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Alberta Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities: longitudinal study pilot phase.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144778
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2010 Mar;30(2):40-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
A M dela Cruz
P. McCarthy
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Alberta Region, Calgary, Alberta. adelacru@ualberta.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2010 Mar;30(2):40-5
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Child
Child, Preschool
Early Intervention (Education) - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Pilot Projects
Urban Population
Abstract
Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities (AHSUNC) is a federally funded, national, early childhood intervention strategy that addresses the needs of Aboriginal preschool children and their families. A pilot study, based on principles of community-based research, evaluated an Alberta Aboriginal Head Start (AHS) program offered off-reserve in Alberta. Overall, the results pertaining to children having followed an AHS program are positive. This phase 1 of a broader longitudinal evaluation study of all AHS sites in Alberta has led to the creation of several recommendations, which reinforce this type of evaluation and look to mitigate the limitations encountered in phase 1 (around available data, tools and context).
PubMed ID
20302684 View in PubMed
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An oral health survey of Head Start children in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6321
Source
Pages 659-661 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
  1 document  
Author
D B Jones
C M Schlife
Author Affiliation
Alaska Area Native Health Service, Anchorage.
Source
Pages 659-661 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Health Surveys
Early Intervention (Education)
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Oral Health
PubMed ID
1365256 View in PubMed
Documents
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Better Beginnings, Better Futures: a community-based approach to primary prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215593
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1994;13(2):183-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
R D Peters
Author Affiliation
Better Futures Research Coordination Unit, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1994;13(2):183-8
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - prevention & control
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - prevention & control
Child, Preschool
Community Mental Health Services - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Developmental Disabilities - prevention & control
Early Intervention (Education) - economics
Female
Humans
Infant
Learning Disorders - prevention & control
Male
Ontario
Poverty
Psychosocial Deprivation
Risk factors
Abstract
Better Beginnings, Better Futures is a 25-year primary prevention policy research demonstration project. Its major purpose is to assess the extent to which community-based primary prevention programs can be effective in preventing emotional, behavioural, physical and cognitive problems in children from economically disadvantaged communities. The project grew out of a number of primary prevention initiatives introduced by the Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services (MCSS) since the late 1970s. Eleven sites, four of them located on native reserves, received funding in January, 1991 to establish programs in their communities. From the beginning, a qualitative, naturalistic research approach has been utilized to document and understand the ways in which the programs have developed in the various Better Beginnings communities.
PubMed ID
10151074 View in PubMed
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Can a general health surveillance between birth and 10 months identify children with mental disorder at 1(1/2) year? A case-control study nested in cohort CCC 2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93555
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2008 Aug;17(5):290-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Skovgaard Anne Mette
Houmann Tine
Christiansen Eva
Olsen Else Marie
Landorph Susanne Lassen
Lichtenberg Anne
Jørgensen Torben
Author Affiliation
Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Centre, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Glostrup 2600, Denmark. ames@glo.regionH.dk
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2008 Aug;17(5):290-8
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Community Health Nursing
Denmark
Developmental Disabilities - diagnosis - epidemiology - nursing
Early Intervention (Education)
Feeding and Eating Disorders of Childhood - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mass Screening
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - nursing
Mother-Child Relations
Personality Assessment
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Sleep Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Mental health surveillance in infancy was studied in an existing child health surveillance programme with child psychiatric disorder at 1(1/2) year as the outcome. METHODS: Children considered of concern by community health nurses were cases in a case control study nested in the Copenhagen Child Cohort (CCC 2000). Outcome was mental health status at 1(1/2) year assessed by clinical and standardised strategies, including videotape recordings, parent interviews and the instruments: CBCL 1(1/2)-5, ITSCL, CHAT, Bayley Scales of Infant Development II, PC ERA and PIR-GAS. RESULTS: The positive predictive value of concern in the first 10 months of living was 24% (CI 17.0-31.9), the negative predictive value was 85% (CI 77.9-89.6) and the sensitivity was 56% (CI 42.4-69.0). Concern about development was significantly associated with the child having a neuro-developmental disorder at 1(1/2) year, and concern about mother-child relationship was associated with emotional, behavioural, eating, and sleeping disturbances. CONCLUSIONS: A general health surveillance program seems to have potentials to identify infants at risk for mental health problems provided standardised measures and specific training of the involved health professionals.
