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Health and society in Chukotka: an overview.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115335
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:20469
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Alexey A Dudarev
Valery S Chupakhin
Jon Øyvind Odland
Author Affiliation
Northwest Public Health Research Centre, St. Petersburg, Russia. alexey.d@inbox.ru
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:20469
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Climate
Delivery of Health Care
Economic development
Health status
Humans
Industry
Mortality
Population Dynamics
Research
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study provides a historical overview of the changes in the socio-economic and health status of the population of Chukotka, from the Soviet to the post-Soviet period, with special attention paid to the circumstances of indigenous people. Past health studies in Chukotka are reviewed and key demographic and health indicator data presented. Since the 1990s, Chukotka's population has shrunk to a third of its former size due to emigration of non-indigenous and mostly younger people, with a corresponding increase in the mortality rate due to aging of the population. However, the indigenous population has remained stable. Among the most important causes of mortality are injuries. The living conditions of indigenous people continue to be a cause of concern, beset by high rates of poverty, unemployment, alcoholism, suicide and a variety of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis and sexually transmitted infections. The economy, general infrastructure and health care system of Chukotka have been considerably improved by the Abramovich administration in the 2000s.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):584-9322152597
Cites: Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1996 Jan-Mar;(1):52-48700016
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Sep;63(3):235-4215526927
Cites: Probl Tuberk. 2002;(3):3-612066530
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Jan;83(1):58-6914678087
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1992 Aug;21(4):730-61521978
Cites: BMC Cancer. 2005;5:8216029510
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Suppl 1:325-810093300
PubMed ID
23518623 View in PubMed
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Lifecycle effects of a recession on health behaviors: Boom, bust, and recovery in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276585
Source
Econ Hum Biol. 2016 Mar;20:90-107
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Tinna Laufey Ásgeirsdóttir
Hope Corman
Kelly Noonan
Nancy E Reichman
Source
Econ Hum Biol. 2016 Mar;20:90-107
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - economics - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Diet - adverse effects - economics - trends
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects - economics
Economic Development - trends
Economic Recession
Fast Foods - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Iceland
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Smoking - economics - epidemiology
Sunbathing - economics - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
This study uses individual-level longitudinal data from Iceland, a country that experienced a severe economic crisis in 2008 and substantial recovery by 2012, to investigate the extent to which the effects of a recession on health behaviors are lingering or short-lived and to explore trajectories in health behaviors from pre-crisis boom, to crisis, to recovery. Health-compromising behaviors (smoking, heavy drinking, sugared soft drinks, sweets, fast food, and tanning) declined during the crisis, and all but sweets continued to decline during the recovery. Health-promoting behaviors (consumption of fruit, fish oil, and vitamins/minerals and getting recommended sleep) followed more idiosyncratic paths. Overall, most behaviors reverted back to their pre-crisis levels or trends during the recovery, and these short-term deviations in trajectories were probably too short-lived in this recession to have major impacts on health or mortality. A notable exception is for binge drinking, which declined by 10% during the 2 crisis years, continued to fall (at a slower rate of 8%) during the 3 recovery years, and did not revert back to the upward pre-crisis trend during our observation period. These lingering effects, which directionally run counter to the pre-crisis upward trend in consumption and do not reflect price increases during the recovery period, suggest that alcohol is a potential pathway by which recessions improve health and/or reduce mortality.
PubMed ID
26687768 View in PubMed
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Trends in Greenlandic Inuit teenager pregnancy rates

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76527
Source
Pages 159-161 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
, trends in birth rates in th~ 1950s and 1960$, and the later decline of fertility in the course of economic development and modernization have been thoroug~ly scrutinized by H. 0. Hansen- (13). The remarkable decline in birth rates at the end t>f the 1960s was facilitated by the introdu~tion of
  1 document  
Author
Hansen, P. K.
Smith, S. F.
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark
Source
Pages 159-161 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Date
1985
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Abortion rates
Birth rates
Economic development
Fertility rate
Maternal and child health
Teenage pregnancy
Documents
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