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Alveolar hydatid disease. A review of clinical features of 33 indigenous cases of Echinococcus multilocularis infection in Alaskan Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4252
Source
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 1980 Nov;29(6):1340-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1980
Author
J F Wilson
R L Rausch
Source
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 1980 Nov;29(6):1340-55
Date
Nov-1980
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Alveolar hydatid disease
Child
Diagnosis, Differential
Echinococcosis, Hepatic - diagnosis - pathology - surgery
Echinococcus multilocularis
Echinococcosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis - surgery
Female
Humans
Inuits
Liver - pathology
Male
Mebendazole
Middle Aged
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Zoonosis
Abstract
The clinical features of 33 cases of alveolar hydatid disease (AHD) in Alaskan Eskimos and a review of the surgical experience with this disease are presented. Among untreated patients, progression of the disease to a fatal outcome was observed in 70%. The primary hepatic lesion resembles cancer, and errors in diagnosis by both the surgeon and pathologist are common. Although surgical resection of the entire primary hepatic lesion offers the only proven curative treatment, only 26% of those explored were resectable. All seven patients resected for cure are alive 6-27 years post-operatively (average survival, 14.7 years). A 5-year experience with continuous mebendazole therapy in the management of five nonresectable cases of AHD indicates that a favorable effect of this drug is being observed. It now appears that Echinococcus infections are no longer the sole province of the surgeon. Although the role of medical therapy is not yet clearly defined, it must be considered in the management of all cases of AHD. The first reported locally-acquired case of AHD in the conterminous United States, and the widespread occurrence and expanding range of E. multilocularis in the north-central United States and south-central Canada, point to the increasing public health importance of alveolar hydatid disease.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2086.
PubMed ID
7446824 View in PubMed
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Alveolar hydatid disease of the liver: rationale and technics of surgical treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2623
Source
Annals of Surgery. 157(4):548-559.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1963
  1 website  
Author
West, J.T.
Hillman, F.J.
Rausch, R.L.
Author Affiliation
U.S. Indian Health Service
Source
Annals of Surgery. 157(4):548-559.
Date
1963
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Point Hope
Kotzebue
Savoonga
Gambell
Nome
Alveolar hydatid disease
Echinococcus multilocularis
Zoonosis
Surgery
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2084.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 936.
Online Resources
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An ELISA test for diagnosis and screening of Echinococcus multilocularis in a high-risk Inupiat Eskimo population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1387
Source
Pages 691-692 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, UmeÃ?Â¥, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Arctic Medical Research, Vol. 47: Suppl. 1, pp. 691 -692, 1988 AN ELISA TEST FOR DIAGNOSIS AND SCREENING OF ECHINOCOCCUS MULTILOCULARIS IN A HIGH-RISK INUPIAT ESKIMO POPULATION A. P. Lanier (1), D. E. Trujillo (2), P. M. Schantz (3), J. P. Wilson (2), B. Gottstein (4), and B. J. McMahon (2
  1 document  
Author
Lanier, A.P.
Author Affiliation
U.S. Centers for Disease Control
Source
Pages 691-692 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, UmeÃ?Â¥, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alveolar hydatid disease
Echinococcus multilocularis
ELISA test
Zoonosis
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2063.
Documents
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Assessment of use of microsatellite polymorphism analysis for improving spatial distribution tracking of echinococcus multilocularis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162440
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2007 Sep;45(9):2943-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
J. Knapp
J M Bart
M L Glowatzki
A. Ito
S. Gerard
S. Maillard
R. Piarroux
B. Gottstein
Author Affiliation
Institute of Parasitology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. jenny.knapp@univ-fcomte.fr
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2007 Sep;45(9):2943-50
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Animals, Wild
Asia
Canada
Cluster analysis
Echinococcosis - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Echinococcosis, Hepatic - epidemiology - parasitology
Echinococcus multilocularis - classification - genetics
Europe
Genotype
Geography
Humans
Microsatellite Repeats - genetics
Molecular Epidemiology
Polymorphism, Genetic
Abstract
Alveolar echinococcosis (AE)--caused by the cestode Echinococcus multilocularis--is a severe zoonotic disease found in temperate and arctic regions of the northern hemisphere. Even though the transmission patterns observed in different geographical areas are heterogeneous, the nuclear and mitochondrial targets usually used for the genotyping of E. multilocularis have shown only a marked genetic homogeneity in this species. We used microsatellite sequences, because of their high typing resolution, to explore the genetic diversity of E. multilocularis. Four microsatellite targets (EmsJ, EmsK, and EmsB, which were designed in our laboratory, and NAK1, selected from the literature) were tested on a panel of 76 E. multilocularis samples (larval and adult stages) obtained from Alaska, Canada, Europe, and Asia. Genetic diversity for each target was assessed by size polymorphism analysis. With the EmsJ and EmsK targets, two alleles were found for each locus, yielding two and three genotypes, respectively, discriminating European isolates from the other groups. With NAK1, five alleles were found, yielding seven genotypes, including those specific to Tibetan and Alaskan isolates. The EmsB target, a tandem repeated multilocus microsatellite, found 17 alleles showing a complex pattern. Hierarchical clustering analyses were performed with the EmsB findings, and 29 genotypes were identified. Due to its higher genetic polymorphism, EmsB exhibited a higher discriminatory power than the other targets. The complex EmsB pattern was able to discriminate isolates on a regional and sectoral level, while avoiding overdistinction. EmsB will be used to assess the putative emergence of E. multilocularis in Europe.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17634311 View in PubMed
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Changes in the Alaskan Eskimo relation of man to dog and their effect on two human diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1408
Source
Arctic Anthropology. 17(1):2-26.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
Lantis, M.
