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The Arctic: the new business hotspot or a sustainable prosperity project of co-management?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297053
Source
Arctic Summer College. Fellow Paper. 16 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
that focus on the indigenous perspective, in which economy and culture are more closely intertwined. The benefits of the Arctic emerging economy may be seen in the creation of economic development, but it must be part of a sustainable prosperity project of co- management with triple gain to
  1 document  
Author
Arruda, Gisele
Source
Arctic Summer College. Fellow Paper. 16 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
510521
Keywords
Climate change
Economic development
Indigenous populations
Resource development
Abstract
The Arctic plays a key role in the global climate. As the ice retreats the current challenges concerning the environment, maritime safety, tourism and oil and gas activity will intensify even more the effects of climate change on Arctic ecosystems and communities. Climate change and modernization have thus become two intrinsically linked forces that severely alter the context in which the indigenous populations of the region sustain a livelihood (van Voorst, 2009). Local animal and plant species are of dietary importance, while hunting, fishing or foraging are all of cultural and social value. The availability of many species that the Arctic indigenous people rely on for food has become limited due to climate change and the receding ice cover. The assessment of potential impacts of resource development should to some extent rely on traditional knowledge and could benefit climate change researchers in Western academia and policy-making circles as well as help the indigenous communities to tackle the difficult task of promoting their local adaptation. A joint assessment and management on impacts issues must be performed based on mutual consent, information exchange, responsible coordination and cooperation. Social impact assessment (SIAs) serve as means of determining how and to what extent specialized social groups will become better or worse off as a result of certain externally generated actions. Assessments have been largely about indigenous people, not by them (Cochran et al, 2013:558). This is why it becomes crucial to enrich SIAs with detail and context that focus on the indigenous perspective, in which economy and culture are more closely intertwined. The benefits of the Arctic emerging economy may be seen in the creation of economic development, but it must be part of a sustainable prosperity project of comanagement with triple gain to economy, environment and communities.
Documents

ASC-Paper_Arruda_Gisele.pdf

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Canada's relationship with Inuit : a history of policy and program development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294623
Source
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
June 2006
agreements, housing, healthcare, education, economic development, self-government, the environment and urban issues. In order to develop meaningful forward-looking policy, it is essential to understand what has come before and how we got to where we are. We believe that this book will be a valuable
  1 document  
Author
Bonesteel, Sarah
Source
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada.
Date
June 2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
16013414
Keywords
Inuit
History
Housing
Health care
Education
Economic development
Self-governement
Environment
Notes
ISBN: 978-1-100-11121-6
Documents

inuit-book_1100100016901_eng.pdf

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Canadian Inuit use of caribou and Swedish Sami use of reindeer in entrepreneurship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297035
Source
University of Canterbury. 460 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2015
....................................................................... 2 1.1.1 Value of Comparative Studies ........................................................ 2 1.1.2 Global Changes Affecting High Latitudes Peoples........................... 6 1.1.3 Importance of Entrepreneurship and Economic Development for Canadian Inuit
  1 document  
Author
Mason, Aldene Helen Meis
Source
University of Canterbury. 460 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
8230174
Keywords
Reindeer herding
Entrepreneurship
Economic development
Inuit
Sami
Subsistence hunting
Documents

