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Acceptability of an eHealth Intervention to Prevent Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancy Among American Indian/Alaska Native Teens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308304
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2020 01; 44(1):196-202
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
01-2020
Author
Jessica D Hanson
Tess L Weber
Umit Shrestha
Valerie J Bares
Michaela Seiber
Karen Ingersoll
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, Minnesota.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2020 01; 44(1):196-202
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaskan Natives - ethnology - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Contraception - psychology
Early Medical Intervention - methods
Female
Health Risk Behaviors
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Pregnancy
Telemedicine - methods
Abstract
A tribally led Changing High-Risk Alcohol Use and Increasing Contraception Effectiveness Study (CHOICES) Program has successfully decreased the risk of alcohol-exposed pregnancies (AEPs) among adult American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women by either reducing risky drinking or increasing contraception use. However, a community needs assessment revealed a need to implement a similar intervention with AI/AN teens. The goal of the project was to develop and establish the acceptability of CHOICES for AI/AN teens.
Key informant interviews were conducted to review the existing OST CHOICES intervention. After modifications to the existing program, focus groups with AI/AN teens were conducted to ensure validity and to finalize the OST CHAT (CHOICES for American Indian Teens) intervention.
Key informant (N = 15) participants suggested that a Web-based intervention may increase teen engagement by making the intervention more interactive and visually stimulating. Based on this formative research, CHAT was developed via Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap). Feedback on the online CHAT curriculum was given by focus groups comprised of AI/AN adolescents, and participants felt that this type of intervention would be both acceptable and able to implement with a community of reservation-based teens.
This study outlines the development of a Web-based intervention for an AEP intervention for AI/AN teens and will inform future prevention efforts. Implications include an expansion of the evidence-based CHOICES intervention for AI/AN teens and also development of a Web-based intervention for rural, reservation-based AI/AN communities.
PubMed ID
31693195 View in PubMed
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Accounting for individual differences and timing of events: estimating the effect of treatment on criminal convictions in heroin users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261868
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2014;14:68
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Jo Røislien
Thomas Clausen
Jon Michael Gran
Anne Bukten
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2014;14:68
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Crime - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Criminals - legislation & jurisprudence
Early Medical Intervention - methods
Female
Heroin Dependence - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The reduction of crime is an important outcome of opioid maintenance treatment (OMT). Criminal intensity and treatment regimes vary among OMT patients, but this is rarely adjusted for in statistical analyses, which tend to focus on cohort incidence rates and rate ratios. The purpose of this work was to estimate the relationship between treatment and criminal convictions among OMT patients, adjusting for individual covariate information and timing of events, fitting time-to-event regression models of increasing complexity.
National criminal records were cross linked with treatment data on 3221 patients starting OMT in Norway 1997-2003. In addition to calculating cohort incidence rates, criminal convictions was modelled as a recurrent event dependent variable, and treatment a time-dependent covariate, in Cox proportional hazards, Aalen's additive hazards, and semi-parametric additive hazards regression models. Both fixed and dynamic covariates were included.
During OMT, the number of days with criminal convictions for the cohort as a whole was 61% lower than when not in treatment. OMT was associated with reduced number of days with criminal convictions in all time-to-event regression models, but the hazard ratio (95% CI) was strongly attenuated when adjusting for covariates; from 0.40 (0.35, 0.45) in a univariate model to 0.79 (0.72, 0.87) in a fully adjusted model. The hazard was lower for females and decreasing with older age, while increasing with high numbers of criminal convictions prior to application to OMT (all p
Notes
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PubMed ID
24886472 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of the life quality in children with phenylketonuria].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263907
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2014;(11-12):39-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
T V Bushueva
I V Vinyarskaya
V V Chernikov
T E Borovik
L M Kuzenkova
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2014;(11-12):39-45
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Diet Therapy - methods
Early Diagnosis
Early Medical Intervention - methods - statistics & numerical data
Family Health
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neonatal Screening
Parents - psychology
Phenylketonurias - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Russia - epidemiology
Time-to-Treatment
Abstract
Phenylketonuria (PKU) - the most common inherited disorder of amino acid metabolism, identified in Russia by neonatal screening. The results of dietary treatment demonstrate a positive effect. However, the quality of PKU patients life remains unknown.
