Skip header and navigation

1 records – page 1 of 1.

Lifecycle effects of a recession on health behaviors: Boom, bust, and recovery in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276585
Source
Econ Hum Biol. 2016 Mar;20:90-107
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Tinna Laufey Ásgeirsdóttir
Hope Corman
Kelly Noonan
Nancy E Reichman
Source
Econ Hum Biol. 2016 Mar;20:90-107
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - economics - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Diet - adverse effects - economics - trends
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects - economics
Economic Development - trends
Economic Recession
Fast Foods - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Iceland
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Smoking - economics - epidemiology
Sunbathing - economics - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
This study uses individual-level longitudinal data from Iceland, a country that experienced a severe economic crisis in 2008 and substantial recovery by 2012, to investigate the extent to which the effects of a recession on health behaviors are lingering or short-lived and to explore trajectories in health behaviors from pre-crisis boom, to crisis, to recovery. Health-compromising behaviors (smoking, heavy drinking, sugared soft drinks, sweets, fast food, and tanning) declined during the crisis, and all but sweets continued to decline during the recovery. Health-promoting behaviors (consumption of fruit, fish oil, and vitamins/minerals and getting recommended sleep) followed more idiosyncratic paths. Overall, most behaviors reverted back to their pre-crisis levels or trends during the recovery, and these short-term deviations in trajectories were probably too short-lived in this recession to have major impacts on health or mortality. A notable exception is for binge drinking, which declined by 10% during the 2 crisis years, continued to fall (at a slower rate of 8%) during the 3 recovery years, and did not revert back to the upward pre-crisis trend during our observation period. These lingering effects, which directionally run counter to the pre-crisis upward trend in consumption and do not reflect price increases during the recovery period, suggest that alcohol is a potential pathway by which recessions improve health and/or reduce mortality.
PubMed ID
26687768 View in PubMed
Less detail