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769 records – page 1 of 77.

A 10-year survey of blood culture negative endocarditis in Sweden: aminoglycoside therapy is important for survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93395
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2008;40(4):279-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Werner Maria
Andersson Rune
Olaison Lars
Hogevik Harriet
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, South Alvsborg Hospital, Borås, Sweden. maria.werner@vgregion.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2008;40(4):279-85
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aminoglycosides - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Blood - microbiology
Culture Media
Echocardiography
Endocarditis, Bacterial - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We estimated the prevalence of blood culture negative endocarditis (CNE) and described and analysed data with special attention to antibiotic treatment from patients with infective endocarditis (IE) reported to the Swedish endocarditis registry during the 10-y period 1995-2004. All 29 departments of infectious diseases in Sweden reported data to the registry. During the 10-y period, 2509 IE episodes (78% Duke definite) were identified in 2410 patients. 304 CNE episodes (25% Duke definite) were found. The proportion of CNE was measured to be 12% of all IE episodes. Fatal outcome occurred in 10.7% of all IE patients and in 5% of the CNE patients. The risk of dying was significantly increased in female (9%) compared to male (2%) CNE patients (OR 5.1). Mortality was significantly decreased in patients treated with an aminoglycoside (3%) versus patients without aminoglycoside therapy (13%), OR 0.2. In conclusion, the prevalence of CNE was 12% in Swedish IE patients in a 10-y survey. The mortality in IE was low (10.7%) and 4.6% for CNE. Women have higher mortality rates than men in CNE. CNE patients who received aminoglycoside therapy survived more frequently than CNE patients without this therapy.
PubMed ID
18365919 View in PubMed
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40 years after the first atrial switch procedure in patients with transposition of the great arteries: long-term results in Toronto and Zurich.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197150
Source
Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2000 Aug;48(4):233-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
E. Oechslin
R. Jenni
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, University Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland. erwin.oechslin@dim.usz.ch
Source
Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2000 Aug;48(4):233-7
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Actuarial Analysis
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - etiology
Cause of Death
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Echocardiography
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - etiology - mortality
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Quality of Life
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Switzerland - epidemiology
Time Factors
Transposition of Great Vessels - complications - mortality - psychology - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Dysfunction, Right - etiology - mortality
Abstract
The atrial switch procedure dramatically improved the prognosis of children with complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA). Overall actuarial survival was approximately 75% after 25 years and was better in patients with simple TGA than in those with complex TGA. Mortality by any cause (16%) and cardiovascular mortality (12% and 13%) were comparable in both centers. Progressive congestive heart failure and sudden death were the principal modes of death. Most of the survivors denied any symptoms or had mild limitations in their daily activities. However, long-term problems in this growing population of adults are challenging and include late arrhythmias (up to two thirds of the patients), systemic ventricular (SV) failure, systemic atrioventricular valve regurgitation and reoperations, such as baffle reconstruction, being the most frequent. Objective assessment of SV function obtained by echocardiography is difficult. It may include fractional area change and tricuspid annular motion. Survivors after an atrial switch procedure are unique and have a good quality of life. However, the definitive and true history of the RV supporting the systemic circulation is not as yet known.
PubMed ID
11005599 View in PubMed
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The 2000 Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension: part two--diagnosis and assessment of people with high blood pressure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192030
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2001 Dec;17(12):1249-63
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
K B Zarnke
M. Levine
F A McAlister
N R Campbell
M G Myers
D W McKay
P. Bolli
G. Honos
M. Lebel
K. Mann
T W Wilson
C. Abbott
S. Tobe
E. Burgess
S. Rabkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, London Health Sciences Centre, University of Western Ontario, 339 Windermere Road, London, Ontario N6A 5A5, Canada. Kelly.Zarnke@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2001 Dec;17(12):1249-63
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - complications
Adult
Blood Pressure Determination - methods - psychology - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods - standards
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - standards
Diabetes Complications
Diabetic Nephropathies - complications - diagnosis
Echocardiography - standards
Electrocardiography
Evidence-Based Medicine - methods
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Hypertension, Renovascular - diagnosis
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - complications - ultrasonography
Office Visits
Patient compliance
Pheochromocytoma - complications - diagnosis
Risk factors
Self Care - methods - standards
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of high blood pressure in adults.