PubMed ID
18301939 View in PubMed
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Causes, treatment and prevention of early childhood caries: a microbiologic perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4789
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2003 May;69(5):304-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Robert J Berkowitz
Author Affiliation
Eastman Department of Dentistry, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Eastman Dental Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14620, USA. Robert_Berkowitz@urmc.Rochester.edu
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2003 May;69(5):304-7
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Infective Agents, Local - therapeutic use
Bottle Feeding - adverse effects
Child, Preschool
Dental Caries - economics - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Diet, Cariogenic
Disease Transmission, Vertical
Early Intervention (Education)
Guidelines
Health Education, Dental
Hispanic Americans
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Mothers
Povidone-Iodine - therapeutic use
Prevalence
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Streptococcal Infections - transmission
Streptococcus mutans - pathogenicity
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Early childhood caries (ECC) is a virulent form of dental caries that can destroy the primary dentition of toddlers and preschool children. It occurs worldwide, afflicting predominantly disadvantaged children. High-risk North American populations include Hispanic and Native American children, as well as children enrolled in Head Start, a federally funded program for preschool children living in poverty. The prevalence of EEC among these children ranges from 11% to 72%. ECC is an infectious disease, and Streptococcus mutans is the most likely causative agent; diet also plays a critical role in the acquisition and clinical expression of this infection. Early acquisition of S. mutans is a key event in the natural history of the disease. Acquisition may occur via vertical or horizontal transmission. Primary oral colonization by S. mutans coupled with caries-promoting feeding behaviours results in accumulation of these organisms to levels exceeding 30% of the total cultivable plaque flora which in turn leads to rapid demineralization of tooth structure. Treatment of ECC is costly because the cooperative capacity of babies and preschool children usually necessitates the use of general anesthesia. Treatment usually consists of restoration or surgical removal of carious teeth along with recommendations regarding feeding habits. However, this approach has resulted in unacceptable clinical outcomes, and relapse rates of approximately 40% have been reported within the first year after dental surgery. Primary prevention of ECC has largely been restricted to counselling parents about caries-promoting feeding behaviours. This approach has also had minimal success. Newer strategies addressing the infectious component through use of topical antimicrobial therapy appear promising.
PubMed ID
12734024 View in PubMed
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Cross-Cultural Content Validity of the Autism Program Environment Rating Scale in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301125
Source
J Autism Dev Disord. 2019 May; 49(5):1853-1862
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Date
May-2019
Author
Hampus Bejnö
Lise Roll-Pettersson
Lars Klintwall
Ulrika Långh
Samuel L Odom
Sven Bölte
Author Affiliation
Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. hampus.bejno@specped.su.se.
Source
J Autism Dev Disord. 2019 May; 49(5):1853-1862
Date
May-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Keywords
Autism Spectrum Disorder - rehabilitation
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Early Intervention (Education) - methods - standards
Environment
Female
Humans
Male
Schools - standards
Sweden
Translations
Abstract
Increasing rates of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and younger age at diagnosis pose a challenge to preschool intervention systems. In Sweden, most young autistic children receive intervention service in community-based preschool programs, but no tool is yet available to assess the quality of the preschool learning environment. This study adapted the Autism Program Environment Rating Scale Preschool/Elementary to Swedish community context (APERS-P-SE). Following translation and a multistep modification process, independent experts rated the content validity of the adaptation. Findings indicate high cross-cultural validity of the adapted APERS-P-SE. The cultural adaption process of the APERS-P-SE highlights similarities and differences between the American and Swedish preschool systems and their impact on early ASD intervention.
PubMed ID
30617551 View in PubMed
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Dental manpower development in the Pacific: case study in the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164942
Source
Pac Health Dialog. 2007 Mar;14(1):245-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Ohnmar K Tut
Justina R Langidrik
Peter M Milgrom
Author Affiliation
Ministry of Health, Majuro, MH 96960, Republic of the Marshall Islands. ddsmohe@ntamar.net
Source
Pac Health Dialog. 2007 Mar;14(1):245-50
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Dental Assistants - education
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Dental Health Services - manpower
Dentistry - manpower
Early Intervention (Education)
Education, Dental - organization & administration
Humans
Micronesia
Models, Educational
Primary Health Care
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Staff Development
Abstract
This case study reports the ongoing progress and results of a manpower development program to expand indigenous dental personnel at four levels in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. The program was designed to: 1) increase the number of Marshallese students who successfully complete dentistry training; 2) recruit and train a group of Marshallese high school graduates in dental assisting for service in new preventive outreach programs within the community; 3) enhance the dental training of health assistants providing primary medical care to outer islands away from the main population centers of Majuro and Ebeye; and 4) provide in-service training on tooth decay prevention for Head Start teachers. The program resulted in the training of one Marshallese dentist and two Marshallese dental therapist, 16 primary care health aides who received oral health training for work in the outer island dispensaries, and 200 Head Start and kindergarten teachers who completed in-service training in oral health. Additional expertise was shared with other United States Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) to enhance the dental workforce throughout the Pacific.