Author Affiliation
University of Kentucky
Source
Arctic Anthropology. 17(1):2-26.
Date
1980
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Zoonosis
Echinococcus granulosus
Echinococcus multilocularis
Alveolar hydatid disease
Cystic hydatid disease
Transmission
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2064.
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A clinical trial of mebendazole in the treatment of alveolar hydatid disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2668
Source
American Review of Respiratory Disease. 1978 Oct: 118(4):747-757.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
Wilson, J.F.
Davidson, M.
Rausch, R.L.
Author Affiliation
U.S. Indian Health Service
Source
American Review of Respiratory Disease. 1978 Oct: 118(4):747-757.
Date
1978
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alveolar hydatid disease
Echinococcus multilocularis
Zoonosis
Administration, Oral
Adult
Aged
Benzimidazoles - therapeutic use
Drug Evaluation
Echinococcosis, Hepatic - drug therapy - immunology - radiography
Echinococcosis, Pulmonary - drug therapy - immunology - radiography
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Inuits
Liver Abscess - surgery
Male
Mebendazole - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Suction
Abstract
In July 1974, mebendazole was reported to be effective against the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus in experimentally infected mice. A clinical trial of mebendazole was initiated in December 1974 in 4 patients with far advanced, nonresectable lesions caused by Echinococcus multilocularis. A daily dose of 40 mg of the drug per kg of body weight was administered to the 4 patients for more than 3 years. No evidence of toxicity or adverse reactions has been observed. Detectable plasma mebendazole concentrations were achieved with high-dose mebendazole therapy. Serum concentrations of IgE increased and decreased early in therapy. There was no evidence that the larval cestode was killed. The metastatic lesions appeared to be stabilized or diminished, and over-all clinical results were encouraging. Progressively enlarging thoracic metastases in 2 patients regressed during therapy, and symptomatic improvement was observed in all 4 patients. Mebendazole, a highly effective antihelmintic in enteric infections, is poorly absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract. Resulting low serum concentrations limit treatment of the massive, scirrhous lesions characteristic of E. multilocularis infections. Nevertheless, encouraging clinical responses observed with mebendazole therapy suggest that a more soluble form of this or a related drug might prove highly effective in the medical management of hydatid disease in humans.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2087.
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Comparison of serologic tests for the diagnosis and follow-up of alveolar hydatid disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38749
Source
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 1987 Nov;37(3):609-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1987
Author
A P Lanier
D E Trujillo
P M Schantz
J F Wilson
B. Gottstein
B J McMahon
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Laboratory, Centers for Disease Control, Anchorage, Alaska 99501.
Source
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 1987 Nov;37(3):609-15
Date
Nov-1987
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alveolar hydatid disease
Animals
Antibodies
Antigens, Helminth - analysis
Child
Comparative Study
Echinococcosis, Pulmonary - blood - diagnosis - immunology
Echinococcus multilocularis - immunology
ELISA test
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Parasitic Diseases - blood - diagnosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Alveolar hydatid disease is a serious and often fatal condition caused by infection with the metacestode form of Echinococcus multilocularis. Sera of 21 patients with histologically confirmed disease were tested by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a semi-purified E. multilocularis antigen fraction (Em2) and by indirect hemagglutination (IHA) and double diffusion (DD5) tests using antigens prepared from E. granulosus cyst fluid. At diagnosis, sera from all 21 patients were positive by Em2 ELISA, 18 (86%) by IHA, and 5 (24%) by DD5. Em2 ELISA detected an antibody response earlier than IHA in 4 of 9 patients from whom sera were available before diagnosis. Following complete surgical resection, Em2 ELISA converted from positive to negative in serum of 2 of 3 patients, while IHA results did not change. Following incomplete resection, 14 of 15 patients tested remained positive by Em2 ELISA, while 12 remained positive by IHA. Of sera from 361 healthy persons from regions free of E. multilocularis, none were positive by Em2 ELISA, while 8% were positive by IHA. Of sera from 59 patients with non-echinococcal parasitic infections, none were positive by Em2 ELISA, while 31% were positive by IHA. Thus, in comparison with tests using E. granulosus antigens, Em2 ELISA appears to be more sensitive and specific for diagnosing AHD, useful on follow-up of resected patients, and positive earlier in the course of disease.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2062.
