
PubMed ID
26469973 View in PubMed
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Health and society in Chukotka: an overview.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115335
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:20469
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Alexey A Dudarev
Valery S Chupakhin
Jon Øyvind Odland
Author Affiliation
Northwest Public Health Research Centre, St. Petersburg, Russia. alexey.d@inbox.ru
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:20469
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Climate
Delivery of Health Care
Economic development
Health status
Humans
Industry
Mortality
Population Dynamics
Research
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study provides a historical overview of the changes in the socio-economic and health status of the population of Chukotka, from the Soviet to the post-Soviet period, with special attention paid to the circumstances of indigenous people. Past health studies in Chukotka are reviewed and key demographic and health indicator data presented. Since the 1990s, Chukotka's population has shrunk to a third of its former size due to emigration of non-indigenous and mostly younger people, with a corresponding increase in the mortality rate due to aging of the population. However, the indigenous population has remained stable. Among the most important causes of mortality are injuries. The living conditions of indigenous people continue to be a cause of concern, beset by high rates of poverty, unemployment, alcoholism, suicide and a variety of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis and sexually transmitted infections. The economy, general infrastructure and health care system of Chukotka have been considerably improved by the Abramovich administration in the 2000s.
Notes
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Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Suppl 1:325-810093300
PubMed ID
23518623 View in PubMed
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