The aim of the study was to assess the quality of PKU children life in comparison with their healthy peers, also depending on the treatment onset and the patient's age.
The study involved 64 pairs - PKU child and one of his parents. It was used the common questionnaire survey Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQLtm4. 0, Varni et al., USA, 2001) and the program SPSS v. 14.0 (US) for statistical processing of the results.
The statistically significant (p
PubMed ID
25971125 View in PubMed
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Changes in health-related quality of life and functioning ability in help-seeking adolescents and adolescents at heightened risk of developing psychosis during family- and community-oriented intervention model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115632
Source
Int J Psychiatry Clin Pract. 2013 Oct;17(4):253-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Niklas Granö
Marjaana Karjalainen
Virve Edlund
Erkki Saari
Arja Itkonen
Jukka Anto
Mikko Roine
Author Affiliation
Helsinki University Central Hospital, Jorvi Hospital, Department of Psychiatry , Finland.
Source
Int J Psychiatry Clin Pract. 2013 Oct;17(4):253-8
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adolescent
Child
Community Mental Health Services
Disease Susceptibility - psychology
Early Diagnosis
Early Medical Intervention - methods
Family Therapy
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - psychology - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Abstract Objective. Early intervention has been shown to benefit people at-risk for psychosis, but knowledge about how early intervention benefits all help-seeking adolescents is lacking. The aim of the present study was to study change in health-related quality of life (QoL) and functioning ability in help-seeking adolescents who participate in a community- and family-oriented early intervention program. Methods. The data was collected in Finland by an early-intervention team. Ninety help-seeking adolescents between 12 and 21 years of age filled out a questionnaire on QoL (16D) and functioning ability (GAF), which was assessed by workers at the beginning and at the end of the intervention. A PROD screen was used to assess heightened risk of developing psychosis. Results. QoL and functioning ability showed significant differences (p
PubMed ID
23485127 View in PubMed
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Childhood otitis media is associated with dizziness in adulthood: the HUNT cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280713
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2016 Aug;273(8):2047-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Lisa Aarhus
Kristian Tambs
Howard J Hoffman
Bo Engdahl
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2016 Aug;273(8):2047-54
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Audiometry - methods
Child
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Dizziness - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Early Medical Intervention - methods
Female
Hearing Loss - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Otitis Media, Suppurative - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The objective of the study was to examine the association between otitis media in childhood and dizziness in adulthood. Longitudinal, population-based cohort study of 21,962 adults (aged 20-59 years, mean 40) who completed a health questionnaire in the Nord-Trøndelag Hearing Loss Study was conducted. At 7, 10 and 13 years of age, the same individuals underwent screening audiometry in a longitudinal school hearing investigation. Children found with hearing loss underwent an ear, nose and throat specialist examination. Adults diagnosed with childhood chronic suppurative otitis media (n = 102) and childhood hearing loss after recurrent acute otitis media (n = 590) were significantly more likely to have increased risk of reported dizziness when compared to adults with normal hearing as children at the school investigation and also a negative history of recurrent otitis media (n = 21,270), p 
PubMed ID
26335289 View in PubMed
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Coronary angiographic findings after cardiac arrest in relation to ECG and comorbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308836
Source
Resuscitation. 2020 01 01; 146:213-219
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-01-2020
Author
R Lagedal
L Elfwén
M Jonsson
E Lindgren
D Smekal
L Svensson
S James
P Nordberg
S Rubertsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences/Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Uppsala University, Sweden. Electronic address: rickard.lagedal@surgsci.uu.se.
Source
Resuscitation. 2020 01 01; 146:213-219
Date
01-01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Coronary Angiography - methods - statistics & numerical data
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Early Medical Intervention - methods - standards
Electrocardiography - methods
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - methods
Retrospective Studies
Risk Adjustment - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The relations between specific ECG patterns and coronary angiographic findings in cardiac arrest patients with different comorbidities are not properly assessed. More evidence is needed to identify patients with the highest risk for acute coronary artery disease as a cause of the cardiac arrest. This study aims to describe the coronary artery findings after cardiac arrest in relation to ECG and comorbidity.