PubMed ID
3688314 View in PubMed
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Control of cystic echinococcosis/hydatidosis: 1863-2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82074
Source
Adv Parasitol. 2006;61:443-508
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Craig P S
Larrieu E.
Author Affiliation
Cestode Zoonoses Research Group, Biomedical Sciences Institute & School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Salford, Greater Manchester M5 4WT, UK.
Source
Adv Parasitol. 2006;61:443-508
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cyprus - epidemiology
Dog Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology - prevention & control
Dogs
Echinococcosis - epidemiology - history - prevention & control
Echinococcus granulosus - physiology
Echinococcus multilocularis - pathogenicity
Falkland Islands - epidemiology
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
National Health Programs - history - organization & administration - standards
New Zealand - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Sheep
Sheep Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology - prevention & control
Tasmania - epidemiology
Vaccination - veterinary
Zoonoses - epidemiology - history - parasitology
Abstract
Echinococcosis/hydatidosis, caused by Echinococcus granulosus, is a chronic and debilitating zoonotic larval cestode infection in humans, which is principally transmitted between dogs and domestic livestock, particularly sheep. Human hydatid disease occurs in almost all pastoral communities and rangeland areas of the underdeveloped and developed world. Control programmes against hydatidosis have been implemented in several endemic countries, states, provinces, districts or regions to reduce or eliminate cystic echinococcosis (CE) as a public health problem. This review assesses the impact of 13 of the hydatid control programmes implemented, since the first was introduced in Iceland in 1863. Five island-based control programmes (Iceland, New Zealand, Tasmania, Falklands and Cyprus) resulted, over various intervention periods (from 50 years), in successful control of transmission as evidenced by major reduction in incidence rates of human CE, and prevalence levels in sheep and dogs. By 2002, two countries, Iceland and New Zealand, and one island-state, Tasmania, had already declared that hydatid disease had been eliminated from their territories. Other hydatid programmes implemented in South America (Argentina, Chile, Uruguay), in Europe (mid-Wales, Sardinia) and in East Africa (northwest Kenya), showed varying degrees of success, but some were considered as having failed. Reasons for the eventual success of certain hydatid control programmes and the problems encountered in others are analysed and discussed, and recommendations for likely optimal approaches considered. The application of new control tools, including use of a hydatid vaccine, are also considered.
PubMed ID
16735171 View in PubMed
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Current status of alveolar hydatid disease in northern regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2044
Source
Pages 245-247 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
  1 document  
Author
Rausch, R.L.
Wilson, J.F.
Author Affiliation
University of Washington
Source
Pages 245-247 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle.
Date
1985
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alveolar hydatid disease
Echinococcus multilocularis
Mebendazole
Surgery
Zoonosis
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2078.
Documents
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Detection of a high-endemic focus of Echinococcus multilocularis in red foxes in southern Denmark, January 2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115372
Source
Euro Surveill. 2013;18(10):20420
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
H L Enemark
M N Al-Sabi
J. Knapp
M. Staahl
M. Chríel
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Euro Surveill. 2013;18(10):20420
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Denmark - epidemiology
Echinococcosis - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Echinococcus multilocularis - isolation & purification
Endemic Diseases - statistics & numerical data - veterinary
Female
Foxes - parasitology
Humans
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Male
Population Surveillance
Abstract
The Danish surveillance programme for Echinococcus multilocularis was initiated in September 2011, and so far 679 wild carnivores have been examined. In April 2012, one infected fox was detected in Højer near the Danish-German border, and in January 2013 three additional foxes from the same area were found infected. Local prevalence in the area was 31% (four of 13 foxes) which is a new epidemiological situation calling for reevaluation of the national risk management.
PubMed ID
23515060 View in PubMed
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42 records – page 1 of 5.