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1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122035
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Max Talbot
Bethann Meunier
Vincent Trottier
Michael Christian
Tracey Hillier
Chris Berger
Vivian McAlister
Scott Taylor
Author Affiliation
1 Canadian Field Hospital, Canadian Forces, Montreal, QC. max_talbot@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Earthquakes
Female
Haiti
Hospitals, Packaged - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Multiple Trauma - etiology - surgery
Operating Rooms
Relief Work - organization & administration
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Canadian Forces' (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22854149 View in PubMed
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Source
American Journal of Psychiatry. 1964 Oct;121(4):313-317
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1964
Author
Bowman, KM
Author Affiliation
Alaska Psychiatric Institute, Anchorage, Alaska
Source
American Journal of Psychiatry. 1964 Oct;121(4):313-317
Date
Oct-1964
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska Psychiatric Institute
Anchorage
Good Friday
Alaska
Disasters
Dogs
Fear
Earthquakes
Emergency Service, Hospital
Abstract
"On Good Friday, March 27, 1964, the Alaska earthquake occurred which was probably the largest or equal to the largest earthquake that has ever been recorded," Dr. Karl Bowman writes. "Those of us living in Anchorage were quickly isolated, and, since the badly damaged part of the city was roped off and no one allowed inside of it, and since I was completely occupied with things at the Alaska Psychiatric Institute, I have very little firsthand information about some of the early days of the earthquake except in this one special site."
PubMed ID
14211402 View in PubMed
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Beyond the band-aids: what is "good" international aid?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143828
Source
Can Nurse. 2010 Apr;106(4):40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Barbara Carpio
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario.
Source
Can Nurse. 2010 Apr;106(4):40
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disasters
Earthquakes
Haiti
Health services needs and demand
Humans
International Cooperation
Relief Work - economics - organization & administration
Social Justice
PubMed ID
20437734 View in PubMed
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Chloroquine-resistant malaria in travelers returning from Haiti after 2010 earthquake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122172
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2012 Aug;18(8):1346-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Myriam Gharbi
Dylan R Pillai
Rachel Lau
Véronique Hubert
Krishna Khairnar
Alexandre Existe
Eric Kendjo
Sabina Dahlström
Philippe J Guérin
Jacques Le Bras
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2012 Aug;18(8):1346-9
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Antimalarials - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Chloroquine - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Disasters
Drug Resistance - genetics
Earthquakes
Female
France - epidemiology
Genotype
Haiti
Humans
Infant
Malaria, Falciparum - drug therapy - parasitology
Male
Membrane Transport Proteins - genetics
Middle Aged
Parasitic Sensitivity Tests
Plasmodium falciparum - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Protozoan Proteins - genetics
Travel
Young Adult
Abstract
We investigated chloroquine sensitivity to Plasmodium falciparum in travelers returning to France and Canada from Haiti during a 23-year period. Two of 19 isolates obtained after the 2010 earthquake showed mixed pfcrt 76K+T genotype and high 50% inhibitory concentration. Physicians treating malaria acquired in Haiti should be aware of possible chloroquine resistance.
Notes
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Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 1997;75(2):109-159185362
PubMed ID
22840888 View in PubMed
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Development and predictors of psychological outcomes following the 2008 earthquake in Iceland: a longitudinal cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299184
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Mar; 47(2):269-279
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Edda Bjork Thordardottir
Hulda Gudmundsdottir
Berglind Gudmundsdottir
Anna Margrét Hrólfsdóttir
Thor Aspelund
Arna Hauksdottir
Author Affiliation
1 Faculty of Medicine, Centre of Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Iceland.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Mar; 47(2):269-279
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology
Disasters
Earthquakes
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Survivors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
On 29 May 2008, an earthquake struck in South Iceland. The aim of this study was to explore the trajectories of post-traumatic stress, depressive and anxiety symptoms among exposed inhabitants during the first year following the earthquake, as well as predictors for symptomology.
This was a longitudinal cohort study based on a sample that was randomly selected from the earthquake-stricken area ( n = 1301). Participants answered a questionnaire assessing demographic and disaster-related factors 2 months after the earthquake. In addition, symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression and anxiety were assessed 2, 4, 8 and 12 months post-disaster.
Two months after the earthquake, 5.2% of the participants reported PTSD symptoms, 6.7% depression and 6.4% anxiety symptoms. When comparing first and last time points only, we found a significant decrease in anxiety ( p = 0.05), particulary among females ( p = 0.05), those with a primary education ( p = 0.01), prior history of accidents/disasters ( p = 0.02) and those experiencing damage to their home ( p = 0.02). No significant trends were found when the development of other symptoms between the four time points was assessed.
Findings indicate a reduction in anxiety symptoms between 2 and 12 months post-disaster, with PTSD and depression symptoms remaining fairly constant across time. No trends in symptomology were observed over time. The results highlight the need for continued monitoring of those affected by disasters and the identification of subgroups at risk in the aftermath of natural disasters.