A retrospective study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients, with coronary angiography performed within 28 days. ECG on admission, comorbidity, PCI attempts and angiographic findings are described. Data were retrieved from national registries in Sweden.
Among 1133 patients with available ECG and angiography information the mean age was 64 years. The rate of shockable rhythm was 79%. The total incidence of any significant stenosis in cardiac arrest patients without ST-elevation who underwent coronary angiography within 28 days was 71%. The incidence of any stenosis in patients with normal ECG was 62.1% and in patients with LBBB, 59.3%. In patients with ST-depression or RBBB, PCI attempts were made in 47.1% and 42.4% respectively, compared with 33.3% in patients with normal ECG. Among patients without ST-elevation, those with diabetes mellitus and those with initial shockable rhythm respectively, 84.8% and 71.5 had at least one significant stenosis.
Our study suggests, that evaluation of ECG patterns and comorbidities in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients without ST-segment elevation may be important to identify those with a high risk of coronary artery lesions that could benefit from early revascularization.
Notes
CommentIn: Resuscitation. 2020 Jan 1;146:258-260 PMID 31682899
PubMed ID
31560991 View in PubMed
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Coronary angiography in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest without ST elevation on ECG-Short- and long-term survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299638
Source
Am Heart J. 2018 06; 200:90-95
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Date
06-2018
Author
Ludvig Elfwén
Rickard Lagedal
Stefan James
Martin Jonsson
Ulf Jensen
Mattias Ringh
Andreas Claesson
Jonas Oldgren
Johan Herlitz
Sten Rubertsson
Per Nordberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
Am Heart J. 2018 06; 200:90-95
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Keywords
Aged
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Coronary Angiography - methods - statistics & numerical data
Coronary Occlusion - complications - diagnostic imaging - mortality - therapy
Early Diagnosis
Early Medical Intervention - methods
Electrocardiography - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The potential benefit of early coronary angiography in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients without ST elevation on ECG is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between early coronary angiography and survival in these patients.
Nationwide observational study between 2008 and 2013. Included were patients admitted to hospital after witnessed OHCA, with shockable rhythm, age 18 to 80 years and unconscious. Patients with ST-elevation on ECG were excluded. Patients that underwent early CAG (within 24 hours) were compared with no early CAG (later during the hospital stay or not at all). Outcomes were survival at 30 days, 1 year, and 3 years. Multivariate analysis included pre-hospital factors, comorbidity and ECG-findings.
In total, 799 OHCA patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, of which 275 (34%) received early CAG versus 524 (66%) with no early CAG. In the early CAG group, the proportion of patients with an occluded coronary artery was 27% and 70% had at least one significant coronary stenosis (defined as narrowing of coronary lumen diameter of =50%). The 30-day survival rate was 65% in early CAG group versus 52% with no early CAG (P
PubMed ID
29898854 View in PubMed
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Do personality traits matter when choosing a group therapy for early psychosis?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116545
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2013 Mar;86(1):19-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Marie-Chantal Beauchamp
Tania Lecomte
Conrad Lecomte
Claude Leclerc
Marc Corbière
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Université de Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2013 Mar;86(1):19-32
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Early Medical Intervention - methods
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Models, Psychological
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Patient Selection
Personality
Personality Inventory
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Psychotic Disorders - psychology - therapy
Recurrence - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed at determining the predictive value of personality traits, based on the Five Factor Model (FFM) of personality, on therapeutic outcomes according to specific group treatments for first episode psychosis: cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) or skills training for symptom management (SM).
Individuals experiencing early psychosis were recruited to participate in a randomized- controlled trial (RCT). Participants were randomized to one of two group treatments or to a wait-list control group. Measures included a personality inventory (NEO-FFI) and outcome measures of symptomatology (BPRS-E) and coping strategies (CCS). Pearson correlation analyses were conducted on 78 individuals and linear regression analyses on 66.
