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108 records – page 1 of 11.

Acute care hospital strategic priorities: perceptions of challenges, control, competition and collaboration in Ontario's evolving healthcare system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173511
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):36-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Adalsteinn D Brown
L Miin Alikhan
Guillermo A Sandoval
Neil Seeman
G Ross Baker
George H Pink
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto.
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):36-47
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chief Executive Officers, Hospital - psychology
Cooperative Behavior
Economic Competition
Health Care Surveys
Health Priorities
Hospital Planning - economics - trends
Humans
National Health Programs - trends
Ontario
Organizational Innovation
Abstract
To explore the current and pending strategic agenda of Ontario hospitals (the largest consumers of the provincial healthcare budget), a survey of Ontario acute care hospital CEOs was conducted in January 2004. The survey, with an 82% response rate, identifies 29 strategic priorities under seven key strategic themes consistent across different hospital types. These themes include (1) human resources cultivation, (2) service integration and partnerships, (3) consumer engagement, (4) corporate governance and management, (5) organizational efficiency and redesign, (6) improved information use for decision-making, (7) patient care management. The extent to which an individual hospital's control over strategic resolutions is perceived may affect multilevel strategic priority-setting and action-planning. In addition to supporting ongoing development of meaningful performance measures and information critical to strategic decision-making, this study's findings may facilitate a better understanding of hospitals' key resource commitments, the extent of competition and collaboration for key resources, the perceived degree of individual control over strategic issue resolution and where systemic resolutions may be required.
PubMed ID
16078398 View in PubMed
Less detail

Administrative costs: answering the critics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224801
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 1992;11(2):231-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
P M Danzon
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 1992;11(2):231-3
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Economic Competition
Humans
Insurance Carriers - economics
Insurance, Health - economics
Models, Econometric
United States
Notes
Comment On: Health Aff (Millwood). 1992 Spring;11(1):44-611445524
PubMed ID
1500054 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol prices, beverage quality, and the demand for alcohol: quality substitutions and price elasticities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76088
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2006 Jan;30(1):96-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Paul J Gruenewald
William R Ponicki
Harold D Holder
Anders Romelsjö
Author Affiliation
Prevention Research Center, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA. paul@prev.org
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2006 Jan;30(1):96-105
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - economics - prevention & control
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - standards - supply & distribution
Choice Behavior
Commerce - economics
Economic Competition - economics
Humans
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Taxes - economics
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although the published literature on alcohol beverage taxes, prices, sales, and related problems treats alcoholic beverages as a simple good, alcohol is a complex good composed of different beverage types (i.e., beer, wine, and spirits) and quality brands (e.g., high-, medium-, and low-quality beers). As a complex good, consumers may make substitutions between purchases of different beverage types and brands in response to price increases. For this reason, the availability of a broad range of beverage prices provides opportunities for consumers to mitigate the effects of average price increases through quality substitutions; a change in beverage choice in response to price increases to maintain consumption. METHODS: Using Swedish price and sales data provided by Systembolaget for the years 1984 through 1994, this study assessed the relationships between alcohol beverage prices, beverage quality, and alcohol sales. The study examined price effects on alcohol consumption using seemingly unrelated regression equations to model the impacts of price increases within 9 empirically defined quality classes across beverage types. The models enabled statistical assessments of both own-price and cross-price effects between types and classes. RESULTS: The results of these analyses showed that consumers respond to price increases by altering their total consumption and by varying their brand choices. Significant reductions in sales were observed in response to price increases, but these effects were mitigated by significant substitutions between quality classes. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that the net impacts of purposeful price policy to reduce consumption will depend on how such policies affect the range of prices across beverage brands.
PubMed ID
16433736 View in PubMed
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Analysis of workforce, distribution of care, and practice preference in pediatric plastic surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201676
Source
J Craniofac Surg. 1999 Jan;10(1):3-9; discussion 10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
S E Brotherton
M B Habal
Author Affiliation
American Academy of Pediatrics, Elk Grove, Illinois 60007-1098, USA.
Source
J Craniofac Surg. 1999 Jan;10(1):3-9; discussion 10
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Economic Competition
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Middle Aged
Pediatrics - education - manpower
Physician's Practice Patterns
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
Societies, Medical
Surgery, Oral - manpower
Surgery, Plastic - education - manpower
United States
Abstract
To determine the future needs in manpower for pediatric care as it relates to pediatric specialists, a study was conducted by the American Academy of Pediatrics to see the needs of manpower that will provide access of pediatric care to all. A pediatric plastic surgery survey was set in the form of a list of questions that was mailed to the respective societies with pediatric plastic surgeons as members. The survey was reviewed, and the results were studied. The outcome is presented in the form of findings related to the overall practice of plastic surgery. Based on the percentage of pediatric care that is provided, there were two types of pediatric plastic surgeons. Those with the high percentage of pediatric care tend to stay near health science centers; however, both groups tend to spend time (each to a different extent) tending to other plastic surgery problems. Today we have adequate access to care in the health system for pediatric plastic surgery problems despite the shift in the health care environment. Managed care continues to use the pediatrician as a "gatekeeper" in determining the overall access for patients with problems related to pediatric plastic surgery.
PubMed ID
10388420 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Andrew Pattullo lecture. Healthy populations or healthy institutions: the dilemma of health care management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212676
Source
J Health Adm Educ. 1995;13(3):453-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995

[Community health legislation--for good and bad].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232303
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1988 Oct 25;108(29B):2624-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-25-1988

108 records – page 1 of 11.