PubMed ID
19772166 View in PubMed
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Determinants of duration of untreated psychosis among first-episode psychosis patients in Denmark: A nationwide register-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295757
Source
Schizophr Res. 2018 02; 192:154-158
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2018
Author
Lene Halling Hastrup
Ulrik Helt Haahr
Jens Einar Jansen
Erik Simonsen
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Research Unit, Region Zealand Psychiatry, Denmark. Electronic address: lhhs@regionsjaelland.dk.
Source
Schizophr Res. 2018 02; 192:154-158
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Awareness
Demography
Denmark - epidemiology
Early Intervention (Education)
Female
Humans
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
Information on determinants of duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) is still needed to inform campaigns targeting people with first episode psychosis (FEP). This nation-wide study analysed the association between demographic factors (age, sex, ethnicity, marital status, and geographic area), premorbid and illness-related factors (global functional level, substance misuse, and contact to police), healthcare factors (referral source and first FEP contact) and DUP.
The study population of 1266 patients aged 15-25years diagnosed with FEP (ICD10 F20.0-F20.99) was drawn from the Danish National Indicator Project during 2009-2011. The study population was combined with data from national administrative registers. A multinomial regression model was estimated to analyse the impact of demographic, premorbid and illness-related, and healthcare factors on DUP.
One third of the population had a DUP below 6months. DUP longer than 12months was associated with older age at onset, being female, having cannabis misuse, and living in peripheral municipalities. Being charged by the criminal authorities during one year before FEP was associated with a DUP over 6months.
DUP is related to a number of demographic, premorbid and healthcare factors. These findings suggest that future information campaigns should focus on increasing the awareness of early signs of psychosis not only among mental health professionals but also other professionals in contact with adolescents such as the police. It may also be useful to consider how to target information campaigns towards persons living in peripheral areas.
PubMed ID
28578812 View in PubMed
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Dyslexia and early intervention: what did we learn from the Dutch Dyslexia Programme?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106651
Source
Dyslexia. 2013 Nov;19(4):241-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Aryan van der Leij
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Source
Dyslexia. 2013 Nov;19(4):241-55
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Denmark
Dyslexia - epidemiology - genetics - therapy
Early Intervention (Education) - methods
Humans
Netherlands
Phonetics
Reading
Abstract
Part of the Dutch Dyslexia Programme has been dedicated to early intervention. The question of whether the genetically affected learning mechanism of children who are at familial risk (FR) of developing dyslexia could be influenced by training phoneme awareness and letter-sound associations in the prereading phase was investigated. The rationale was that intervention studies reveal insights about the weaknesses of the learning mechanisms of FR children. In addition, the studies aimed to gather practical insights to be used in the development of a system of early diagnosis and prevention. Focused on the last period of kindergarten before formal reading instruction starts in Grade 1, intervention methods with comparable samples and designs but differences in delivery mode (use of computer or manual), tutor (semi-professional or parent), location (at school or at home), and additional practices (serial rapid naming or simple word reading) have been executed to test the hypothesis that the incidence and degree of dyslexia can be reduced. The present position paper summarizes the Dutch Dyslexia Programme findings and relates them to findings of other studies. It is discussed that the Dutch studies provide evidence on why prevention of dyslexia is hard to accomplish. It is argued that effective intervention should not only start early but also be adapted to the individual and often long-lasting educational needs of children at risk of reading failure.
PubMed ID
24133037 View in PubMed
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Source
Rev Neurol. 2002 Feb;34 Suppl 1:S155-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
V. Soriano de Gracia
Author Affiliation
European Agency for Development in Special Needs Education, Brussels, Belgium. victoria@european-agency.org
Source
Rev Neurol. 2002 Feb;34 Suppl 1:S155-7
Date
Feb-2002
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Early Intervention (Education) - economics - manpower - organization & administration
Education, Special
English Abstract
Europe
Humans
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Early attention is one of the tasks of maximum priority. It is the subject of investigation throughout Europe from the educational point of view. OBJECTIVE: We describe the principal characteristics and organization of Early Attention in 18 European countries: the 15 states which are members of the European Union, Norway, Iceland and Lithuania. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The information is based on the study done by the European Agency at the end of 1998 in 17 countries, updated in 2001 and extended to 21 countries. The data obtained from the countries recently included is currently being analyzed bit is not yet fully available. The previous European studies have been repeated and brought up to date by means of questionnaires. The findings have been completed by analysis of practical examples provided by professionals from different countries. RESULTS: We present general information regarding the situation of Early Attention in these 18 countries: its relationship with the educational services, its organization, composition, financing; the organization, function and qualification of the professionals belonging to the Early Attention teams; participation of the families. Conclusion. We show a series of critical factors: the importance of attention being very early, overall evaluation of the child s possibilities and effective cooperation of the child's relatives.
PubMed ID
12447809 View in PubMed
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44 records – page 1 of 5.