Links were found between personality traits, symptoms, and coping outcome measures, according to specific group treatments. Personality traits were particularly linked to therapeutic changes in active coping strategies, with Conscientiousness accounting for 14% of the variance in the CBT group, Extraversion accounting for 41% of the variance in the SM group, and Openness to experience accounting for 22% of the variance in the control group.
Individual differences in personality traits for people experiencing early psychosis should be considered when offering psychosocial treatments, since it appears that those with specific traits might benefit more than others in specific group interventions, particularly for interventions that do not solely aim at improving symptoms.
PubMed ID
23386553 View in PubMed
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Effect of an Intervention in General Practice to Increase the Participation of Immigrants in Cervical Cancer Screening: A Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306392
Source
JAMA Netw Open. 2020 04 01; 3(4):e201903
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-01-2020
Author
Kathy Ainul Møen
Bernadette Kumar
Jannicke Igland
Esperanza Diaz
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
JAMA Netw Open. 2020 04 01; 3(4):e201903
Date
04-01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Early Detection of Cancer - statistics & numerical data
Early Medical Intervention - methods
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
General Practice - education
Humans
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Registries
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Immigrant women have lower participation in cervical cancer screening (CCS) programs. At the same time, some groups of immigrants have higher prevalence of cervical cancer. Targeted interventions are therefore necessary.
To determine whether an intervention among general practitioners (GPs) could influence immigrant women's participation in the Norwegian CCS program.
Cluster-randomized clinical trial using the 20 subdistricts of the Bergen, Norway, municipality as clusters. The clusters were matched in 10 pairs according to the number of immigrant women living in them and randomized thereafter. The intervention was implemented between January and June 2017 among urban, primary care, general practices in Bergen. Follow-up ended in January 2018. General practices belonging to the control areas continued treatment as usual. A total of 10?360 women who attended 73 general practices in the 20 subdistricts were included as participants.
The intervention consisted of 3 elements: an educational session for GPs at lunch describing the importance of CCS among immigrants and giving advice about how to invite them to participate, a mouse pad as a reminder, and a poster placed in waiting rooms. In the educational session, we elaborated the need for GPs to ask every immigrant woman about CCS, regardless of their reason for contacting their GP.
The main outcome, screening status of immigrant women by January 1, 2018, was obtained from the Norwegian Cancer Registry. The effect of the intervention was measured as odds ratio (OR) for CCS status as of January 1, 2018, for the intervention group vs the control group, with 3 levels of adjustments: baseline CCS status at January 1, 2017 (model 1), additional adjustment for women's age, marital status, income level, and region of origin (model 2), and further adjustment for the GP's sex, age, and region of origin (model 3). Two subgroup analyses, screening status at baseline and women's country of origin, were conducted to assess whether these factors had any influence on the effect of the intervention. Data were analyzed as intention to treat.
A total of 10?360 immigrant women, 5227 (50.4%; mean [SD] age, 44.0 [12.0] years) in the intervention group and 5133 (49.6%; mean [SD] age, 44.5 [11.6] years) in the control group, belonging to 39 general practices in the intervention area and 34 in the control area, were included in the study. The proportion of immigrant women screened increased by 2.6% in the intervention group and 0.6% in the control group. After adjustment for screening status at baseline, women in the intervention group were more likely to have participated in CCS (OR, 1.24 [95% CI, 1.11-1.38]). This statistically significant effect remained unchanged after adjustment for women's characteristics (OR, 1.24 [95% CI, 1.11-1.38]) and was reduced, but still significant, after further adjustment for GP characteristics (OR, 1.19 [95% CI, 1.06-1.34]). In subgroup analyses, the intervention particularly increased participation among women who were not previously screened at baseline (OR, 1.35 [95% CI, 1.16-1.56]), and those from Poland, Pakistan, and Somalia (OR, 1.74 [95% CI, 1.17-2.61]) when adjusting for baseline screening status.
Our intervention targeting general practices significantly increased CCS participation among immigrants, although the absolute effect size of 2% in the fully adjusted model was small. Engaging other primary health professionals such as midwives to perform CCS could further contribute to increasing participation.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03155581.
PubMed ID
32236530 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.