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Genetic diversity of Echinococcus spp. in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107682
Source
Parasitology. 2013 Nov;140(13):1637-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Sergey V Konyaev
Tetsuya Yanagida
Minoru Nakao
Galina M Ingovatova
Yakov N Shoykhet
Alexandr Y Bondarev
Valeriy A Odnokurtsev
Kyunnyay S Loskutova
Gulnur I Lukmanova
Nikolai E Dokuchaev
Sergey Spiridonov
Mikhail V Alshinecky
Tatyana N Sivkova
Oleg N Andreyanov
Sergey A Abramov
Anton V Krivopalov
Sergey V Karpenko
Natalia V Lopatina
Tamara A Dupal
Yasuhito Sako
Akira Ito
Author Affiliation
Institute of Systematics and Ecology of Animals, SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia.
Source
Parasitology. 2013 Nov;140(13):1637-47
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
DNA, Helminth - classification - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - classification - genetics
Echinococcosis - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - parasitology
Echinococcus - classification - genetics
Electron Transport Complex IV - classification - genetics
Genetic Variation
Genome, Mitochondrial
Genotype
Host Specificity
Humans
Molecular Epidemiology
Phylogeny
Russia - epidemiology
Species Specificity
Abstract
In Russia, both alveolar and cystic echinococcoses are endemic. This study aimed to identify the aetiological agents of the diseases and to investigate the distribution of each Echinococcus species in Russia. A total of 75 Echinococcus specimens were collected from 14 host species from 2010 to 2012. Based on the mitochondrial DNA sequences, they were identified as Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.), E. canadensis and E. multilocularis. E. granulosus s.s. was confirmed in the European Russia and the Altai region. Three genotypes, G6, G8 and G10 of E. canadensis were detected in Yakutia. G6 was also found in the Altai region. Four genotypes of E. multilocularis were confirmed; the Asian genotype in the western Siberia and the European Russia, the Mongolian genotype in an island of Baikal Lake and the Altai Republic, the European genotype from a captive monkey in Moscow Zoo and the North American genotype in Yakutia. The present distributional record will become a basis of public health to control echinococcoses in Russia. The rich genetic diversity demonstrates the importance of Russia in investigating the evolutionary history of the genus Echinococcus.
PubMed ID
23985385 View in PubMed
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[Human alveolar echinococcosis: an emerging zoonosis in Hungary and Europe].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178268
Source
Orv Hetil. 2004 Aug 8;145(32):1655-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-8-2004
Author
Tamás Sréter
Zoltán Széll
István Varga
Author Affiliation
Országos Allategészségügyi Intézet, Vadbetegségek és Parazitológiai Osztály, Budapest. sretert@oai.hu
Source
Orv Hetil. 2004 Aug 8;145(32):1655-63
Date
Aug-8-2004
Language
Hungarian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Albendazole - administration & dosage
Animals
Animals, Wild
Anthelmintics - administration & dosage
Disease Reservoirs
Disease Vectors
Echinococcosis, Hepatic - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Echinococcus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Europe - epidemiology
Foxes
Humans
Hungary - epidemiology
Liver - parasitology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Mass Screening - methods
Mebendazole - administration & dosage
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Primary prevention - methods
RNA, Helminth - isolation & purification
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Zoonoses - epidemiology
Abstract
Human alveolar echinococcosis, caused by the metacestode stage of Echinococcus multilocularis, is one of the most dangerous zoonoses in the temperate and arctic areas of northern hemisphere. The mortality of the disease exceeds 95% in untreated or inadequately treated patients. In the past three decades, the spread of this parasite was observed in Europe as a consequence of human interventions resulting in the population size increase of foxes. The authors demonstrated the presence of E. multilocularis in foxes in all northern counties of Hungary and the existence of hyperendemic regions in the Counties Nógrád and Gyor-Moson-Sopron. The aim of the present paper is to summarize the current knowledge on the life cycle and distribution of E. multilocularis, and the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and control of human alveolar echinococcosis.
Notes
Comment In: Orv Hetil. 2005 Apr 17;146(16):773; discussion 77315889676
PubMed ID
15384864 View in PubMed
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Molecular identification of human echinococcosis in the Altai region of Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124227
Source
Parasitol Int. 2012 Dec;61(4):711-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Sergey V Konyaev
Tetsuya Yanagida
Galina M Ingovatova
Yakov N Shoikhet
Minoru Nakao
Yasuhito Sako
Alexandr Y Bondarev
Akira Ito
Author Affiliation
Institute of Systematics and Ecology of Animals SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia.
Source
Parasitol Int. 2012 Dec;61(4):711-4
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Echinococcosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Echinococcus - classification - genetics
Haplotypes
Humans
Phylogeny
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Mitochondrial haplotypes were determined for Echinococcus species infecting individuals diagnosed with alveolar echinococcosis (AE) and cystic echinococcosis (CE) at Altai State Medical University Hospital in Barnaul, Russia during 2008 to 2011. The nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene was determined for 31 of 34 AE and 8 of 12 CE cases. All of the AE cases were confirmed to be caused by Asian type Echinococcus multilocularis, while CE cases were caused by Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (genotype G1) and Echinococcus canadensis (genotype G6).
PubMed ID
22609955 View in PubMed
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