For people with high blood pressure, the assignment of a diagnosis of hypertension depends on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the level of the blood pressure elevation, the duration of follow-up and the presence of concomitant vascular risk factors, target organ damage and established atherosclerotic diseases. For people diagnosed with hypertension, defining the overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires laboratory testing, a search for target organ damage and an assessment of the modifiable causes of hypertension. Out-of-clinic blood pressure assessment and echocardiography are options for selected patients.
People at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes and were identified and quantified.
Medline searches were conducted from the period of the last revision of the Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension (May 1998 to October 2000). Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify other studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised, using prespecified levels of evidence, by content experts and methodological experts.
A high value was placed on the identification of people at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
The identification of people at higher risk of cardiovascular disease will permit counselling for lifestyle manoeuvres and the introduction of antihypertensive drugs to reduce blood pressure for patients with sustained hypertension. In certain settings, and for specific classes of drugs, blood pressure lowering has been associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and/or mortality.
The present document contains detailed recommendations pertaining to aspects of the diagnosis and assessment of patients with hypertension, including the accurate measurement of blood pressure, criteria for the diagnosis of hypertension and recommendations for follow-up, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular hypertension, home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and the role of echocardiography in hypertension.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Recommendations Working Group. Only the recommendations achieving high levels of consensus are reported here. These guidelines will be updated annually.
These recommendations are endorsed by the Canadian Hypertension Society, The Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, The College of Family Physicians of Canada, The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, The Adult Disease Division and Bureau of Cardio-Respiratory Diseases and Diabetes at the Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control of Health Canada.
PubMed ID
11773936 View in PubMed
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The 2006 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part I--Blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168977
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):573-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2006
Author
B R Hemmelgarn
Finlay A McAlister
Steven Grover
Martin G Myers
Donald W McKay
Peter Bolli
Carl Abbott
Ernesto L Schiffrin
George Honos
Ellen Burgess
Karen Mann
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Arun Chockalingam
Rhian M Touyz
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, and Foothills Hospital, 1403 29th Street Northwest, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. brenda.hemmelgarn@calgaryhealthregion.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):573-81
Date
May-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Blood Pressure Determination
Canada
Echocardiography
Humans
Hyperaldosteronism - diagnosis
Hypertension - diagnosis
Mass Screening
Patient Education as Topic
Pheochromocytoma - diagnosis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with high blood pressure.
For persons in whom a high blood pressure value is recorded, a diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the level of the blood pressure elevation, the approach used to monitor blood pressure (office, ambulatory or home/self), and the duration of follow-up. In addition, the presence of cardiovascular risk factors and target organ damage should be assessed to determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment. For persons diagnosed as having hypertension, estimating the overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires an assessment for other vascular risk factors and hypertensive target organ damage.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2004 to October 2005 to update the 2005 recommendations. Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of the authors and subgroup members were used to identify other studies. Identified articles were reviewed and appraised using prespecified levels of evidence by content and methodological experts. As per previous years, the authors only included studies that had been published in the peer-reviewed literature and did not include evidence from abstracts, conference presentations or unpublished personal communications.
The present document contains recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis of hypertension, and assessment of cardiovascular risk for adults with high blood pressure. These include the accurate measurement of blood pressure, criteria for the diagnosis of hypertension and recommendations for follow-up, assessment of overall cardiovascular risk, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular and endocrine causes, home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and the role of echocardiography for those with hypertension. Key features of the 2006 recommendations include continued emphasis on an expedited diagnosis of hypertension, an in-depth review of the role of global risk assessment in hypertension therapy, and the use of home/self blood pressure monitoring for patients with masked hypertension (subjects with hypertension who have a blood pressure that is normal in clinic but elevated on home/self measurement).