MeisMason_thesis_fulltext.pdf

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Carbon prices and incentives for technological development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266280
Source
J Environ Manage. 2015 Mar 1;150:393-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2015
Author
Tommy Lundgren
Per-Olov Marklund
Eva Samakovlis
Wenchao Zhou
Source
J Environ Manage. 2015 Mar 1;150:393-403
Date
Mar-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - prevention & control
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Economic development
Humans
Industrial Waste - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Models, Theoretical
Paper
Sweden
Taxes
Abstract
There is concern that the carbon prices generated through climate policies are too low to create the incentives necessary to stimulate technological development. This paper empirically analyzes how the Swedish carbon dioxide (CO2) tax and the European Union emission trading system (EU ETS) have affected productivity development in the Swedish pulp and paper industry 1998-2008. A Luenberger total factor productivity (TFP) indicator is computed using data envelopment analysis. The results show that climate policy had a modest impact on technological development in the pulp and paper industry, and if significant it was negative. The price of fossil fuels, on the contrary, seems to have created important incentives for technological development. Hence, the results suggest that the carbon prices faced by the industry through EU ETS and the CO2 tax have been too low. Even though the data for this study is specific for Sweden, the models and results are applicable internationally. When designing policy to mitigate CO2 emissions, it is vital that the policy creates a carbon price that is high enough - otherwise the pressure on technological development will not be sufficiently strong.
PubMed ID
25560661 View in PubMed
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Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288436
Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES)
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Governments and Organizations
United States
Economic Development
Climate
Abstract
C2ESbrings together business leaders, policy makers, scientists, and other experts to work together to protect the climate while sustaining economic growth.
Online Resources
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Culturally appropriate vegetables and economic development. A contextual analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125094
Source
Appetite. 2012 Aug;59(1):148-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Bamidele Adekunle
Glen Filson
Sridharan Sethuratnam
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Design and Rural Development, 50 Stone Road East, University of Guelph, Canada N1G 2W1. badekunl@uoguelph.ca
Source
Appetite. 2012 Aug;59(1):148-54
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Crops, Agricultural - economics - supply & distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Economic development
Ethnic Groups
Family Characteristics
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario - ethnology
Questionnaires
Vegetables - economics
Abstract
This paper examines the implications of the demand for ethno-cultural vegetables (ECV) by South-Asians, the largest cultural group in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), on their potential for Ontario agricultural economic development and significant consumer health benefits. A conceptual framework is presented to explain the relationship among factors such as change in demographics, demand for locally produced ECV and both the potential agricultural and health benefits. Analysis of cross-sectional data collected in 2009 also indicates that the respondents have certain characteristics that are pertinent to understanding why they shop in particular stores and their perceptions about what constitutes quality. In sum, household size and percentage spent on vegetables predict their expenditure on ECV, an indication that South-Asians resident in the GTA will continue to demand their ECV. It is thus a niche market that farmers can explore if its potential economic value to them is clarified and the government can provide sufficient support by increasing awareness and creating appropriate economic incentives for farmers willing to grow these vegetables.
PubMed ID
22516843 View in PubMed
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Economic growth and the demand for dietary quality: Evidence from Russia during transition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276165
Source
Econ Hum Biol. 2015 Dec;19:184-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Christine Burggraf
Ramona Teuber
Stephan Brosig
Thomas Glauben
Source
Econ Hum Biol. 2015 Dec;19:184-203
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Fats
Economic Development - statistics & numerical data
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Models, Econometric
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Overweight - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Thinness - epidemiology
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
The increasing incidence of nutrition-related chronic diseases worldwide has raised people's awareness of dietary quality. Most existing studies on the topic of changing nutrition patterns measure dietary quality by single macronutrient indicators or anthropometric outcomes. However, such an approach is often too narrow to provide a picture of overall dietary quality and is sometimes even misleading. This study contributes to the existing literature by taking into account that the analysis of dietary quality comprises two dimensions: the adequate intake of vitamins and minerals, as well as the moderate intake of nutrients that increase the risk of chronic diseases. Thereby, we apply Grossman's health investment model to the analysis of the demand for dietary quality, explicitly addressing the different dimensions of dietary quality and the intertemporal character of health investments. We apply our approach to Russia using data from the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey from 1996 to 2008. Our results show that intake levels of vitamins and minerals as well as saturated and total fatty acids increased after 1998 along with economic recovery, while the intake of fiber decreased. Our econometric results imply an income elasticity of vitamins and minerals of 0.051, and an income elasticity of fats of 0.073. Overall, our results are in line with an ongoing nutrition transition in the Russian Federation, which is marked by decreasing deficiencies in vitamins and minerals, as well as the increasing consumption of fats with its accompanying negative health consequences.
PubMed ID
26469973 View in PubMed
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Expansion and retrenchment of the Swedish welfare state: a long-term approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265901
Source
Int J Health Serv. 2015;45(2):226-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Luis Buendía
Source
Int J Health Serv. 2015;45(2):226-45
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Economic Development - trends
Economic Recession
Humans
Politics
Public Policy
Social Welfare - economics - trends
Sweden
Taxes - economics
Abstract
In this article, we will undertake a long-term analysis of the evolution of the Swedish welfare state, seeking to explain that evolution through the use of a systemic approach. That is, our approach will consider the interrelations between economic growth (EG), the sociopolitical institutional framework (IF), and the welfare state (WS)-understood as a set of institutions embracing the labor market and its regulation, the tax system, and the so-called social wage-in order to find the main variables that elucidate its evolution. We will show that the expansive phase of the Swedish welfare state can be explained by the symbiotic relationships developed in the WS-EG-IF interaction, whereas the period of welfare state retrenchment is one result of changes operating within the sociopolitical IF and EG bases.
PubMed ID
25813499 View in PubMed
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Health and society in Chukotka: an overview.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115335
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:20469
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Alexey A Dudarev
Valery S Chupakhin
Jon Øyvind Odland
Author Affiliation
Northwest Public Health Research Centre, St. Petersburg, Russia. alexey.d@inbox.ru
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:20469
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Climate
Delivery of Health Care
Economic development
Health status
Humans
Industry
Mortality
Population Dynamics
Research
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study provides a historical overview of the changes in the socio-economic and health status of the population of Chukotka, from the Soviet to the post-Soviet period, with special attention paid to the circumstances of indigenous people. Past health studies in Chukotka are reviewed and key demographic and health indicator data presented. Since the 1990s, Chukotka's population has shrunk to a third of its former size due to emigration of non-indigenous and mostly younger people, with a corresponding increase in the mortality rate due to aging of the population. However, the indigenous population has remained stable. Among the most important causes of mortality are injuries. The living conditions of indigenous people continue to be a cause of concern, beset by high rates of poverty, unemployment, alcoholism, suicide and a variety of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis and sexually transmitted infections. The economy, general infrastructure and health care system of Chukotka have been considerably improved by the Abramovich administration in the 2000s.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):584-9322152597
Cites: Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1996 Jan-Mar;(1):52-48700016
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Sep;63(3):235-4215526927
Cites: Probl Tuberk. 2002;(3):3-612066530
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Jan;83(1):58-6914678087
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1992 Aug;21(4):730-61521978
Cites: BMC Cancer. 2005;5:8216029510
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Suppl 1:325-810093300
PubMed ID
23518623 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.