PubMed ID
29745295 View in PubMed
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Source
Nursing Outlook. 1964 May;12(5):57
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1964
Source
Nursing Outlook. 1964 May;12(5):57
Date
May-1964
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Airport Heights Elementary School
Alaska
Anchorage
Red Cross Nursing Services
Earthquakes
Humans
Abstract
Immediately after the Anchorage earthquake on March 27, Sigrid Bullard, Red Cross nursing director for the Alaskan disaster, called for volunteers to work beside hard-pressed hospital and clinic staffs. Within a few hours, 45 nurses and 27 trained Red Cross aides offered their services.
PubMed ID
14144159 View in PubMed
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Effect of the Alaska earthquake on functions of PHS hospital

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2671
Source
Public Health Reports. 1964 Oct;79(10):853-861
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1964
  1 website  
Author
Wilson, M.R.
Author Affiliation
U.S. Indian Health Service
Source
Public Health Reports. 1964 Oct;79(10):853-861
Date
Oct-1964
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Disaster plan
Earthquake
Hospital
Kaguyak
Old Harbor
Village evacuees
Abstract
An earthquake struck Alaska on Good Friday, March 27, 1964. It began at 5:36 p.m. and lasted for 5 minutes. Its epicenter was in the Prince William Sound near Montague Island. Its intensity measured 8.4 units on the Richter Scale; by contrast the San Francisco earthquake was 8.3 units. Only one stronger earthquake has been recorded in modern times.the 1960 Peruvian quake in which many lives were lost.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1565.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 380.
Online Resources
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[Environmental security in the region with heavy exposure to sources of man-made earthquakes].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118050
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 Sep-Oct;(5):52-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
E V Kharlamova
V M Shmandii
S V Gal'chuk
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 Sep-Oct;(5):52-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Earthquakes
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Health - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Risk Assessment - methods
Russia - epidemiology
Safety
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
It is set that in separate regions substantial value at the study of terms of forming of ecological danger it is necessary to spare to research of vibrations of earth surface under effect of technogenic activity of man. Influence of technogenic earthquakes is investigational on a man and dwellings apartments medical and other establishments. Levels are set also intensities resulting in psychological discomfort.
PubMed ID
23243721 View in PubMed
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Evolution of stickleback in 50 years on earthquake-uplifted islands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275188
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Dec 29;112(52):E7204-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-29-2015
Author
Emily A Lescak
Susan L Bassham
Julian Catchen
Ofer Gelmond
Mary L Sherbick
Frank A von Hippel
William A Cresko
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Dec 29;112(52):E7204-12
Date
Dec-29-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Biological Evolution
Earthquakes
Ecosystem
Fresh Water
Gene Flow
Genetic Variation
Genetics, Population
Genotype
Geography
Islands
Oceans and Seas
Phenotype
Phylogeny
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Smegmamorpha - classification - genetics - physiology
Abstract
How rapidly can animal populations in the wild evolve when faced with sudden environmental shifts? Uplift during the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake abruptly created freshwater ponds on multiple islands in Prince William Sound and the Gulf of Alaska. In the short time since the earthquake, the phenotypes of resident freshwater threespine stickleback fish on at least three of these islands have changed dramatically from their oceanic ancestors. To test the hypothesis that these freshwater populations were derived from oceanic ancestors only 50 y ago, we generated over 130,000 single-nucleotide polymorphism genotypes from more than 1,000 individuals using restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq). Population genomic analyses of these data support the hypothesis of recent and repeated, independent colonization of freshwater habitats by oceanic ancestors. We find evidence of recurrent gene flow between oceanic and freshwater ecotypes where they co-occur. Our data implicate natural selection in phenotypic diversification and support the hypothesis that the metapopulation organization of this species helps maintain a large pool of genetic variation that can be redeployed rapidly when oceanic stickleback colonize freshwater environments. We find that the freshwater populations, despite population genetic analyses clearly supporting their young age, have diverged phenotypically from oceanic ancestors to nearly the same extent as populations that were likely founded thousands of years ago. Our results support the intriguing hypothesis that most stickleback evolution in fresh water occurs within the first few decades after invasion of a novel environment.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26668399 View in PubMed
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Feeding evacuees after the Alaskan earthquake

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99611
Source
Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 1964 Sep;45(3):224
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1964
Author
Snell, AE
Author Affiliation
Anchorage Independent School District
Source
Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 1964 Sep;45(3):224
Date
Sep-1964
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Airport Heights School
Alaska
Anchorage
Earthquake
Good Friday
Kodiak Island
Red Cross
Disasters
Food Supply
Humans
Refugees
Abstract
The classrooms were made ready for sleeping quarters and the school lunch department was called on to prepare meals for 350 persons to arrive on Monday from the three coastal villages on Kodiak--Chenega, Kayaguk, and Old Harbor. Our first concern was to obtain food and experienced personnel. Although the kitchen was small, it was efficient, and we could serve 1000 meals a day, in place of the usual 250 school lunches.
PubMed ID
14202732 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.