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and were voted on by the 45 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported herein received at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
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Cites: CMAJ. 2005 Aug 30;173(5):480-316129865
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2001 May;17(5):543-5911381277
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Jul 11;286(2):180-711448281
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Cites: Am Heart J. 2000 Feb;139(2 Pt 1):272-8110650300
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Cites: BMJ. 2001 Apr 21;322(7292):977-8011312234
Cites: J Hypertens. 2002 Apr;20(4):579-8111910284
Cites: Stroke. 2002 Jul;33(7):1776-8112105351
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Cites: Eur Heart J. 2003 Jun;24(11):987-100312788299
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Cites: JAMA. 1996 May 22-29;275(20):1571-68622248
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1996 Jul 8;156(13):1414-208678709
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1998 Mar 23;158(6):655-629521231
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Nov 17;292(19):2350-615547162
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2005 Jun;18(6):772-815925734
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Cites: Blood Press Monit. 2002 Dec;7(6):293-30012488648
PubMed ID
16755312 View in PubMed
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The ability of vegetation size on echocardiography to predict clinical complications: a meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54509
Source
J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 1997 Jun;10(5):562-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
M D Tischler
P T Vaitkus
Author Affiliation
Cardiology Unit, University of Vermont College of Medicine and Fletcher Allen Health Care, Burlington, USA.
Source
J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 1997 Jun;10(5):562-8
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Confidence Intervals
Echocardiography
Embolism - etiology
Endocarditis, Bacterial - complications - mortality - surgery - ultrasonography
Heart Valve Prosthesis
Humans
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Abstract
To clarify whether echocardiographic detection of a vegetation 10 mm or larger in size in patients with left-sided infective endocarditis poses an increased risk for complications, we performed a meta-analysis of English-language publications identified by a computerized search of the key words infective endocarditis and echocardiography. A pooled odds ratio was calculated by using the Robins, Greenland, and Breslow estimate of variance. The pooled odds ratio for increased risk of systemic embolization in the presence of a vegetation >10 mm (10 studies, 738 patients) was 2.80 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.95 to 4.02; p 10 mm pose a significantly increased risk of (1) systemic embolization and (2) a need for valve-replacement surgery than cases where either no or smaller vegetations are detected.
PubMed ID
9203497 View in PubMed
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Abnormal echocardiography in patients with type 2 diabetes and relation to symptoms and clinical characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286353
Source
Diab Vasc Dis Res. 2016 Sep;13(5):321-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Peter Godsk Jørgensen
Magnus T Jensen
Rasmus Mogelvang
Bernt Johan von Scholten
Jan Bech
Thomas Fritz-Hansen
Søren Galatius
Tor Biering-Sørensen
Henrik U Andersen
Tina Vilsbøll
Peter Rossing
Jan S Jensen
Source
Diab Vasc Dis Res. 2016 Sep;13(5):321-30
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diastole
Echocardiography, Doppler
Electrocardiography
Female
Humans
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Risk factors
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - physiopathology
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
We aimed to determine the prevalence of echocardiographic abnormalities and their relation to clinical characteristics and cardiac symptoms in a large, contemporary cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes.
A total of 1030 patients with type 2 diabetes participated. Echocardiographic abnormalities were present in 513 (49.8%) patients, mainly driven by a high prevalence of diastolic dysfunction 178 (19.4%), left ventricular hypertrophy 213 (21.0%) and left atrial enlargement, 200 (19.6%). The prevalence increased markedly with age from 31.1% in the youngest group (75?years) (p?
PubMed ID
27208801 View in PubMed
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Abstracts of the Fourteenth Annual Meeting of the European Association of Echocardiography. December 8-11, 2010. Copenhagen, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99902
Source
Eur J Echocardiogr. 2010 Dec;11 Suppl 2:ii1-202
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Source
Eur J Echocardiogr. 2010 Dec;11 Suppl 2:ii1-202
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Animals
Echocardiography
Heart Diseases - ultrasonography
Humans
PubMed ID
21140547 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of noninvasive stress myocardial imaging for detecting coronary artery disease in clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143550
Source
Hosp Pract (1995). 2010 Apr;38(2):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Leonard Schwartz
Christopher B Overgaard
Author Affiliation
Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. Dr.Leonard.Schwartz@uhn.on.ca
Source
Hosp Pract (1995). 2010 Apr;38(2):14-8
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Angiography - standards
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology
Echocardiography - standards
Exercise Test - standards
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods - standards
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Selection
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Distribution
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon - standards
Abstract
There is a wide variation in reported accuracy ofnoninvasive stress myocardial imaging as a screening tool for coronary artery disease (CAD). This study was undertaken to determine its current accuracy in a wide spectrum of patients with chest pain syndromes using invasive coronary angiography as the gold standard.
