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Culturally appropriate vegetables and economic development. A contextual analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125094
Source
Appetite. 2012 Aug;59(1):148-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Bamidele Adekunle
Glen Filson
Sridharan Sethuratnam
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Design and Rural Development, 50 Stone Road East, University of Guelph, Canada N1G 2W1. badekunl@uoguelph.ca
Source
Appetite. 2012 Aug;59(1):148-54
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Crops, Agricultural - economics - supply & distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Economic development
Ethnic Groups
Family Characteristics
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario - ethnology
Questionnaires
Vegetables - economics
Abstract
This paper examines the implications of the demand for ethno-cultural vegetables (ECV) by South-Asians, the largest cultural group in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), on their potential for Ontario agricultural economic development and significant consumer health benefits. A conceptual framework is presented to explain the relationship among factors such as change in demographics, demand for locally produced ECV and both the potential agricultural and health benefits. Analysis of cross-sectional data collected in 2009 also indicates that the respondents have certain characteristics that are pertinent to understanding why they shop in particular stores and their perceptions about what constitutes quality. In sum, household size and percentage spent on vegetables predict their expenditure on ECV, an indication that South-Asians resident in the GTA will continue to demand their ECV. It is thus a niche market that farmers can explore if its potential economic value to them is clarified and the government can provide sufficient support by increasing awareness and creating appropriate economic incentives for farmers willing to grow these vegetables.
PubMed ID
22516843 View in PubMed
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