The patient population consisted of consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography in whom noninvasive stress imaging, either nuclear or echocardiographic, was performed within 6 months prior to the angiogram. The specificity, sensitivity, positive and negative predictive values, and diagnostic accuracy for detecting > or =1 lesions with > or =50% diameter coronary stenosis were determined for each modality.
Of the 227 eligible patients, 141 were men and 86 were women; 70% had significant CAD. The diagnostic accuracy overall was 71% and was no different for nuclear or echocardiographic testing. The positive predictive value (86% vs. 52%; P = 0.002) and diagnostic accuracy (83% vs. 51%; P = 0.002) were better in men than in women.
In this study, noninvasive stress imaging lacked the accuracy of a good screening test for significant CAD. This finding was particularly true for women, for whom it was not much better than a coin toss.
PubMed ID
20469609 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of routine echocardiographic measurements made by an inexperienced examiner through tele-instruction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68989
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 1996;2(3):148-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
J E Afset
P. Lunde
K. Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Kirkenes Hospital, Norway.
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 1996;2(3):148-54
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Echocardiography - economics - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Norway
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Telemedicine - economics - methods
Video Recording
Abstract
The reproducibility and accuracy of routine echocardiographic measurements made by an inexperienced doctor using tele-instruction were evaluated. Thirty-eight patients were first examined at a local hospital by an inexperienced doctor instructed by a specialist 450 km away at a university hospital. The specialist then examined the patients at the local hospital using the same equipment, after an average of 50 days. The accuracy of M-mode and quantitative Doppler measurements was comparable to that observed in reproducibility studies made under normal examination conditions. There were no systematic measurement errors. No important M-mode information was missed except evidence of left ventricular hypertrophy in six patients. In the two-dimensional examination there were differences of clinical significance in only three patients. There were no clinically important differences in the Doppler quantification of mitral and aortic regurgitation. Tele-instructed echocardiography is also an excellent educational tool, allowing an inexperienced examiner gradually to take responsibility for the local echocardiographic service.
PubMed ID
9375049 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of the initial evaluation of heart murmurs in neonates: do we need an echocardiogram?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171318
Source
Pediatr Cardiol. 2006 Mar-Apr;27(2):234-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
A S Azhar
H S Habib
Author Affiliation
International Medical Center, P.O. Box 2172, Jeddah, 21451, Saudi Arabia.
Source
Pediatr Cardiol. 2006 Mar-Apr;27(2):234-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiology
Clinical Competence
Echocardiography
Heart Murmurs - ultrasonography
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Neonatology
Ontario
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The objective of this study was to determine the differences between neonatologists and pediatric cardiologists with regards to the initial assessment of neonatal heart murmur and to evaluate the role of echocardiography in this group of patients. During a period of 1 year, all neonates with heart murmur seen in pediatric cardiology consultation from neonatal intensive care units at the Children Hospital of Eastern Ontario and Ottawa General Hospital were included in this study. Neonates with heart murmur were initially evaluated clinically by a neonatologist and the most likely clinical diagnosis was recorded. This was followed by similar evaluation and assessment by the pediatric cardiologist, who did not know the result of the previous assessment. Echocardiography diagnosis was considered the gold standard for the accurate diagnosis in the two groups, and it was done for all patients. For the neonatologists, the sensitivity to detect a pathological murmur was 78% and the specificity was 33%; the positive predictive value was 77% and the negative predictive value was 37%. For the pediatric cardiologists, the accuracy of the clinical examination showed a sensitivity of 83% in detecting a pathological murmur and a specificity of 25%; the positive predictive value was 80% and the negative predictive value was 29%. There was no significant difference between the two groups. Certified neonatologists are able to assess the significance of neonatal heart murmurs well as pediatric cardiologists, although echocardiogram is still needed to reach the accurate diagnosis of congenital heart disease in neonates even if a pediatric cardiologist is consulted.
PubMed ID
16391989 View in PubMed
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769 records – page 1 of 77.